@StateDept Issues Revised Visa Reciprocity Fees For Nigeria

 

The US Embassy Abuja in Nigeria announced recently that the visa reciprocity schedule for Nigeria has changed effective August 29, 2019.  The statement notes that  since early 2018, the U.S. government has engaged the Nigerian government to request that the Nigerian government change the fees charged to U.S. citizens for certain visa categories.  Apparently, the government of Nigeria has not changed its fee structure for U.S. citizen visa applicants, so now the State Department has issued new reciprocity fees. Note that visa processing fees, and visa issuance fees are not the same. 

Effective worldwide on 29 August, Nigerian citizens will be required to pay a visa issuance fee, or reciprocity fee, for all approved applications for nonimmigrant visas in B, F, H1B, I, L, and R visa classifications.  The reciprocity fee will be charged in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee, also known as the MRV fee, which all applicants pay at the time of application.  Nigerian citizens whose applications for a nonimmigrant visa are denied will not be charged the new reciprocity fee.  Both reciprocity and MRV fees are non-refundable, and their amounts vary based on visa classification.

U.S. law requires U.S. visa fees and validity periods to be based on the treatment afforded to U.S. citizens by foreign governments, insofar as possible.  Visa issuance fees are implemented under the principle of reciprocity: when a foreign government imposes additional visa fees on U.S. citizens, the United States will impose reciprocal fees on citizens of that country for similar types of visas.  Nationals of a number of countries worldwide are currently required to pay this type of fee after their nonimmigrant visa application is approved.

The total cost for a U.S. citizen to obtain a visa to Nigeria is currently higher than the total cost for a Nigerian to obtain a comparable visa to the United States.  The new reciprocity fee for Nigerian citizens is meant to eliminate that cost difference.

Since early 2018, the U.S. government has engaged the Nigerian government to request that the Nigerian government change the fees charged to U.S. citizens for certain visa categories.  After eighteen months of review and consultations, the government of Nigeria has not changed its fee structure for U.S. citizen visa applicants, requiring the U.S. Department of State to enact new reciprocity fees in accordance with our visa laws.

The reciprocity fee will be required for all Nigerian citizens worldwide, regardless of where they are applying for a nonimmigrant visa to the United States.  The reciprocity fee is required for each visa that is issued, which means both adults and minors whose visa applications are approved will be charged the reciprocity fee.  The fee can only be paid at the U.S. Embassy or the U.S. Consulate General.  The reciprocity fee cannot be paid at banks or any other location.

The new fees range between $80 to $303.00 USD.  The Visa Reciprocity Schedule is available here.

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Photo of the Day: Staffers Smile and Carry Signs Bearing Secretary Kerry’s Face

Posted: 12:21 am ET
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Staffers from U.S. Embassy Abuja Carry Signs Bearing the Face of Secretary Kerry Staffers from U.S. Embassy Abuja carry signs bearing the face of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry before he addresses them and their family members on August 24, 2016, at the U.S. Embassy in Abuja, Nigeria. [State Department Photo/ Public Domain]


Staffers from U.S. Embassy Abuja carry signs bearing the face of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry before he addresses them and their family members on August 24, 2016, at the U.S. Embassy in Abuja, Nigeria. [State Department Photo/ Public Domain]

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US Embassy Nigeria Restricts Movement of American Personnel

On June 23, the US Embassy in Nigeria issued an emergency message to American citizens in Abuja regarding the restrictions of movement of official and diplomatic U.S. personnel:

In light of recent security warnings, continued states of emergency and curfews in the North, and the overnight (June 22/23) explosion of an IED planted by a tree in front of Hanan Plaza opposite Krystal Lounge in Abuja, all official and diplomatic American personnel are restricted from going to all commercial establishments, including restaurants, grocery stores, bars, shopping malls, place of worship, and places of social gatherings.  All such personnel are also restricted from movement in the evening hours. These restrictions will remain in effect until Monday June 25th, 2012, at which time the Embassy will reevaluate the situation.

All American citizens are reminded that this year, extremists have attacked many targets, killing and injuring hundreds of people.  They have targeted churches, mosques, media houses, police stations, immigration and customs offices, financial institutions, markets, state government offices, beer gardens, and nightclubs.  Attackers have also burned and destroyed several public and private schools in Borno and targeted several educational institutions in Kano and churches in Plateau, Bauchi, Kaduna, Niger, and Borno states.

Kidnapping is another common tactic extremists use to instill fear and promote extremist goals. In recent months three Western expatriates kidnapped earlier in the year were killed by extremists in the North. In addition, Nigerian security personnel in the Federal Capital Territory have been reassigned from crime prevention to other security- related assignments.

Domani Spero