AFSA Shouts “Fire!” and a @StateDept Spox on Background Asks, “Fire, What Fire?”

Posted: 2:58 pm PT
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The piece below, in case you have not read it yet, is an advance copy of AFSA President Barbara Stephenson’s opinion essay on the depletion of the Foreign Service career ranks. Not NYT or the Washington Post but for a December 2017 column in the Foreign Service Journal, the group’s trade publication with a reported circulation of 17,500 and approximately 35,000 readers (this column was also circulated via an email marketing service). We’ve been watching the departures from the State Department since January, and this is the first time we’re seeing these numbers. And frankly, the first time we’re hearing the alarm from the “voice of the Foreign Service.” We have some thoughts below after the piece.

 

Time to Ask Why
December 2017 Foreign Service Journal
President’s Views

By AFSA President Ambassador Barbara Stephenson

I begin with a reminder that we, the members of the career Foreign Service, have an obligation as stewards of our institution to be effective advocates for why diplomacy matters. That requires some skill in explaining how diplomacy works.

While raising awareness of and appreciation for the Foreign Service is a longstanding goal, one AFSA has pursued with renewed vigor and impact over the past couple years, the need to make the case for the Foreign Service with fellow Americans and our elected representatives has taken on a new urgency. The cover of the Time magazine that arrived as I was writing this column jarred me with its graphic of wrecking balls and warning of “dismantling government as we know it.”

While I do my best, as principal advocate for our institution and as a seasoned American diplomat, to model responsible, civil discourse, there is simply no denying the warning signs that point to mounting threats to our institution—and to the global leadership that depends on us.

There is no denying that our leadership ranks are being depleted at a dizzying speed, due in part to the decision to slash promotion numbers by more than half. The Foreign Service officer corps at State has lost 60 percent of its Career Ambassadors since January. Ranks of Career Ministers, our three-star equivalents, are down from 33 to 19. The ranks of our two-star Minister Counselors have fallen from 431 right after Labor Day to 369 today—and are still falling. 

These numbers are hard to square with the stated agenda of making State and the Foreign Service stronger. Were the U.S. military to face such a decapitation of its leadership ranks, I would expect a public outcry. Like the military, the Foreign Service recruits officers at entry level and grows them into seasoned leaders over decades. The talent being shown the door now is not only our top talent, but also talent that cannot be replicated overnight. The rapid loss of so many senior officers has a serious, immediate, and tangible effect on the capacity of the United States to shape world events.

Meanwhile, the self-imposed hiring freeze is taking its toll at the entry level. Intake into the Foreign Service at State will drop from 366 in 2016 to around 100 new entry-level officers joining A100 in 2018 (including 60 Pickering and Rangel Fellows).

Not surprisingly, given the blocked entry path, interest in joining the Foreign Service is plummeting. I wrote with pride in my March 2016 column that “more than 17,000 people applied to take the Foreign Service Officer Test last year,” citing interest in joining the Foreign Service as a key indicator of the health of the institution. What does it tell us, then, that we are on track to have fewer than half as many people take the Foreign Service Officer Test this year?

As the shape and extent of the staffing cuts to the Foreign Service at State become clearer, I believe we must shine a light on these disturbing trends and ask “why?” and “to what end?”   

Congress rejected drastic cuts to State and USAID funding. The Senate labeled the proposed cuts a “doctrine of retreat” and directed that appropriated funds “shall support” staffing State at not less than Sept. 30, 2016, levels, and further directed that “The Secretary of State shall continue A-100 entry-level classes for FSOs in a manner similar to prior years.”

Given this clear congressional intent, we have to ask: Why such a focus on slashing staffing at State? Why such a focus on decapitating leadership? How do these actions serve the stated agenda of making the State Department stronger?

Remember, nine in ten Americans favor a strong global leadership role for our great country, and we know from personal experience that such leadership is unthinkable without a strong professional Foreign Service deployed around the world protecting and defending America’s people, interests and values.  Where then, does the impetus come from to weaken the American Foreign Service?  Where is the mandate to pull the Foreign Service team from the field and forfeit the game to our adversaries?

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AFSA says that the Foreign Service officer corps “has lost 60 percent of its Career Ambassadors since January.” We winced when we saw that one. Not all career diplomats attain this rank; in fact, only a handful of individuals are nominated by the President to become Career Ambassadors but this is the very top rank of the Foreign Service, equivalent to a four-star general. Imagine if the Pentagon lost 60 percent of its 0-10 but way, way worse because the Foreign Service is a much smaller service, and the loss of one or two officials have significant impact to the leadership ranks.

When we saw the AFSA message Tuesday night, we noticed that social media started latching on to the 60 percent loss.  AFSA could have used actual numbers as it did with the break down of the second and third top ranks in the FS, but for its own reason, it used the percentage instead of actual numbers for the career ambassadors. So that caused a mild feeding frenzy that’s not helpful because when folks realize that 60 percent is really 3 out of 5 career ambassadors, they won’t be happy.

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Senate Confirmations: Promotion List – Senior FSOs to Class of Career Minister

Posted: 12:26 am ET
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The following-named Career Members of the Senior Foreign Service of the Department of State for promotion within the Senior Foreign Service of the United States of America, Class of Career Minister (FE-CM):

Robert Stephen Beecroft California
Arnold A. Chacon Virginia
Tracey Ann Jacobson District of Columbia
Geoffrey R. Pyatt California
Marie L. Yovanovitch Connecticut

2016-12-07 PN1909 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning Robert Stephen Beecroft, and ending Marie L. Yovanovitch, which 5 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on November 29, 2016.

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Senate Confirmations: Promotion List – Career FSOs to Class of Counselor

Posted: 12:22 am ET
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The following-named Career Member of the Foreign Service for promotion into the Senior Foreign Service, as a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service of the United States of America, Class of Counselor, effective February 21, 2016.

Nominee State
Laura Ann Griesmer Washington

2016-12-07 PN1908 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning Robert L. Adams, and ending Laura Ann Griesmer, which 181 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on November 29, 2016.

The following-named Career Members of the Foreign Service for promotion into the Senior Foreign Service, as a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service of the United States of America, Class of Counselor:

Nominee State
Deanna Hanek Abdeen Virginia
Stephen Anderson Montana
Keith Mims Anderton Virginia
Douglas Joseph Apostol California
Constance C. Arvis Virginia
Jennifer L. Bachus Kansas
Doron D. Bard Washington
Nicholas R. Berliner Virginia
Marcia P. Bosshardt Virginia
David Noel Brizzee Idaho
Dana M. Brown California
Robert G. Burgess District of Columbia
Carol-Anne Chang Virginia
Angela Colyvas-Mcginnis Pennsylvania
Robert E. Copley Colorado
Chad Parker Cummins California
James R. Dayringer Montana
John C. Dockery Texas
Joel Ehrendreich New York
Jewell Elizabeth Evans District of Columbia
Alan E. Eyre Maryland
Eric A. Fichte Washington
Troy Damian Fitrell Virginia
Richard Harris Glenn Virginia
Matthew Eugene Goshko District of Columbia
Ramond F. Greene III District of Columbia
Theresa Grencik Maryland
Anne E. Grimes Virginia
Edward G. Grulich Virginia
Margaret Hawthorne District of Columbia
John Hennessey-Niland Virginia
Christina Maria Huth Higgins Virginia
Melanie Harris Higgins Florida
Lisa S. Kenna Maryland
Jonathan Stuart Kessler Virginia
Cynthia A. Kierscht Minnesota
Michael F. Kleine District of Columbia
Christopher M. Krafft Virginia
Helen Grace LaFave Virginia
Adam Duane Lamoreaux Oregon
Gregory F. Lawless Virginia
Phillip Linderman Virginia
Charles Luoma-Overstreet Virginia
Michael Macy Florida
Jerrold L. Mallory California
Bettina A. Malone Virginia
Ann Barrows McConnell California
Meredith Clare McEvoy Virginia
Richard Mei Jr. Kentucky
Alan D. Meltzer Virginia
Jane S. W. Messenger Maryland
Joaquin F. Monserrate Puerto Rico
Mitchell R. Moss Virginia
Phillip R. Nelson Montana
Elisha Nyman Maryland
Gary Glenn Oba Arkansas
Martha E. Patterson Texas
Roy Albert Perrin Virginia
David D. Potter Virginia
Virginia Sher Ramadan Virginia
Walter Scott Reid Virginia
Jeffrey James Robertson California
Hugo F. Rodriguez Jr. District of Columbia
Russell A. Schiebel Texas
Jonathan A. Schools Texas
Micaela A. Schweitzer-Bluhm Virginia
Mark Wayne Seibel North Carolina
Jonathan L. Shrier New York
Susan Marie Shultz District of Columbia
Eugenia M. Sidereas District of Columbia
David W. Simons Virginia
Jefferson D. Smith Texas
Matthew D. Smith New York
Willard Tenney Smith Virginia
Linda S. Specht Virginia
Gavin A. Sundwall North Carolina
Rebecca T. Brown Thompson Virginia
Scott Brian Ticknor Virginia
Alan R. Tousignant Virginia
Pamela M. Tremont Virginia
Stewart D. Tuttle Jr. California
Heather Catherine Variava Virginia
Amy Hart Vrampas District of Columbia
JoAnne Wagner Virginia
Susan M. Walsh Rhode Island
Eva Anne Weigold Schultz Virginia
Edward Anthony White Florida
Aleisha Woodward Utah

2016-12-07 PN1908 Foreign Service

The following-named Career Members of the Foreign Service for promotion into the Senior Foreign Service, as a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Counselor, and a Consular Officer and a Secretary in the Diplomatic Service of the United States of America:

Nominee State
Wendy A. Bashnan South Carolina
John C. Brewer Alabama
Julie S. Cabus Virginia
Cornell Chasten North Carolina
Natalie Cropper South Carolina
Jaime Esquivel Virginia
Yuri P. Fedorenko Michigan
Donald E. Gonneville Jr. Virginia
Marcia K. Henke Alabama
Paul R. Houston Virginia
Joshua D. McDavid Washington
George M. Navadel District of Columbia
Michael Britton Phillips Maryland
Larry D. Roberts Jr. Virginia
Christopher R. Rooks Virginia
Behzad Shahbazian Maryland
Hartaje K. Thiara District of Columbia
Jeffrey A. Thomas Virginia
Tracy Jo Thomas Virginia
Jennifer S. Tseng Colorado
Thomas R. Vandenbrink Virginia
Judith Vardy Florida

2016-12-07 PN1908 Foreign Service

 

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Restoring Faith in the Foreign Service Assignment System Starts With Talking About It

Posted: 1:27 am EDT
Updated: 2:52 a.m. EDT
Updated March 12, 2016

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We understand that the State Department has just finished up a big online survey on how to improve the Foreign Service bidding process. One part of the survey apparently includes improving the process through “increase transparency.”  Well, it seems it seeks to improve transparency for the bureaus so they can tell who is actually a serious bidder, but it does not improve transparency for the FS employees who are doing the bidding. That part appears to have been short-circuited so unless DGHR starts looking at the whole system, the process is not going to significantly improve for everyone except the bureau folks who are tasked with selecting the employees rotating in.

Now that we’re thinking about the bidding process …. remember last year when we wrote about the controversy about who’s going to be the next Consul General in Istanbul (see Whoa! The Next Consul General in Istanbul Will Be a Political Appointee? and Coming Soon to PBS — That CG Istanbul Position Is Apparently Another Foggy Bottom Drama)?  The March issue of the Foreign Service Journal includes a Speaking Out piece by career diplomat Matthew Keene who has been in the Foreign Service since 1999.  According to FSJ, the author has previously worked in the Office of Career Development and Assignments in the Bureau of Human Resources as a special assistant and an assignments officer.  His piece mentions our blogpost although it does not specifically mention the USCG Istanbul position.

He notes the “tenacity with which many CDOs and AOs argue at panel on behalf of their clients and their bureaus”  and concludes that “these people care about you and the organization, and they are fiercely protective of the integrity of the assignments process.” But the Speaking Out piece also does not mince words about the problems with the Foreign Service assignments.  Excerpt below:

Last November, the blogger known as “Diplopundit” published a story about the assignment of a well-connected FS-1 as principal officer in a European Bureau post, a Senior Foreign Service position.

Since the candidate was below grade for the position, this was a “stretch assignment,” which requires the division in the Bureau of Human Resources responsible for the career development and assignment of officers who are FS-1 or higher (HR/CDA/SL) to cede the position to the division responsible for mid-level officers (HR/CDA/ML) after canvassing its clients to gauge interest in the position by currently unassigned officers.

That no qualified Senior FSO bid on a position as prominent as this one frankly strains credulity. The episode underscores a serious perception problem when it comes to Foreign Service assignments. For all the State Department’s carefully crafted standard operating procedures, as well as the Foreign Affairs Manual and Foreign Affairs Handbook guidance—to say nothing of the attention paid to precedent and the needs of the Service—when push comes to shove, getting the best jobs depends far more on who you know than what.

Indeed, if you are fortunate enough to breathe the rarefied air in the front office of a highly regarded assistant secretary or another sixth- or seventh-floor denizen, there is almost no position to which you cannot aspire.
[…]
So how do ridiculous stretch assignments happen, then? Why do positions mysteriously vanish off one bid list only to reappear days later on the list of a future cycle—or on the now list? Why are inquiries on jobs that are ostensibly open in FS Bid dismissed or unanswered? Why was some employee allowed to extend for a fourth year in a non-differential post when no one else was permitted to do the same? And how on earth did that officer get a language waiver, when the FS is filled with officers who speak that language?

These anomalies are more likely to happen when HR is run by senior officers insufficiently committed to overseeing a system that is fair, just and above reproach. The fact is that far too often, those in the most important positions, the gatekeepers, aren’t serving out of any great love of personnel management work. Some are serving a domestic tour while awaiting a plum overseas deputy chief of mission or principal officer gig. Others find themselves serving domestically for personal reasons, and believe HR provides a convenient landing spot.

The author does not just point out the problems but also writes about how to restore faith in the system. “HR must do a far better job of recruiting senior leaders uncompromising in their commitment to an FS assignments system that sets an example for the rest of the Service in terms of integrity and transparency, that meets the needs of the Service, and that upholds core values even when it is uncomfortable or may disappoint someone further up the food chain.”

Less than a day after we posted this article, we heard via Burn Bag that there is a senior cede request for Deputy Executive Director in Consular Affairs. That position allegedly is not in FSBid. Deleted due to subsequent correction received.

We have to add that this is not just a serious perception problem, and of course, it disturbs more than just the rank and file in Human Resources.  A longtime diplomat who follows this blog told us that “the reason this sort of thing gets to me is that as diplomats we are constantly promoting merit-based decision-making, democracy and rule of law, and anti-corruption in countries where we serve, a very tough message when our own department flaunts these principles.” That is not an isolated perspective.

We admire Mr. Keene for writing this piece. It takes courage to do this in a culture where frank and straight discussions about uncomfortable issues doesn’t always get the safe space it needs.

Read the full More Hemingway, Less Kafka, Please.

Let’s face it, this secretary of state or the next, and next ones after that are not going to do anything about making this process better. They will all have a host of things to do, places to go, and strengthening the institution is not going to be on anyone’s top list.  So here’s something from the Lorax to think about.

 

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Whoa! That’s a Pretty Thin Senior Foreign Service Promotion List You Got There!

Posted: 3:17 am EDT
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The Sad Batman Via @FS_Problems:

When you see the promotion statistics and realize just how few people are getting promoted

AFSA used to publish the FS promotion lists (which are unclassified docs) during the Johnson-Hirsch tenure but it stopped doing that a few years back. The lists below are from senate.gov and are promotions of career members of the Service under section 605 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (Act) based on recommendations and rankings of Selection Boards established under section 602 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (career member promotions into and within the Senior Foreign Service also require the approval of the President).

This looks like a pretty thin promotion list for the Senior Foreign Service. Not only that, most of the names in these promotion lists are still stuck in the Senate Foreign Relations Committee (SFRC) until heaven knows when. We have not been able to locate the  promotion lists for the midlevel ranks as of this writing. The promotion statistics will not be publicly available until published by State Magazine in mid-2016.

PN951-1 114th Congress (2015-2016) | STATE – Class of Career Minister (FE-CM); confirmed on 12/10/2015

The following-named Career Members of the Senior Foreign Service of the Department of State for promotion within the Senior Foreign Service to the class indicated: Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service of the United States of America, Class of Career Minister

James F. Entwistle Virginia
Brian A. Nichols California
Daniel R. Russel California

PN951-2 — 114th Congress (2015-2016) STATE — Class of Career Minister (FE-CM); currently pending in the SFRC.

The following-named Career Members of the Senior Foreign Service of the Department of State for promotion within the Senior Foreign Service to the class indicated: Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service of the United States of America, Class of Career Minister:

Richard Gustave Olson Jr. — Foreign Service

PN952 114th Congress (2015-2016) USAID – Class of Career-Minister (FE-CM); currently pending in the SFRC
The following-named Career Members of the Senior Foreign Service of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) for promotion within the Senior Foreign Service to the classes indicated: Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Career-Minister:

Cheryl L. Anderson Virginia
William R. Brands Arizona
Thomas R. Delaney Pennsylvania
Michael T. Harvey Texas
Brooke Andrea Isham Washington
Janina Anne Jaruzelski New Jersey
Charles E. North Virginia
Beth S. Paige Texas
Thomas H. Staal Maryland
Dennis J. Weller Illinois
Melissa A. Williams Virginia

PN000 114th Congress (2015-2016) STATE – Minister Counselor (FE-MC) — anyone promoted to this rank at the State Department?

PN953 114th Congress (2015-2016)  USAID – Class of Minister Counselor (FE-MC), currently pending in the SFRC).

The following-named Career Members of the Senior Foreign Service of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) for promotion within the Senior Foreign Service to the classes indicated: Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor:

Jennifer M. Adams Virginia
Rebecca R. W. Black New Mexico
Sherry Faith Carlin Florida
Nancy L. Estes Florida
Erin Elizabeth McKee Virginia
Leslie K. Reed California
John Mark Winfield Maryland

PN953114th Congress (2015-2016) STATE – Class of Counselor (FE-OC), currently pending in the SFRC.

The following-named Career Members of the Foreign Service for promotion into the Senior Foreign Service, as indicated: Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service of the United States of America, Class of Counselor:

Kathy E. Body Maryland
David G. Brown Maryland
Beverly A. Busa California
John J. Cardenas California
Sharon Thams Carter Florida
Katherine Ashton Crawford Maryland
Christopher M. Cushing Florida
Holly L. Ferrette Maryland
Ramona M. El Hamzaoui New Hampshire
Craig K. Hart Virginia
Mary Melinda Hobbs Missouri
Edith I. Houston Virginia
Barbara W. Hughes Connecticut
Elise M. Jensen Massachusetts
Karen D. Klimowski California
Julie A. Koenen California
Gary Linden Virginia
Marcia Musisi-Nkambwe Arizona
Anne Elizabeth Patterson District of Columbia
Evelyn Rodriguez Perez Florida
Leslie A. Perry Colorado
Patrick L. Robinson New Hampshire
Lawrence J. Sacks Missouri
Sheryl A. Stumbras Florida
Aye Aye Thwin Maryland
Christophe Andre Tocco California
Amy C. Tohill-Stull Virginia
Theresa G. Tuano Maryland
Peter A. Wiebler Virginia
Sunil Sebastian Xavier Virginia

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374 Foreign Service Promotions Confirmed as Senate Rushed Out For Easter Break

Posted: 2:17 am EDT
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After another lengthy wait, the U.S. Senate finally confirmed the promotion of 374 Foreign Service officers on March 27, 2015.  The Senate is now adjourned until April 13, 2015 where the wait for several more ambassadorial and regular FS nominees will presumably continue with no end in sight.

2015-03-27 PN69 Foreign Service

Nominations beginning Joyce A. Barr, and ending Nancy E. McEldowney, which 6 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on January 13, 2015.  The following-named Career Members of the Senior Foreign Service of the Department of State for promotion within the Senior Foreign Service to the class indicated: Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service of the United States of America, Class of Career Minister:

Joyce A. Barr

Robert F. Godec Jr.

Patricia M. Haslach

Paul Wayne Jones

Scot Alan Marciel

Nancy E. McEldowney

 

2015-03-27 PN70 Foreign Service/USAID

Nominations beginning Karen L. Freeman, and ending Monica Stein-Olson, which 5 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on January 13, 2015.

2015-03-27 PN71-1 Foreign Service

Nominations beginning Jeffrey N. Bakken, and ending Ellen Marie Zehr, which 37 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on January 13, 2015.

2015-03-27 PN72-1 Foreign Service

Nominations beginning Gregory Adams, and ending Todd R. Ziccarelli, which 177 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on January 13, 2015.

2015-03-27 PN230-1 Foreign Service

Nominations beginning Alexious Butler, and ending Naida Zecevic Bean, which 143 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on February 26, 2015.

2015-03-27 PN231 Foreign Service

Nominations beginning Adam Michael Branson, and ending Marc C. Gilkey, which 6 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on February 26, 2015.

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Related posts:

 

Confirmations: House Packing Officially On For Noah Mamet (Argentina), and Colleen Bell (Hungary)

— Domani Spero
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All that hand wringing whether or not controversial Obama bundlers would get to post or not this year ends today. On December 2, the U.S. Senate confirmed President Obama’s nominees for ambassadors to Argentina and Hungary.

Ambassador-Designate Noah Mamet would replace Vilma Martinez who served in Buenos Aires from 2009-2013.  He will soon take up residence at Palacio Bosch, the official residence of the U.S. Ambassador to Argentina designed by French architect René Sergent. The residence is considered Sergent’s finest work because of its stylistic unity and contextual relation to its environs, and according to State/OBO, was seminal to Argentine architectural taste.

Palacio Bosch via U.S. Embassy Buenos Aires

Palacio Bosch via U.S. Embassy Buenos Aires

The owner sold the residence to the United States Government in 1929 following recurrent propositions by U.S. Ambassador Robert Woods Bliss (Ambassador to Argentina from 1927-1933). Bliss, owner of Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C., who joined the Foreign Service in 1903 also purchased some of the furnishings, which he later donated to the residence. Major renovation of the building was undertaken in 1994. The Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations’ first totally historic restoration began, using many Argentine artisans and craftsmen who were direct descendants of the original experts. 40,000 ft² palace, lots of rooms but we don’t know the state of the bathrooms.

Embassy Buenos Aires acting ambassador has been Kevin K. Sullivan who began work as Chargé d’Affaires (a.i.) at the U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires since June 2013.  A career member of the U.S. Senior Foreign Service, he was posted previously in Argentina from 1997-2000.  The Embassy Buenos Aires is up to speed and has already announced the confirmation of the new ambassador on its website, almost as soon as it happened.

Ambassador-Designate Colleen Bell would replace Eleni Tsakopoulos Kounalakis, who served as Ambassador to Budapest from 2010-2013. Not sure where is the ambassador’s residence there but she will soon hold office at the building at Szabadságtér 12 in Budapest’s Fifth District which has been home to the United States Legation and Embassy since 1935. It was designed by the architects Aladár Kármán and Gyula Ullman, who were hired by a commercial company called the Hungarian Hall of Commerce, Ltd., who had purchased the site on May 16, 1899.  According to the U.S. Embassy in Budapest, during World War II, the Chancery Building operated under the Swiss Flag. There are stories that Jewish refugees were hidden in the lower levels of the building during the War. From November 4, 1956 to September 28, 1971, the Chancery also served as the home of Cardinal József Mindszenty, who took refuge there during the Hungarian Uprising of 1956. The Cardinal lived in what is now the Ambassador’s office.

Embassy Budapest’s second in command is M. André Goodfriend who has served as Deputy Chief of Mission since August 2013.  He previously served as the Consul General at the U.S. Embassy in Damascus, Syria, from August 2009 until the embassy suspended operations in February 2012.

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Senate Confirms Bassett (Paraguay), Bernicat (Bangladesh), Zumwalt (Senegal/GB), Allen (Brunei), Roebuck (Bahrain)

— Domani Spero
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  • Leslie Anne Bassett to be U.S. Ambassador to Paraguay.
  • Marcia Stephens Bloom Bernicat to be U.S. Ambassador to the People’s Republic of Bangladesh.
  • James Peter Zumwalt to be U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Senegal and U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Guinea-Bissau
  • Craig B. Allen to be U.S. Ambassador to Brunei Darussalam.
  • William V. Roebuck to be U.S. Ambassador to the Kingdom of Bahrain

Ambassador-designate James Zumwalt was nominated as Ambassador to the Republic of Senegal and the Republic of Guinea Bissau.  Embassy operations in Guinea Bissau had been suspended since  June 14, 1998. The U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Senegal is dual-hatted as the Ambassador to the Republic of Guinea-Bissau “to serve concurrently and without additional compensation” and is based in Dakar, Senegal.

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This is late, but here is the Senior Foreign Service Promotion List

— Domani Spero
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This is late, but we’ve only recently found the list from the congressional records.  We believed these were some of the nominees who were promoted last fall but did not get the Senate’s confirmation until April 2014.  See this for an explanation of the ranks in the Senior Foreign Service.

Nomination: PN1381-01-113
Date Received: January 30, 2014 (113th Congress)
Nominees: One hundred and ninety-three nominations, beginning with Gerald Michael Feierstein, and ending with David Michael Satterfield
Referred to: Senate Foreign Relations
Reported by: Senate Foreign Relations

Legislative Actions
Floor Action: January 30, 2014 – Received in the Senate and referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations.
Floor Action: April 10, 2014 – Reported by Senator Menendez, Committee on Foreign Relations, without printed report.
Floor Action: April 10, 2014 – Placed on Senate Executive Calendar. Calendar No. DESK.
Floor Action: April 11, 2014 – Confirmed by the Senate by Voice Vote.
Organization: Foreign Service

List of Nominees:

The following named Career Members of the Senior Foreign Service of the Department of State for promotion into and within the Senior Foreign Service to the classes indicated:

Career Members of the Senior Foreign Service of the United States of America, Class of Career Minister:

  • Gerald Michael Feierstein, of PA
  • Robert S. Ford, of MD
  • David M. Hale, of NJ
  • Stuart E. Jones, of VA
  • Linda Thomas-Greenfield, of LA

 

Career Members of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor:

  • Ronald D. Acuff, of FL
  • Douglas A. Allison, of VA
  • Marjorie Ann Ames, of FL
  • Whitney Young Baird, of NC
  • Erica Jean Barks-Ruggles, of VA
  • Kristen F. Bauer, of MA
  • Paul S. Beighley, of DC
  • Kate M. Byrnes, of FL
  • Floyd Steven Cable, of NY
  • Aubrey A. Carlson, of TX
  • Anne S. Casper, of NV
  • Todd Crawford Chapman, of TX
  • Karen Lise Christensen, of VA
  • Susan R. Crystal, of PA
  • Karen Bernadette Decker, of VA
  • Kathleen A. Doherty, of NY
  • Mary Dale Draper, of CA
  • Michael J. Fitzpatrick, of FL
  • Robert W. Forden, of CA
  • Jennifer Zimdahl Galt, of CO
  • Thomas Henry Goldberger, of NJ
  • Mark A. Goodfriend, of CA
  • Robert Daniel Griffiths, of NV
  • Kelii J. Gurfield, of WA
  • Peter David Haas, of FL
  • Daniel J. Hall, of TX
  • Dennis B. Hankins, of VA
  • Kathleen D. Hanson, of DC
  • Clifford Awtrey Hart, of VA
  • Jennifer Conn Haskell, of FL
  • Donald L. Heflin, of VA
  • Leo J. Hession, Jr., of CA
  • Catherine M. Hill-Herndon, of PA
  • Perry L. Holloway, of SC
  • John F. Hoover, of VA
  • Christine L. Hughes, of FL
  • Thomas J. Hushek, of DC
  • Michael Joseph Jacobsen, of TX
  • Julie Lynn Kavanagh, of VA
  • Michael Stanley Klecheski, of VA
  • Kent D. Logsdon, of FL
  • Matthew Robert Lussenhop, of MN
  • Michael William McClellan, of KY
  • Robin D. Meyer, of DC
  • Jonathan M. Moore, of IL
  • Wendela C. Moore, of VA
  • Kin Wah Moy, of NY
  • Warren Patrick Murphy, of VA
  • Julieta Valls Noyes, of FL
  • Larry G. Padget, Jr., of TX
  • Virginia E. Palmer, of VA
  • Beth A. Payne, of DC
  • Mary Catherine Phee, of DC
  • Claire A. Pierangelo, of CA
  • Lonnie J. Price, of VA
  • Robin S. Quinville, of CA
  • Elizabeth H. Richard, of TX
  • Adele E. Ruppe, of MD
  • Sue Ellen Saarnio, of VA
  • Christian J. Schurman, of VA
  • Kristen B. Skipper, of CA
  • Paul Randall Sutphin, of VA
  • Mara R. Tekach, of FL
  • Michael Stephen Tulley, of CA
  • David A. Tyler, of NH
  • Thomas Laszlo Vajda, of VA
  • James E. Vanderpool, of CA
  • Paul Dashner Wohlers, of WA
  • Steven Edward Zate, of FL
  • Timothy P. Zuniga-Brown, of NV

 

Career Members of the Senior Foreign Service of the United States of America, Class of Counselor:

  • Kelly Adams-Smith, of VA
  • Steven P. Adams-Smith, of VA
  • Jorgan Kendal Andrews, of VA
  • Virginia Meade Blaser, of VA
  • Scott Douglas Boswell, of DC
  • William Harvey Boyle, of AZ
  • Matthew Gordon Boyse, of CT
  • Bridget A. Brink, of DC
  • MaryKay Loss Carlson, of TX
  • James A. Carouso, of NY
  • Melissa Clegg-Tripp, of WA
  • Theodore R. Coley, of VA
  • Kelly Colleen Degnan, of CA
  • Leslie Stephen Degraffenried, of TX
  • Jill Derderian, of MD
  • Thomas M. Duffy, of CA
  • Stuart Anderson Dwyer, of ME
  • Andrew S. E. Erickson, of CA
  • Thomas R. Favret, of PA
  • Tara Feret, of VA
  • Patricia L. Fietz, of VA
  • Frank Jonathan Finver, of MD
  • Dehab Ghebreab, of VA
  • Paul G. Gilmer, of CA
  • Joshua D. Glazeroff, of VA
  • Anthony F. Godfrey, of VA
  • Katharina P. Gollner-Sweet, of VA
  • Francisco Javier Gonzales, of NJ
  • Laura Marlene Gould, of VA
  • Eric F. Green, of DC
  • Allen S. Greenberg, of TX
  • Michael Nicholas Greenwald, of CA
  • Henry Harrison Hand, of DC
  • Todd C. Holmstrom, of MI
  • Henry Victor Jardine, of VA
  • Lisa Anne Johnson, of VA
  • Elizabeth Jane Jordan, of FL
  • George P. Kent, of VA
  • John Stuart Kincannon, of DC
  • Michael B. Koplovsky, of NY
  • Steven Christopher Koutsis, of MA
  • Dale A. Largent, of WA
  • Laura Anne Lochman, of NC
  • James L. Loi, of CT
  • Theodore J. Lyng, of CT
  • Jean Elizabeth Manes, of FL
  • Andrew Cooper Mann, of WA
  • Carlos F. Matus, of MD
  • Wayne Amory McDuffy, of VA
  • David Slayton Meale, of VA
  • David Mees, of MD
  • Christopher Midura, of VA
  • Keith W. Mines, of NY
  • Sarah Craddock Morrison, of VA
  • Susan Butler Niblock, of MD
  • Karen L. Ogle, of MI
  • Kevin Michael O’Reilly, of VA
  • Inmi Kim Patterson, of NY
  • Brian Hawthorne Phipps, of FL
  • Thomas C. Pierce, of OR
  • John Mark Pommersheim, of FL
  • John Robert Post, of DC
  • Lynette Joyce Poulton, of CA
  • Timothy Joel Pounds, of NV
  • Jean E. Preston, of DC
  • Monique Valerie Quesada, of FL
  • David J. Ranz, of NY
  • David Reimer, of VA
  • Richard Henry Riley, IV, of VA
  • Lynn Whitlock Roche, of VA
  • Elizabeth Helen Rood, of VA
  • Kathryn M. Schalow, of VA
  • David Jonathan Schwartz, of VA
  • Dorothy Camille Shea, of DC
  • Adam Matthew Shub, of MD
  • Lynne P. Skeirik, of NH
  • Michael H. Smith, of NJ
  • Thomas D. Smitham, of MD
  • Andrew Snow, of NY
  • Sean B. Stein, of ID
  • James Kent Stiegler, of CA
  • Martina A. Strong, of TX
  • Stephanie Faye Syptak-Ramnath, of TX
  • Gregory Dean Thome, of WI
  • Laurence Edward Tobey, of NJ
  • Laurie Jo Trost, of VA
  • John Michael Underriner, of OH
  • Denise A. Urs, of TX
  • Peter Hendrick Vrooman, of NY
  • Gary S. Wakahiro, of CA
  • Jessica Webster, of DE
  • William J. Weissman, of CA
  • Eric Paul Whitaker, of CA
  • Frank J. Whitaker, of SC
  • Henry Thomas Wooster, of VA
  • Thomas K. Yazdgerdi, of FL
  • Paul Douglas Yeskoo, of VA
  • Marta Costanzo Youth, of MD

Career Members of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Counselor, and Consular Officers and Secretaries in the Diplomatic Service of the United States of America:

  • Raymond Bassi, of VA
  • Mark S. Butchart, of MD
  • Richard A. Capone, of VA
  • Janet A. Cote, of NV
  • Carolyn I. Creevy, of VA
  • Jill E. Darken, of IL
  • Bartle B. Gorman, of VA
  • Aleen Janice Grabow, of WI
  • Robert Allen Hall, of PA
  • Ralph A. Hamilton, of OH
  • Roger A. Herndon, of PA
  • Bruce J. Lizzi, of MD
  • David Lee Lyons, of MD
  • Michael M. Mack, of VA
  • Kathleen A. McCray, of VA
  • Alex G. McFadden, of FL
  • Beverly Doreen Rochester, of NV
  • Thomas Gerard Scanlon, of VA
  • Dean K. Shear, of VA

The following named Career Member of the Foreign Service of the Department of State for promotion within the Senior Foreign Service to the class indicated, effective October 12, 2008: Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service of the United States of America, Class of Career Minister:

David Michael Satterfield, of MO

Control Number: 113PN0138101

 

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USCG Karachi: Goodbye Michael Dodman, Hello Brian Heath

— Domani Spero
[twitter-follow screen_name=’Diplopundit’ ]

 

 

USCG Karachi’s Consul General Michael Dodman recently concluded his 2-year tour in Pakistan.  Here is a memorable photo of Mr. Dodman showing his dance moves at the historic Kot Diji Fort in the Khairpur District of Pakistan’s southeastern province of Sindh.

Photo via USCG Karachi/Flickr

Photo via USCG Karachi/Flickr

Brian Heath assumed charge as the U.S. Consul General in Karachi on August 20, 2014. USCG Karachi released the following official bio:
 A career member of the Senior Foreign Service, Mr. Heath most recently served as the Minister-Counselor for Management Affairs at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations in New York.
Since joining the Foreign Service in 1998, Mr. Heath’s overseas assignments have included Director of the U.S. Regional Embassy Office in Al Hillah, Iraq; Consul General at the U.S. Consulate in Lahore, Pakistan; Management Officer at the U.S. Consulate General in Karachi, Pakistan; General Services and Human Resources officers at the U.S. Embassy in Berlin, Germany; and Consular Officer at the U.S. Consulate General in Mumbai (Bombay), India.
In the course of several assignments in Washington, DC, Mr. Heath has studied at the National War College; worked as a Senior Advisor in the Under Secretary of State for Management’s Office of Management Policy; and served as a Special Assistant to the Assistant Secretary of State for Administration. Mr. Heath is the recipient of multiple Department of State Superior and Meritorious honor awards.
Mr. Heath graduated from Fordham University with a Bachelor’s degree in political economics, earned a law degree from Rutgers University, and received his Master’s degree in national security studies from the National War College. He is a member of the New Jersey and New York State bars.

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