@StateDept Reactions: Americans Convicted in Moscow (Outrage) and Manila (Silence Now Concern)

Updated: 10:45 am PST

 

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The Philippines Sends USG Notice of Military-Pact Termination #VFA #180days

 

Via Rappler (Philippines):

On Monday night, February 10, Duterte launched a fresh round of verbal tirades against the US saying while top officials, including President Donald Trump, were trying to salvage the VFA, he was bent on having it terminated. (EXPLAINER: Visiting Forces Agreement)

Duterte first broached his plan to terminate the VFA on January 23, after the US canceled the visa of Senator Ronald dela Rosa. Dela Rosa is Duterte’s first Philippine National Police chief known as the architect behind the government’s bloody anti-drug campaign.

The President later said he was serious about his decision, adding his choice to do so was anchored on US lawmakers’ moves to impose travel and financial restrictions on Philippine officials linked to the detention of opposition Senator Leila de Lima and alleged extrajudicial killings (EJKs) under the Duterte administration. (READ: Why the Global Magnitsky Act matters to the Philippines)

 

US Formally Returns #BalangigaBells to the Philippines

State Department’s Robert Palladino who “serves as the @StateDept Deputy Spokesperson under the leadership of the 70th Secretary of State @SecPompeo announced at the Daily Press Briefing, December 11, 2018 the formal return of the Balangiga Bells to the Philippines:

I am pleased to announce that on December 11th, the United States formally returned the bells of Balangiga to the Philippines in a handover ceremony in Manila attended by Philippine Secretary of National Defense Delfin Lorenzana and U.S. Ambassador to the Philippines Sung Kim. The decision follows an extensive consultative process with associated United States veterans organizations and state government officials in accordance with legislative – American legislative requirements to ensure appropriate steps are taken to preserve the history of American service members associated with the bells. Philippine Government officials will transport the bells to the church from which they were removed over 100 years ago, where they will be treated with respect and honor they deserve.

The return of the bells of Balangiga demonstrates the enduring strength of the United States-Philippines alliance and the deep bonds of friendship between the peoples of our nations as we work together to advance a free and open Indo-Pacific. From World War II to today’s struggle to defeat ISIS and the scourge of terrorism, our nations have stood side by side. As we close the painful chapter in our shared history, our relationship has withstood the test of time and flourishes today. As an ally and friend of the Philippines, we will forever honor and respect this shared history.

See our previous post: U.S. to Return the #BalangigaBells to the Philippines After 117 Years

U.S. to Return the #BalangigaBells to the Philippines After 117 Years

 

Via history.state.gov:

After its defeat in the Spanish-American War of 1898Spain ceded its longstanding colony of the Philippines to the United States in the Treaty of Paris. On February 4, 1899, just two days before the U.S. Senate ratified the treaty, fighting broke out between American forces and Filipino nationalists led by Emilio Aguinaldo who sought independence rather than a change in colonial rulers. The ensuing Philippine-American War lasted three years and resulted in the death of over 4,200 American and over 20,000 Filipino combatants. As many as 200,000 Filipino civilians died from violence, famine, and disease.
[…]
The war was brutal on both sides. U.S. forces at times burned villages, implemented civilian reconcentration policies, and employed torture on suspected guerrillas, while Filipino fighters also tortured captured soldiers and terrorized civilians who cooperated with American forces. Many civilians died during the conflict as a result of the fighting, cholera and malaria epidemics, and food shortages caused by several agricultural catastrophes.
[…]
In 1907, the Philippines convened its first elected assembly, and in 1916, the Jones Act promised the nation eventual independence. The archipelago became an autonomous commonwealth in 1935, and the U.S. granted independence in 1946.

The State Department’s historical site does not have an entry on the Balangiga Massacre. The U.S. History Scene has a piece on Remembering Balangiga and The War in the Philippines. It notes that the Philippine-American War lasted from 1899-1902 and that of the 126,468 American soldiers deployed to the Philippines—4,234 did not survive. An estimated 16,000 to 20,000 Filipino soldiers died, along with 200,000 civilians. Excerpt:

The American people were horrified when they heard that almost an entire company of men had been cut down by savage Filipino attackers. The Evening World claimed, “The slaughter is the most overwhelming defeat that American arms have encountered in the Orient.” They painted a gruesome picture: “so sudden and unexpected was the onslaught and so well hemmed in were they by the barbarians that the spot became a slaughter-pen for the little band of Americans.” It reignited support for war in the Philippines. The idea that Filipinos would hack a harmless company of men to death during breakfast reinforced the idea in the American consciousness that Filipinos were brutal, savage people. It reinforced the idea that Filipinos needed American colonialism in order to become civilized.
[…]
The Balangiga massacre gave officers the justification to pursue harsher methods.  General Jacob H. Smith led the charge in Samar. He gave the following instructions: “I want no prisoners. I wish you to kill and burn, the more you kill and burn the better you will please me. I want all persons killed who are capable of bearing arms in actual hostilities against the United States.” Major Littleton Waller asked to know the age limit, and Smith replied “Ten years.” These orders were immortalized in a cartoonin the New York Journal whose caption read: “Kill Every One Over Ten: Criminals because they were born ten years before we took the Philippines.” Smith asked his men to turn Samar into a “howling wilderness,” and they obliged.

Over the next year, the US Army practiced a scorched earth policy on Samar. They trudged through dangerous jungles, burning towns, taking food, and either killing the people or taking them to coastal villages for internment.  Thousands of Filipinos, mostly noncombatants, were killed during the Samar campaign. It became the most gruesome campaign of the entire Philippine-American War.

For the people who lived there, it was not the events of September 28, 1901, but what came after that was the true Balangiga “massacre.” Before leaving the island, American troops revisited Balangiga, where it all began. They took the church bells that signaled the attack on that day and sent them back to the United States as war trophies, where they still reside to this day.

Read in full here.

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Former U.S. Naval Attaché to US Embassy Manila Michael Brooks Sentenced in Navy Scandal

Posted: 2:35 am ET
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On June 16, 2017, USDOJ announced that a former U.S. Naval Attaché and Military Advisor to the U.S. Ambassador in the Philippines was sentenced for taking bribes in a massive U.S. Navy corruption scandal.

A Retired U.S. Navy Captain was sentenced in federal court today to 41 months in prison for his role in a massive bribery and fraud scheme involving foreign defense contractor Leonard Glenn Francis and his firm, Singapore-based, Glenn Defense Marine Asia (GDMA).

Acting Assistant Attorney General Kenneth A. Blanco of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, Acting U.S. Attorney Alana W. Robinson Southern District of California, Director Dermot O’Reilly of the Defense Criminal Investigative Service and Director Andrew Traver of the NCIS made the announcement.

In addition to the 41-month prison sentence, U.S. District Judge Janis L. Sammartino ordered Michael Brooks, 59, of Fairfax Station, Virginia, to pay a $41,000 fine and $31,000 in restitution to the U.S. Navy.  Brooks pleaded guilty in November 2016 to one count of conspiracy to commit bribery.

Brooks, who served as the U.S. Naval Attaché at the U.S. Embassy in Manila, Philippines, from 2006 to 2008, has admitted accepting bribes of travel and entertainment expenses, hotel rooms and the services of prostitutes. In return, Brooks admitted that he used his power and influence to benefit GDMA and Francis, including by securing quarterly clearances for GDMA vessels, which allowed GDMA vessels to transit into and out of the Philippines under the diplomatic imprimatur of the U.S. Embassy. Neither GDMA nor any other defense contractor has ever been granted such unfettered clearances.

Brooks admitted that he also allowed Francis to ghostwrite official U.S. Navy documents and correspondence, which Brooks submitted as his own. For example, Brooks admitted allowing GDMA to complete its own contractor performance evaluations. A November 2007 evaluation, drafted by GDMA and submitted by Brooks, described the company’s performance as “phenomenal,” “unsurpassed,” “exceptional” and “world class.” Brooks also admitted providing Francis with sensitive, internal U.S. Navy information, including U.S. Navy ship schedules and billing information belonging to a GDMA competitor, at times using a private Yahoo! e-mail account to mask his illicit acts.

Twenty-one current and former Navy officials have been charged so far in the fraud and bribery investigation; 10 have pleaded guilty and 10 cases are pending. In addition, five GDMA executives and GDMA the corporation have pleaded guilty.

NCIS, DCIS and DCAA are conducting the ongoing investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Mark W. Pletcher and Patrick Hovakimian of the Southern District of California and Assistant Chief Brian R. Young of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section are prosecuting the case.

Anyone with information relating to fraud, corruption or waste in government contracting should contact the NCIS anonymous tip line at www.ncis.navy.mil or the DOD Hotline at www.dodig.mil/hotline, or call (800) 424-9098.

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Top Philippine Diplomat Perfecto Yasay Ousted Over U.S. Citizenship Controversy

Posted: 3:02 am ET
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We have a second post on the Philippines, today.  On March 8, the country’s Commission of Appointments (CA) rejected the nomination of Perfecto Yasay Jr. as Secretary of Foreign Affairs. According to CNN, the committee unanimously decided to reject Yasay’s nomination “for lying under oath and that he failed to declare his U.S. citizenship in 1986.”

We’ve listed the FAM citations for renunciation of U.S.citizenship and loss of nationality in the links below. This should be an interesting case study.

Related items:

7 FAM 1280 | LOSS OF NATIONALITY AND TAKING UP A POSITION IN A FOREIGN GOVERNMENT

7 FAM 1260  | RENUNCIATION OF U.S. CITIZENSHIP ABROAD

7 FAM 1220  | DEVELOPING A LOSS-OF-NATIONALITY CASE

7 FAM 1200 APPENDIX B  | U.S. SUPREME COURT DECISIONS ON LOSS OF NATIONALITY

Secretary of State McCord Punches Philippine President in the Face, Embassy Protests – Seriously!

Posted: 1:54 am ET
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According to rappler.com, from July 1, 2016 to January 31, 2017, there have been over 7,000 deaths linked to the “war on drugs” in the Philippines – both from legitimate police operations and vigilante-style or unexplained killings (including deaths under investigation).  Photographer James Nachtwey did a series In Manila Death Comes by Night.  Local photographers are also documenting Duterte’s war on drugs in the Philippines. On March 6, the National Geographic’s Explorer started its 10th season with Episode 1 highlighting Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s violent war on drugs.

Meanwhile, in the fictional world, Madam Secretary is scheduled to air an episode entitled “Break in Diplomacy” on March 12.  In the trailer below, the series’ Secretary of State, Elizabeth McCord (Tea Leoni), is seen throwing a punch at a character Datu Andrada, the purported Philippine President in the show.  Apparently, after the fictional Philippine President  makes a sexually suggestive move at Secretary McCord during a private meeting, she punched and bloodied his nose. We have it in good authority that Secretary McCord did not/did not try to wash President Andrada’s mouth with Lifeboy soap.

On March 6, the Philippine Embassy in Washington, D.C. issued a statement protesting the um, “highly negative depiction” of the Philippine President in the episode.

The Philippine Embassy in Washington, D.C. wrote to CBS Corporation today, 06 March 2017, to strongly protest the highly negative depiction of a character purported to be the Philippine President on the next episode of the TV series Madam Secretary.

The trailer of Season 3 Episode 15 “Break in Diplomacy” shows the character – described in the episode’s synopsis as the “Philippines’ unconventional new president” – exhibiting inappropriate behavior towards the female lead character, US Secretary of State Elizabeth McCord.

The episode is scheduled to air on Sunday, 12 March 2017.

While Madam Secretary is a work of fiction, it tracks and mirrors current events. It is, therefore, inevitable that its depiction of world leaders will have an impact on how its audience views the real personages and the countries they represent. This highly negative portrayal of our Head of State not only casts doubt on the respectability of the Office of the Philippine President but also denigrates that way our nation navigates foreign affairs. It also tarnishes the Philippines’ longstanding advocacy for women’s rights and gender equality.

In view of the injurious effects that this program will have on the interests of the Philippines and the Filipino people, the Philippine Embassy urgently calls on CBS to take the necessary corrective actions.

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Related posts:

 

US Embassy Manila: Ambassador Sung Kim Presents His Credentials to President Duterte

Posted: 10:07 am PT
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On November 4, Ambassador Sung Kim was sworn-in by Secretary Kerry as the new ambassador to the Philippines (see Secretary @JohnKerry Swears-In Sung Kim as U.S. Ambassador to the #Philippines. He arrived in the Philippines last week; had burgers and fries with his residence and security staff and has already been to a basketball game.   On December 6, he presented his credentials to Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. Presidential Spokesman Ernesto Abella said the two spoke for around an hour without other officials in the room.  Ambassador Kim made a statement to the press at the Malacanang Palace after his meeting with the Philippine president.

 

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“Trump of the East” Gets an Invite to Visit the White House in 2017 #ikilledabout3people

Posted: 12:30 am  ET
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We blogged previously about the Philippines’ most unstatesmanlike president, Rodrigo Duterte. On December 3, Mr. Duterte said that he spoke with President-elect Donald J. Trump. According to the Philippine president, President-elect Trump told him that the Philippines was conducting its drug campaign “the right way.”  Local media reported that Duterte said of Trump: “He understood the way we are handling it and I said that there’s nothing wrong in protecting a country. It was a bit very encouraging in the sense that I supposed that what he really wanted to say was that, ‘we would be the last to interfere in the affairs of your own country.'”

President-elect Trump reportedly invited Mr. Duterte to visit him in the White House in 2017. According to rappler.com, the Philippine President also invited Mr. Trump to attend the 2017 Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit, which will be hosted by the Philippines next year.

Here’s a clip of the Philippine president telling a reporter that he killed about three people … (see the 2:16 mark).

View on YouTube. Check out the official channel here: https://www.youtube.com/user/LastWeek…

 

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Secretary @JohnKerry Swears-In Sung Kim as U.S. Ambassador to the #Philippines

Posted: 1:29 am ET
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Meanwhile, in the Philippines ….

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