Senate Confirmations: Bodde, Millard, Sievers, Malac, Peterson, Pittman, Barr

Posted: 7:48 pm EDT
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The Senate has now adjourned until 3:00pm on Monday, November 30, 2015.    There will be no more roll call votes. Prior to adjournment, the Senate confirmed a short list of nominees for ambassadors. It also confirmed Ann Calvaresi Barr as USAID Inspector General.

 

Confirmation of Executive Calendar #366, Peter William Bodde, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to Libya; confirmed: 95-0.

Bodde, Peter W. – Libya – August 2015

 

The Senate also confirmed the following nominations by voice vote:

Executive Calendar #367, Elisabeth I. Millard, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of Tajikistan.

Millard Elisabeth I. – Republic of Tajikistan – Jul7 2015

Executive Calendar #368, Marc Jonathan Sievers, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Sultanate of Oman.

Sievers, Marc Jonathan – Sultanate of Oman – July 2015

Executive Calendar #369, Deborah R. Malac, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of Uganda.

Malac Deborah R. – Republic of Uganda – September 2015

Executive Calendar #370, Lisa J. Peterson, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Kingdom of Swaziland.

(no Certificate of Competency posted at state.gov/hr)

Executive Calendar #371, H. Dean Pittman, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of Mozambique.

Pittman H. Dean – Republic of Mozambique – October 2015

 

UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Executive Calendar #344, Ann Calvaresi Barr, of Maryland, to be Inspector General, United States Agency for International Development.

 

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US Embassies Move Fourth of July For Heat, Monsoon Weather, and Now For Ramadan — Read Before Getting Mad

–Posted: 12:12 pm EDT
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American embassies hold Fourth of July festivities every year. This blog has followed those official celebrations through the last several years.  There is brewing controversy over the news that the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta had moved its Fourth of July celebration to June 4th this year to “avoid any conflict with the month-long Ramadan celebration.” Makes perfect sense to us. Before you get all mad, read on.

The Celebration of the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta’s 239th Anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America  Photo credit: State Dept./Erik A. Kurniawan

The Celebration of the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta’s 239th Anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America with Ambassador Blake and guests
Photo credit: State Dept./Erik A. Kurniawan

This is certainly not the first time that an embassy had moved its Fourth of July celebration to a different date.  In 2012, the US Embassy in Oman celebrated our 236th year of independence in February that year. We were once told that heat is the reason for these early 4th of July  celebrations at various overseas posts. At one EUR  post, we heard that it was the heat and the fact that most government officials leave the capital city in July. In 2013 and again in 2014, the US Embassy in Nepal celebrated July 4th three months earlier, in March “in the hopes of escaping monsoon weather.”

So yes, our diplomatic posts overseas have moved these independence day celebrations due to heat, monsoon weather, and now, Ramadan. And this is probably not the first time an embassy has done this, and it will not be the last.

Ramadan this year begins the evening of June 17 and ends the evening of July 17.  During this time, many Muslims will observe a pre-fast meal before dawn. At sunset, they  will have their fast-breaking meal.  On July 4th, in Muslim host countries like Indonesia, the red, white and blue cake will not be first on their minds when they break their fast for their first meal of the day since dawn.

Here’s where we pause for a reminder that these Fourth of July celebrations are official functions typically hosted by our embassies for host country nationals and contacts. There is every need to accommodate local sensitivities and realities.

Or there will be no one in attendance.

But what about American citizens, you say; can’t they just party among themselves? They can for private celebrations, of course. But the diplomatic Fourth of July celebration has an official function and purpose, which is (like all representational functions), to provide for the proper representation of the United States, and further foreign policy objectives.

The Department of State Standardized Regulations also dictates that embassy representational allowance may not be used for “expenses of recreation and entertainment solely for employees of the Executive Branch of the United States Government and their families” (5 U.S.C. 5536).  That’s right. Uncle Sam will throw a thunderbolt at an embassy that hosts representational events/functions for its American employees or American citizens alone.  Regulations require that “U.S. presence, official and private, must be less than half the total guest list.”

In fact, 3 FAM 3246.3 spells this quite clearly: “Since representation relationships are established and maintained primarily with host-country officials and private citizens, guest lists for representation events must reflect minimum guest-ratio guidelines set by the chief of mission for each type of representation function (rarely more than 50 percent U. S. Government executive branch employees) to ensure that representative cross sections are invited.”

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Related posts:

Photo of the Day: Who put the genie in the lamp?

— Domani Spero
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Via state.gov

 Shopkeeper Offers Oil Lamp as Secretary Kerry Pays Visit to Muttrah Souk in Oman A shopkeeper offers an oil lamp to U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry as he visits the Muttrah Souk - a traditional bazaar - in Muscat, Oman, on November 10, 2014, during a break in P5+1 negotiations with Iran about the future of its nuclear program. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]


Shopkeeper Offers Oil Lamp as Secretary Kerry Pays Visit to Muttrah Souk in Oman
A shopkeeper offers an oil lamp to U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry as he visits the Muttrah Souk – a traditional bazaar – in Muscat, Oman, on November 10, 2014, during a break in P5+1 negotiations with Iran about the future of its nuclear program. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

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Open Season: This Year’s July 4th Independence Day Celebrations Officially On

— Domani Spero

Actually no, the season officially opened last month when U.S. Embassy Kathmandu celebrated the 238th Anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America on February 22, 2014. Nepal’s Vice President Paramananda Jha was the main guest at the event.  According to Ambassador Peter W. Bodde’s prepared speech, this was the second year the embassy celebrated July 4th early “in the hopes of escaping monsoon weather.”  Also, they chose this week “because in February we honor the birthdays of two of our great presidents, George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.” Eleven members of the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force Band based in Okinawa, Japan entertained the guests at the chief of mission residence. More photos are available here.

Photo via US Embassy Nepal

Photo via US Embassy Nepal

Photo via US Embassy Nepal February 21, 2014

Photo via US Embassy Nepal
February 21, 2014

 

So, US Embassy Nepal had officially bumped off US Embassy Muscat for the first July 4th celebration of 2014.  On March 25, 2014, the US Embassy in Oman hosted its 238th Independence Day event.  According to ONA, Greta Christine Holtz, the US ambassador to the Sultanate gave a speech during which she affirmed the deep-rooted relations binding Omanis and Americans.  In 2013, the embassy celebrated July 4th on May 24. More photos available here. In 2012, we did, Chew on This: US Embassy Oman Celebrates 4th of July (in February) with Fast Food Sponsors.  It looks like they no longer display prominently the event’s corporate sponsors.

Photo via US Embassy Muscat

Photo via US Embassy Muscat

 

This year, we hope to do a Fourth of July fashion or food round-up.  Give us a heads up if you have something interesting at post.

 

 

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