Snapshot: Discretionary spending by the federal government, FY2016

Posted: 2:38 am  ET
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Via the Congressional Budget Office, February 2017:

Discretionary Spending is spending that lawmakers control through annual appropriation acts. Below is a breakdown of discretionary spending for FY2016 (October 1, 2015 – September 30, 2016).

  • $1.2 Trillion | Discretionary spending by the federal government in 2016
  • $584 Billion ($0.6 Trillion) | Spending on national defense, which accounted for nearly half of the discretionary total, in 2016
  • $52 Billion | International Affairs, which accounted for the smallest nondefense spending
Via CBO

Via CBO

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Snapshot: @StateDept Aid Allocation by Region and Top Recipients, FY2016 Request

Posted: 3:06 am  ET
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Via CRS

Under the FY2016 request, top foreign assistance recipients would not differ significantly from FY2014 (FY2015 country data are not yet available). Israel would continue to be the top recipient, with a requested $3.1 billion (level with FY2014) in Foreign Military Financing (FMF) funds, followed by Afghanistan, for which $1.5 billion was requested (a 28% increase from FY2014). Egypt would receive $1.5 billion (-3% from FY2014), largely in FMF to support shared security interests, and Jordan would get $1.0 billion (-1% from FY2014) to promote security and stability in the region as well as address economic and security strains related to the crisis in Syria. Pakistan would get $804 million (a 10% cut from FY2014), to continue ongoing efforts to increase stability and prosperity in the region. Other top recipients include Kenya ($630 million), Nigeria ($608 million), Tanzania ($591 million), and other African nations that are focus countries for HIV/AIDS programs. A new addition to the top recipient list under the request would be Ukraine, for which $514 million was requested (snip).

Below is the proposed FY2016 foreign operations budget allocations by region and country.

top-recipients-fy2016-request

Funding allocation among regions would change slightly under the FY2016 request compared with FY2014 (FY2015 regional data are not yet available), with Europe/Eurasia and the Western Hemisphere increasing their share by 2% each as a result of proposed funding for Ukraine and Central America. Africa’s share of aid funding would decline by about 5% from FY2014 estimates.

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@StateDept Gets Exemption From Trump Federal Hiring Freeze, March Classes Are On

Posted: 2:07 am  ET
Updated: 2:27 pm PT
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The AP’s Matt Lee reports that the State Department was granted an exemption from the Trump administration’s hiring freeze on most federal employees. It will bring on 175 new diplomats: 70 entry-level diplomats, 80 mid-level specialists and 25 consular fellows, non-foreign service officers who assist visa processing at U.S. embassies and consulates abroad.

The report says that the State Department has been granted an exemption from the Trump hiring freeze. The number only includes a fraction of the projected hires this year for the Foreign Service.  The State Department has projected 615 positions for FY16 which includes 97 new positions and 518 projected total attrition (employees lost to retirement, resignation, death). Total hiring for FY17 is projected at 599 with 98 new positions and 501 projected total attrition.

It looks like this exemption affects only the March classes scheduled to start on March 6 for FS officers,  and March 20 for FS specialists (see @StateDept Sends Out Job Offers to Prospective FSOs For March 6 Class But — Will There Be Jobs?).  Beyond these positions, it appears that the hiring freeze is on, including a halt in the hiring of eligible family members. 

There are classes scheduled for July and September but it appears no invitations have gone out for those classes.  The State Department’s careers.gov says, “We do not yet have information regarding hiring authority for future classes. This is not unusual.”  We anticipate that the OPM plan required after 90 days under the federal hiring freeze executive order will be available by then.

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Congress Sends President Obama First State Department Authorization in 14 Years

Posted: 1:21 am ET
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Last week, we blogged that S.1635 the State Department authorization bill was marching to the finish line (see S.1635 ‘Department of State Authorities Act Fiscal Year 2017’ Marches to the Finish Line). On Saturday, December 10, the U.S. Senate unanimously approved S.1635, legislation referred to the Senate earlier from the House of Representatives where lawmakers apparently incorporated provisions from State Department authorization bills for fiscal years 2016 and 2017 . This is the first State Department authorization bill sent by Congress to the President in 14 years. Below is the statement from SFRC Chairman Bob Corker:

U.S. Senator Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, today announced that for the first time in 14 years, a State Department authorization bill will be sent to the president’s desk to be signed into law. Today, the Senate unanimously approved S.1635, legislation referred to the Senate earlier this week from the House of Representatives where lawmakers incorporated provisions from State Department authorization bills for fiscal years 2016 and 2017, which were authored by Corker and Senator Ben Cardin (D-Md.), ranking member of the committee.

“Today, Congress ends a 14-year drought by finally sending a State Department authorization to the president,” said Corker. “Restoring Congress’ rightful role in the conduct of U.S. engagement overseas has been a top priority of mine as chairman. I thank Senator Cardin for his partnership and appreciate the bipartisan cooperation and contributions of my committee colleagues and our counterparts in the House in renewing this important oversight process on behalf of American taxpayers. Among other provisions, this legislation will enhance the security of our embassies abroad, improve personnel and organizational practices of the State Department, and demand much needed oversight and accountability of U.N. peacekeeping missions to end horrific cases of sexual abuse and exploitation. Going forward, I am hopeful we can build even further on this important progress to ensure State Department funding is used in the most responsible manner to advance American interests.”

A summary of S.1635 is available here or read it below:

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S.1635: Title VI – Management and Accountability (FY2016)

Posted: 5:50 pm PT
Updated: May 3, 10:14 pm PT
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S.1635 Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016 passed the Senate by unanimous consent on April 28, 2016. (See Whoa! Senate Passes @StateDept Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, FY2016).  Below is Part 6 of 6 extracted from thomas.gov congress.gov for easier reading (oh, joy, the links timeout!). See below on what’s included but read the bill via congressional record in PDF or as TEXT here as alternative sources.


Sec. 601. Short title.

Sec. 602. Competitive hiring status for former employees of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction.

Sec. 603. Assurance of independence of IT systems.

Sec. 604. Protecting the integrity of internal investigations.

Sec. 605. Report on Inspector General inspection and auditing of Foreign Service posts and bureaus and operating units Department of State.

 

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Related sections:

Part 1: S.1635: Title I – @StateDept Authorities and Activities (FY2016)
Part 2: S.1635: TITLE II–Organization and Personnel of the Department of State (FY2016)
Part 3: S.1635: TITLE III – International Organizations (FY2016)
Part 4: S.1635: Title IV – Consular Authorities (FY2016)
Part 5: S.1635: Title V – Embassy Security (FY2016)

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S.1635: Title V – Embassy Security (FY2016)

Posted: 5:47 pm PT
Updated: May 3, 10:12 pm PT
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S.1635 Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016 passed the Senate by unanimous consent on April 28, 2016. (See Whoa! Senate Passes @StateDept Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, FY2016). Below is Part 5 of 6 extracted from thomas.gov congress.gov for easier reading (oh, joy, the links timeout!). See below on what’s included but read the bill via congressional record in PDF or as TEXT here as alternative sources.


Sec. 501. Worldwide security protection.

Sec. 502. Embassy security, construction and maintenance.


Sec. 511. Local guard contracts abroad under diplomatic security program.

Sec. 512. Disciplinary action resulting from unsatisfactory leadership in relation to a security incident.

Sec. 513. Management and staff accountability.

Sec. 514. Security enhancements for soft targets.


Sec. 521. Additional reports on expansion and enhancement of Marine Corps Security Guard Program.


Sec. 531. Designation and reporting for high threat, high risk posts.

Sec. 532. Designation and reporting for high-risk counterintelligence threat posts.

Sec. 533. Enhanced qualifications for Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for high threat, high risk posts.

Sec. 534. Security environment threat list briefings.

Sec. 535. Comptroller General of the United States report on implementation of Benghazi Accountability Review Board recommendations.

Sec. 536. Foreign Affairs Security Training Center.

Sec. 537. Language training.


Sec. 541. Provision of copies of accountability review board reports to Congress.

Sec. 542. Staffing.

 

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Related sections:

Part 1: S.1635: Title I – @StateDept Authorities and Activities (FY2016)
Part 2: S.1635: TITLE II–Organization and Personnel of the Department of State (FY2016)
Part 3: S.1635: TITLE III – International Organizations (FY2016)
Part IV: S.1635: Title IV – Consular Authorities (FY2016)

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S.1635: Title IV – Consular Authorities (FY2016)

Posted: 5:41 pm PT
Updated: May 3, 10:07 pm PT
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S.1635 Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016 passed the Senate by unanimous consent on April 28, 2016. (See Whoa! Senate Passes @StateDept Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, FY2016).  Below is Part 4 of 6 extracted from thomas.gov congress.gov for easier reading (oh, joy, the links timeout!). See below on what’s included but read the bill via congressional record in PDF or as TEXT here as alternative sources.


Sec. 401. Visa ineligibility for international child abductors.

Sec. 402. Presumption of immigrant intent for H and L visa classifications.

Sec. 403. Visa information sharing.

 

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Related sections:

Part 1: S.1635: Title I – @StateDept Authorities and Activities (FY2016)
Part 2: S.1635: TITLE II–Organization and Personnel of the Department of State (FY2016)
Part 3: S.1635: TITLE III – International Organizations (FY2016)

Related posts:

S.1635: TITLE III – International Organizations (FY2016)

Posted: 5:37 pm PT
Updated: May 3, 9:57 pm PT
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S.1635 Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016 passed the Senate by unanimous consent on April 28, 2016. (See Whoa! Senate Passes @StateDept Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, FY2016).  Below is Part 3 of 6 extracted from thomas.gov for easier reading (oh, joy, the links timeout!). See below on what’s included but read the bill via congressional record in PDF or as TEXT here as alternative sources.


Sec. 301. Reports concerning the United Nations.

Sec. 302. Annual report on financial contributions to international organizations.

Sec. 303. Report on peacekeeping arrears, credits, and contributions.

Sec. 304. Assessment rate transparency.


Sec. 311. Preventing abuse in peacekeeping.

Sec. 312. Inclusion of peacekeeping abuses in country report on human rights practices.

Sec. 313. Evaluation of United Nations peacekeeping missions.


Sec. 321. Encouraging employment of United States citizens at the United Nations.

Sec. 322. Ensuring appropriate United Nations personnel salaries.

 

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Related sections:

Part 1: S.1635: Title I – @StateDept Authorities and Activities (FY2016)
Part 2: S.1635: TITLE II–Organization and Personnel of the Department of State (FY2016)

 

Related posts:

 

 

S.1635: TITLE II–Organization and Personnel of the Department of State (FY2016)

Posted: 5:31 pm PT
Updated: May 3, 9:57 pm PT
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S.1635 Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016 passed the Senate by unanimous consent on April 28, 2016. (See Whoa! Senate Passes @StateDept Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, FY2016).  Below is Part 2 of 6 extracted from thomas.gov for easier reading (oh, joy, the links timeout!). See below on what’s included but read the bill via congressional record in PDF or as TEXT here as alternative sources.

 


Sec. 201. Rightsizing accountability.

Sec. 202. Integration of foreign economic policy.

Sec. 203. Review of Bureau of African Affairs and Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs jurisdictions.

Sec. 204. Special envoys, representatives, advisors, and coordinators.

Sec. 205. Conflict prevention, mitigation and resolution, and the inclusion and participation of women.

Sec. 206. Information technology system security.

Sec. 207. Analysis of embassy cost sharing.

Sec. 208. Parent advisory committee to the Interagency Working Group to Prevent International Parental Child Abduction.

Sec. 209. Improving research and evaluation of public diplomacy.

Sec. 210. Enhanced institutional capacity of the Bureau of African Affairs.


Sec. 211. Review of Foreign Service Officer compensation.

Sec. 212. Repeal of recertification requirement for senior Foreign Service.

Sec. 213. Compensatory time off for travel.

Sec. 214. Certificates of demonstrated competence.

Sec. 215. Foreign Service assignment restrictions.

Sec. 216. Security clearance suspensions.

Sec. 217. Economic statecraft education and training.

Sec. 218. Report on diversity recruitment, employment, retention, and promotion.

Sec. 219. Expansion of the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program, the Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program, and the Donald M. Payne International Development Fellowship Program.

Sec. 220. Retention of mid- and senior-level professionals from underrepresented groups.

Sec. 221. Review of jurisdictional responsibilities of the Special Representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan and the Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs.

Sec. 222. Congressional notification of countries compliance with minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking.

Sec. 223. International religious freedom training program.
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Related sections:

Part 1: S.1635: Title I – @StateDept Authorities and Activities (FY2016)

 

Related posts:

 

 

 

S.1635: Title I – @StateDept Authorities and Activities (FY2016)

Posted: 5:27 pm PT
Updated: May 3, 9:57 pm PT
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S.1635 Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016 passed the Senate by unanimous consent on April 28, 2016. (See Whoa! Senate Passes @StateDept Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, FY2016).  Below is Part 1 of 6 extracted from thomas.gov for easier reading (oh, joy, the links timeout!). See below on what’s included but read the bill via congressional record in PDF or as TEXT here as alternative sources.


Sec. 101. American spaces review.

Sec. 102. Identifying bilateral investment treaty opportunities.

Sec. 103. Reinstatement of Hong Kong report.

Sec. 104. Interagency hostage recovery coordinator.

Sec. 105. United States-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue review.

Sec. 106. Report on human rights violations in Burma.

Sec. 107. Combating anti-semitism.

Sec. 108. Biotechnology grants.

Sec. 109. Definition of “use” in passport and visa offenses.

Sec. 110. Science and technology fellowships.

Sec. 111. Name changes.

Sec. 112. Anti-piracy information sharing.

Sec. 113. Report reform.

Sec. 114. Sense of Congress on the United States alliance with Japan.

Sec. 115. Sense of Congress on the defense relationship between the United States and the Republic of India.

Sec. 116. Sense of Congress on the United States alliance with the Republic of Korea.

Sec. 117. Sense of Congress on the relationship between the United States and Taiwan.

Sec. 118. Report on political freedom in Venezuela.

Sec. 119. Strategy for the Middle East in the event of a comprehensive nuclear agreement with Iran.

Sec. 120. Department of State international cyberspace policy strategy.

Sec. 121. Waiver of fees for renewal of immigrant visa for adopted child in certain situations.

Sec. 122. Sense of Congress on anti-Israel and anti-Semitic incitement within the Palestinian Authority.

Sec. 123. Support for the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity, and inviolability of post-Soviet countries in light of Russian aggression and interference.

Sec. 124. Russian propaganda report.

Sec. 125. Approval of export licences and letters of request to assist the Government of Ukraine.


Sec. 131. Atrocities prevention board.

Sec. 132. United States engagement in the Indo-Pacific.

Sec. 133. Joint action plan to combat prejudice and discrimination and to foster inclusion.

Sec. 134. Report on developing country debt sustainability.

Sec. 135. United States strategy to prevent and respond to gender-based violence globally.

Sec. 136. International corruption and accountability.

Sec. 137. Quadrennial diplomacy and development review.

Sec. 138. Disappeared persons in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador.

Sec. 139. Report on implementation by the Government of Bahrain of recommendations from the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry.

Sec. 140. Report on United States humanitarian assistance to Haiti and whether recent elections in Haiti meet international election standards.

Sec. 141. Sense of Congress with respect to the imposition of additional sanctions against the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

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