Nicaragua Crisis Escalates as Ortega Regime Continues Targeting of Anti-Govt Protesters

 

The State Department updated its Travel Advisory for Nicaragua on July 6, 2018 to Level 3 urging that U.S. travelers reconsider travel to Nicaragua due to crime, civil unrest, and limited healthcare availability.  The update also includes the announcement that the U.S. government has ordered the departure of non-emergency U.S. government personnel in the country and that while the U.S. Embassy remains open, it can only provide emergency services for U.S. citizens.

According to the Miami Herald, the Organization of American States’ Inter-American Human Rights Commission puts the number of dead since April 18 at 264, while Nicaragua’s Pro-Human Rights Association puts the figure at 309 people and thousands of wounded.

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@StateDept Shows “We Care About Diplomatic Spouses” By Creating Jobs Few Can Fill

Posted: 12:54 am PT

 

When you hear that people are besides themselves … because in the latest Expanded Professional Associates Program (EPAP) qualifications round, posts don’t have anyone who qualified for anything because the qualifications bars are set too damn high. Is this the State Department’s way of showing “we care about spouses” so we created 400 new jobs but “don’t blame us” if you can’t qualify for these jobs (that were purposely designed to screen out just about everyone)?

For more about the EPAP program and the new qualification standards introduced under Tillerson’s tenure but now carried over under Pompeo’s watch, see below:

Oh, but if you’re a family member and have an MA/MS in Business or Public Administration with a concentration in Accounting or Finance and no specialized experience, HURRY! There is a vacancy waiting just for you at the US Embassy in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire as  a financial management professional associate (FP-03).  The good news is they’ve updated this requirement in February 2018. In January, they previously required that the financial management position at the FP-03 level must have a Ph.D. in Business or Public Administration, a requirement that they do not even ask of Financial Management Officer candidates.  But hey spouses are special, right?

Also a bonus tweet for everyone who are the “unsung heroes” of the State Department from the Acting Director General of the Foreign Service:

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Diplomatic Spouse Martin Cooke Rescues Drowning Tourist in Western Australia

Posted: 2:27 am  ET

 

Western Australia’s Esperance Express reported in early March that “brave actions saved the life of a drowning tourist” after he was caught in a rip current at Twilight Cove in Western Australia.

Around 4:30pm on Sunday March 4, 2018, American tourist Martin Cooke was swimming when he spotted a man waving in distress.

“I saw a guy waving and at first I thought he was just having fun, waving at somebody else, but then I noticed that a guy a little distance from him was signalling all kinds of trouble,” Mr Cooke said.
“So I swam out to that guy as quick as I could, and by the time I got out to him he was under, so I just grabbed him by the shirt and pulled him above the water.

 

Martin Cooke is the spouse of American Consul General Rachel Cooke who was on official visit in the area. Esperance located on the south east coast of Western Australia is under U.S. Consulate General Perth‘s consular district.  According to its website, the first U.S. consular official in Western Australia was posted to Fremantle in 1886, with the first Consul General appointed to the State’s capital of Perth in 1937.  Western Australia is the country’s biggest state and occupies the entire western third of the country, with a population of approximately 2.6 million. The consular district of Western Australia has around 15,000 U.S. citizens at any one time.

About that day of the incident, Martin said: “[T]hat’s what we were doing in Esperance. She went to work there and in the nearby town of Albany the week of March 5th, and we went down early to enjoy the weekend since we’d never been there before. We were out at a beach near town when I pulled Francis from the water — he and his friends were having a tough time in the strong current, and I was lucky to be in the right place at the right time. He also lives in Perth and we’re in touch via email now — we plan to meet up with him and his family soon to catch up.”

Martin whose background is IT has been a diplomatic spouse for 16 years. He told us, “I’ve been lucky to be able to continue in that line of work for most of my time as an EFM — that included [tours] in Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia, Kabul, Tajikistan, and then in Herat in western Afghanistan.” He was “the very first EFM in a field location in a war zone ever.” While his FSO did back-to-back assignments in DC, Martin was also able to work with the content management team at the Washington Post.

He is currently into drone photography and videography. Check out his gorgeous photos from  Esperance and please give Consulate  Perth’s Facebook page some love.

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Digital Media Publisher Seeks Finance Editor #EFMJobs #EUR #Telecommuting

Posted: 4:18 am ET

 

SmartBrief is a digital media publisher of targeted business news and information by industry. It publishes more than 200 niche e-mail newsletters in partnership with leading trade associations and professional societies. One of its directors who manages a team of business news writers/editors reached out to us because he was looking for talent in time zones outside the United States and at diplomatic spouses in particular as a potential talent pool.  We’re sharing a job post for a full time job below (we are not paid to do this, we’re looking at the possibility of expanding on job leads in the future as a service to our EFM readers).  We may be able to share job leads for part-time jobs in the future if there is a good response. Check this out and send us feedback when you can.

Finance Editor (Overnight)

Job Description
SmartBrief seeks full-time finance editor — midnight to 8 a.m. EST weekdays

Can you condense the day’s most important news into a roundup of two-sentence summaries?

Can you work with association and corporate clients to deliver quality newsletters that keep their industries informed?

Can you meet multiple daily deadlines?

Then you’re the person for us!

SmartBrief is seeking a full-time finance editor for daily email newsletters covering global financial news. Candidates would need to be available to work between midnight and 8 a.m. EST Monday through Friday.

This is a TELECOMMUTING position. Candidates based in Europe are strongly encouraged to apply.

What we’re looking for: Someone who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-intensive, newsroom-style work environment. The ideal candidate has worked as a finance writer or editor for a newspaper, trade journal or industry publication with multiple daily deadlines. Candidates with experience in corporate communications at a financial services firm will also be considered. Knowledge of industry trends and global financial regulatory reform initiatives would be a HUGE plus. Our briefs summarize the top stories of the day for dozens of industry associations, and our editors work with freelancers to shape that content.

Applicants will be asked to complete timed writing and editing tests.

Job Duties:

  • Identify news stories for inclusion in SmartBrief’s finance and business newsletters.
  • Edit news summaries for grammar, style and tone for a particular audience.
  • Use online publishing tools to create email newsletters and other content.
  • Manage relationships with associations, corporations and other business clients as well as freelance writers and other content providers.

Required Skills & Experience:

  • Proven writing and editing skills. Alternative: Three to five years of experience in a communications or research role with a news organization, consulting firm, trade association or other relevant group.
  • Ability to write and edit quickly and accurately on deadline.
  • Sophisticated understanding of how to find news and information on the Web.
  • Facility for using online publishing tools.
  • Knowledge of Associated Press style.
  • Strong interpersonal and communications skills.
  • Proven record of sharing responsibilities and managing multiple projects/deadlines simultaneously.

About SmartBrief:

Founded in 1999, SmartBrief is the leader in customized e-mail news services and reaches top-flight executives in a variety of markets, including advertising, retail, hospitality, telecom, health care and consumer packaged goods. We’re expanding rapidly and looking for exceptional, motivated individuals to join our team. At SmartBrief, employees enjoy an entrepreneurial work environment with accelerated advancement opportunities. SmartBrief is proud to be an equal opportunity employer.

Job Location
Telecommute (Candidates based in Europe are strongly encouraged to apply.), , United States
Position Type
Full-Time/Regular

See the original job post and application page here.

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@StateDept Publishes EPAP Positions Available Now/Summer 2018 #Feb20Lists #EFMs

Posted: 2:30 am ET

 

On February 20, the State Department through its Family Liaison Office published the 2018 Spring/Summer positions available under the Expanded Professional Associates Program (EPAP). EPAP is different from other family member employment opportunities in that it has portfolios similar to Foreign Service entry-level positions. EPAP positions are also centrally funded by the Department of State (not post funded) and are administered by the appropriate Washington regional or functional bureau. Last month, the State Department also released its new qualification standards (PDF), and required previously qualified employees/applicants to re-qualify for these jobs (see @StateDept Releases New Strategery For Diplomatic Spouse Professional Employment #Ugh).

Via State/FLO:

Each of the regional bureaus and IRM are creating a list of EPAP positions that are available now and that are expected to become available through summer 2018. These positions will soon be advertised via a vacancy announcement on USAJOBS.gov. Positions that are not filled through this announcement or that become available in fall/winter 2018 will be advertised at a later date.

Appointment Eligible Family Members (AEFMs) who would like to be considered for one or more positions are required to submit an application. AEFMs may only submit applications for positions that are available at their sponsor’s post of assignment. They must either already be at post or be arriving at post within six months of the EPAP advertisement. AEFMs must be able to work at least one full year in the position from the time of hire.

2018 Spring/Summer Positions

Note: Medical positions for all bureaus outside of NEA and SCA will be added soon. Position lists are subject to change; check back often for updates.

Lists as of February 20, 2018:

Each bureau can only fill up to the number of vacant positions allocated. More positions than the number actually available are advertised to give maximum flexibility to both applicants and bureaus in seeking good matches for the positions.

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Related posts:

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Unemployment Status of @StateDept Family Members Overseas (Fall 2017)

Posted: 4:25 am ET

 

On February 13, Foreign Policy did a piece on Tillerson’s hiring freeze of Eligible Family Members (EFM) at the State Department and how even as the freeze ends, it “left resentment in its wake.”

“It’s been months,” said one department official speaking on condition of anonymity, “and still no one understands what is going on with EFMs.”

The confusion could be cleared up soon with concrete steps Tillerson is expected to take this month. Tillerson has authorized an additional 2,449 EFM positions to the State Department payroll, effectively lifting the prior hiring freeze, a department spokesman said. He also plans to expand a selective pool of jobs for highly educated family members, known as the Expanded Professional Associates Program, from some 200 to 400 positions.

“This should put us back to normal hiring levels” for diplomats’ family members, the spokesman told Foreign Policy.

Read the full piece here.

First, on that EPAP expansion that supposed to expand professional opportunities from some 200 to 400 positions, read our recent post: @StateDept Releases New Strategery For Diplomatic Spouse Professional Employment #Ugh.  Previously qualified applicants must re-qualify to be eligible under the new standards; they will not be grandfathered into the new program. EFMs on EPAP position are taking jobs that are comparable in duties and responsibilities to career FSOs and FS Specialists, but in some cases, the standard required for EFMs to qualify are higher than those required of FSOs/FSSs. We’ve already heard that some posts will not be requesting EPAP positions. We’d be interested to know what is the fill rate of this program by end of FY2018.

Second, the FP piece citing a department spox says that “Tillerson has authorized an additional 2,449 EFM positions to the State Department payroll effectively lifting the prior hiring freeze.”

That “additional” number got our attention because despite years of effort, the number of EFM jobs has always been problematic, and given Tillerson’s track record, we frankly have low expectation that he will expand or provide something “additional” to a situation that he made worse on his first year on the job.

When we asked about this, the reporter told us “State won’t give us a clear answer – in large part because its hard to track exact number as FSOs cycle to new posts. Best we got was its ‘returning to normal levels.’ Rough estimate: 884 EFMs waived by RT + the 2449 new ones = 3333, a bit below Fall 2016 levels.”

So, if there’s one thing the State Department is really, really good at, it is how to track its people overseas. Also there’s absolutely no reason why the State Department could not give FP a clear answer. Unless, of course, the clear answer would indicate that the EFM employment is not/not returning to normal levels.  See, twice a year, the State Department actually releases a report on EFM employment. This happens once in spring, typically in April after the Foreign Service’s winter cycle is done, and again in fall, typically in November, after the summer rotation concludes.

This is the Fall 2017 release. Note that when this report was generated, there were actually more EFMs working outside the mission overseas than inside the mission. This is the first time we’re ever seen this.  Below is the Spring 2017 release (also see Unemployment Status of @StateDept Family Members Overseas (4/2017)). Between April and November 2017, a difference of over a thousand EFM employees. Below is a breakdown of EFM employees by region from 2014-2017. Last year’s 2,373 is the lowest number in four years.  In Fall 2017, there were 11,816 adult family members overseas (this includes State Department, other foreign affairs agencies as well as other USG agencies under chief of mission authority); so 20% EFMs were employed at our overseas posts. In Fall 2016, there were 11,841 adult family members overseas, and 3,501 were employed at our overseas posts or 30 percent. By the way, the overall “not employed” EFM category jumped from 56 percent in April 2017 to 64 percent in November 2017.

The State Department could argue that some more EFMs were hired after the Fall 2017 report. That’s entirely possible. Or if Tillerson’s  additional 2,449 EFM positions” are real numbers, that’s a 96 percent increase to the 2,373 Fall 2017 number.  Really? If FP’s 3,333 number is accurate, it would be 60 less than 3,393 (count released in April 2017); it would also be 168 less than the annual Fall count the previous year at 3,501, and brings the total number closest to the 2015 level.

We’ll have to wait and see, after all, when State announced that it lifted the EFM hiring freeze late last year, it turned out, it was only a 50% lift. So as you can imagine, we have some difficulties digesting this additional number of EFM positions. We’ll have to wait for the Spring 2018 report to see how back to normal this really is. If/When it does return to normal, one still need to shake one’s noggin. This. Was. A useless, needless exercise by thoughtless newbies.

Read more here:

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@StateDept Releases New Strategery For Diplomatic Spouse Professional Employment #Ugh

Posted: 6:01 am ET
Updated: 10:30 am PT (fixed headline)

 

During his town hall with employees on December 12, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson announced the lifting of the hiring freeze in 2018 for Eligible Family Members (EFM). Actually, it turned out to be a 50% lift but State won that news cycle; no one came back to correct that it was not a full lifting of the hiring freeze (see Tillerson Issues New Personnel Actions, But What’s That About Lifting the EFM Hiring Freeze?).

During that speech, Tillerson also announced the expansion of the Expanded Professional Associates Program (EPAP) for Foreign Service spouses (see Tillerson Announces “Immediate Changes” From Redesign, USAID is Now in the GAL – Yay?). He promised:

To take care of our people, we will:

–Diversify and improve the quality of professional opportunities for Eligible Family Members by increasing the number of EPAP positions, from 250 to 400.

–Support EFMs in EPAP positions by offering increased training opportunities for them at the Foreign Service Institute.

 

The Department’s Family Liaison Office also says that “The Department of State is committed to supporting its employees and their families as they balance their service with the needs of family life.”

Recently, the State Department released its new guidance on Preparing for the 2018 Spring/Summer EPAP Vacancy Announcement. Via state.gov/flo:

The Expanded Professional Associates Program (EPAP) provides U.S. citizen Eligible Family Members (EFMs) serving overseas with 200 professional-level Foreign Service full-time positions in Economics, Financial Management, General Services, Human Resources, Management, Office Management, Political, Public Diplomacy, and Registered Nurse areas. The program also provides up to 50 positions in the Information Management area. These positions are centrally funded. Each regional bureau and the Bureau of Information Resource Management (IRM) is authorized a specific number of positions as determined by the Under Secretary for Management. Individual posts may also create post-funded ICASS positions with approval from their regional bureau.

 

New EPAP Qualification Standards

FLO also announced new qualification standards for EPAP applicants:

Previously Qualified EPAP Employees/Applicants Must Must Re-Re-Re-Qualify!

Here’s the howler: everybody starts from scratch. Previously qualified applicants must re-qualify to be eligible under the new standards; they will not be grandfathered into the new program.

Because the qualification standards were revised in 2018, the process of prequalification in one or several EPAP areas has been replaced with the new Qualification Standards. As of January 1, 2018, prior EPAP employees or EPAP prequalified applicants will need to meet the eligibility requirements listed in the new Qualification Standards. To be eligible for each position, applicants must submit an application package with all required documents.
[…]
The application must specifically address both the education and specialized experience requirements listed in the new Qualification Standards. Global Employment Advisors (GEA) can provide tips on preparing a federal resume; email GEI@state.gov.

Refer to the following documents: •    New EPAP Qualification Standards  •    Checklist: How to prepare required documents for the 2018 Spring/Summer Centralized Vacancy Announcement

 

Education Requirements

State/FLO says that EPAP pay grades range from FP-07 to FP-04 as determined by the regional bureaus and IRM. Each advertised position will show the minimum and maximum grades (full performance grade) at which a candidate may be hired.

And yet, the New EPAP Qualification Standards for Financial Management EPAP lists FP-03 as an EPAP grade, with Ph.D. in Business or Public Administration (with a concentration in Accounting or Finance) as an educational requirement, with “none” listed for specialized experience.

Folks, the announcement for a Foreign Service Financial Management Officer (FMO) says that “applicants with finance-related higher education and specific experience in financial management or accounting are preferred” but the education requirement for applicants does not even require a master’s degree, or for that matter, a “Ph.D. in Business or Public Administration with a concentration in Accounting or Finance as an educational requirement”.

Education: Applicants must possess at least a Bachelor’s degree with a minimum of 24 semester hours (36 quarter hours) in accounting or finance earned at the undergraduate or graduate level from an accredited school. Professional certifications such as CPA (certified public accountant) or graduate degrees from an accredited in business, government, or public administration are preferred with concentrations in accounting or finance.

Financial Management Officer

Stitching a Checkered Work Experience to Qualify For Specialized Experience

The Public Diplomacy EPAP with an FP-06 grade requires BA/BS or above in non-related field and 5 years specialized experience in management, oversight and provision of media, marketing, communications, public relations, educational, cultural or journalistic services.

Unless a spouse has that experience already when he/she joined/married into the Foreign Service, it will be a challenge to get that specialized experience after entry.  FS spouses typically take what jobs are available to them at the posts their spouses are assigned to. So they could be working at Public Affairs one tour, at the Consular Section another tour, or as a security escort at yet another post. Which makes it hard to have 5 years specialized experience in specific tracks.

Similarly, Political EPAP requires BA/BS or above in non-related field and 5 years specialized experience in research, monitoring and analysis of political, social, or related conditions and trends, write reports and make recommendations on same. Oh hey, also negotiate policy.

How many folks think this is a new strategery to get to that crucial staffing cuts without a RIF?

Training, Oh, Training – Still on Space A

Selected candidates are encouraged to take related training courses while in Washington, DC during home leave, R&R or personal travel. Financial support for training is not currently available prior to starting a position. However, if a candidate is working and post wishes to fund travel costs and per diem for him/her to take courses at the Foreign Service Institute (FSI) or a regional training center, salary will continue to be paid during the training period from central funds. Individuals selected for this program will generally have priority over other EFMs for language and functional training enrollment on a space available basis. Email FLOASKTraining@state.gov for more information.

Is the State Department serious?

It would review its policy of “space available” training for spouses. And it needs to provide internship opportunities for spouses to obtain specialized experience. We know some spouses who went back to school while in the Service but lack the specialized experience due to their inability to find work while posted overseas.

Send us comments if you care. This is a very late night, um morning now for me, and I need to get to bed. Will probably update this later when I am more awake.

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EEOC Case: Investigators Find False Accusations, Agency Refuses to Help Clear His Name

Posted: 3:01 am ET

 

This is an EEOC case about a complainant who was the Consul General at the U.S. Consulate General in Naples, Italy.  The name used here is a pseudonym as in eeoc practice but the details are similar to the ugly, nasty case a few years back that made the news.  Most notable lesson here about the Privacy Act, and the limits of  Diplomatic Security’s willingness to clear somebody’s name when needed.

Via eeoc.gov

Believing that the Agency subjected him to unlawful discrimination, Complainant filed an equal employment opportunity (EEO) claim with the Agency. On November 26, 2013, Complainant and the Agency entered into a settlement agreement to resolve the matter. This decision on the breached settlement was issued in November 2016. Excerpt below:

Background:

The record reflects that a subordinate of Complainant (Subordinate 1), who resigned in May 2012, and to a lesser extent her spouse made highly charged allegations against Complainant, i.e., entertaining prostitutes, escorts, and married women in his residence during work hours, engaging in fraud or mismanagement of funds, permitting his driver to be fired so his job could go to someone else and as a form of retaliation, throwing metal umbrella pots from his sixth floor residence down to the parking lot below and then jumping on and crushing them, and this was captured on CCTV and in front of the security guards, and so forth. By April 2013, the U.S. Embassy Rome, in consultation with the Bureau of Diplomatic Security, Special Investigation Division initiated an investigation. The investigation was conducted by two Special Agents with the Bureau of Diplomatic Security, and involved 20 individual interviews with Consulate Staff. It concluded that the accusation that Complainant threw metal pots was “false,” and the three other allegations specified above were completely false. The investigation found that the remaining allegations were variously false, completely false, unsubstantiated, not supported by evidence, and one, in essence, grossly exaggerated.

On June 16, 2013, the New York Post and Fox News published highly negative stories about Complainant, writing for example that Subordinate 1, a whistleblower, said Complainant had trysts with hookers, and this was the latest black eye for the scandal-ridden State Department. On June 17, 2013, Complainant was copied on an Agency email chain regarding the New York Post reporting Subordinate 1’s allegation that Complainant insisted a staffer have an abortion and the staffer said she got her “tubes tied” at his instruction. It was indicated in the email chain that the staffer said the article was “all lies” and felt strongly that she should respond to the article by saying something. The above DCM advised that it would be much better for the staffer not to say anything for now – that this could all blow over quickly.

In his EEO claim, according to Complainant, he alleged discrimination when he was denied assignments in line with his experience, ability, and professional background, the DCM knew that allegations against him by Subordinate 1, her spouse and two others were false and failed to take appropriate action, and management held him accountable for the false accusations and denied him support.

By letters to the Agency dated February 1, 2016 and May 10, 2016, Complainant alleged that the Agency misled him into entering into the settlement agreement and breached it. Specifically, he alleged that when he signed the settlement agreement, the Agency knew Subordinate 1’s EEO complaint had been investigated with a finding of no wrongdoing on his part, that she would likely continue to litigate in federal court, and he could have used the EEO decision to exonerate himself. Complainant wrote that after the settlement agreement, Subordinate 1 continued to attack him in the press, with articles appearing in prominent news outlets such as Newsweek and the New York Post. He pointed to a proposed June 2013 Agency press release recounting that the Diplomatic Security Service investigated the allegations and found no violations of U.S. or Italian law, and contended that had the press release been issued this would have rebutted the articles or they would not have been published. He argues that the Agency allowed employees and family members to utilize the EEO process to raise false allegations against him despite the Agency’s conclusion that they were baseless, and in failing to clear his name breached the settlement agreement and made it ineffective and unenforceable.

The Agency found that it complied with the settlement agreement. Regarding term 9.d, the Agency found that Complainant’s submittal of proposed changes to his 2012 EER was a condition precedent to the former DCM reviewing them and considering making changes, and Complainant admitted he did not submit proposed changes because he was too disheartened and depressed. On appeal, Complainant, who is represented by counsel, confirms this, but adds another reason was that he lacked the necessary facts, particularly the EEO decision on Subordinate 1’s complaint.

Regarding term 9.g, the Agency recounted that Complainant stated it was breached because (1) the Agency simply wrote a one page memorandum simply listing the allegations against him and stating they were found to be unsubstantiated rather than discussing things in context to show how his accusers seized on scandal to defame him and hinder his career, (2) the memorandum was only based on facts until October 2013, failing to fulfill its purpose of summarizing the Diplomatic Security investigation,3 and (3) the Agency, in response to his inquiries, could not give him a clear answer on whether he could share the memorandum with family, colleagues, friends, and his Italian attorney, preventing him from doing so. On appeal, Complainant confirms that he raised reasons (1) and (3). He argues that not being able to share the memorandum makes it useless and his reason for entering into settlement negotiations was to restore his reputation.

In determining that it complied with term 9.g, the Agency found that it met its obligation to provide a summary of the investigation, and that there is no evidence the parties agreed to any specific format in or upon the use of the memorandum.

In determining that it did not negotiate the settlement agreement in bad faith, the Agency found that Complainant cited no authority for the proposition that it was obligated to divulge the outcome of Subordinate 1’s EEO case, and there was no evidence it negotiated in bad faith.

On appeal, Complainant adds that he would not have bargained for a memorandum summarizing the results of the Bureau of Diplomatic Security’s investigation had he known he could not use it, this is common sense, and the Agency’s failure to authorize its use is a breach of the settlement agreement. Complainant argues that the Agency breached the settlement agreement by failing to live up to the spirit of the document. He argues that the Agency’s failure, upon his request, to allow the issuance of the proposed press release in the Agency’s name violates the settlement agreement.

In opposition to the appeal, the Agency argues that disclosing Subordinate 1’s employment discrimination investigation would violate privacy right protected information, and it did not negotiate the settlement agreement in bad faith.

Decision

In June 2013, after the New York Post reported highly charged accusations by Subordinate 1 about the way Complainant treated a staffer, an Agency email string on which Complainant was copied showed the staffer wanted to say something rebutting what was reported, but the former DCM opined it would be much better if the staffer did not say anything now – this could blow over quickly. Further, Complainant strongly suggests that he was aware the Bureau of Diplomatic Security investigation was favorable and he certainly knew the Agency had done nothing to publically clear his name. While Complainant wanted the Agency to publically clear his name, he agreed to a settlement agreement that did not have a term explicitly doing this. Instead, the Agency agreed to issue to a summary of the Bureau of Diplomatic Security to Complainant – not the public.

Complainant’s contention that the Agency bargained for the settlement agreement in bad faith is not persuasive. First, as argued by the Agency, it had reason to believe the administrative decision on Subordinate 1’s complaint was protected by the Privacy Act, since administrative EEO records are generally within the scope of the Act. Further, Complainant has not shown he did not already have sufficient information to make a fair bargain when negotiating the settlement agreement.

The FAD is AFFIRMED.

Read the full case here via eeoc.gov.

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Tillerson Issues New Personnel Actions, But What’s That About Lifting the EFM Hiring Freeze?

Posted: 1:33 am ET

 

On Monday, December 18, the State Department reportedly announced that Secretary Tillerson approved a number of additional personnel actions as follows:

#1. An A-100 class with a start date of March 19, 2018

#2. A Specialist Class  with a start date of April 2, 2018

#3. Resumption of Civill Service lateral movement within the Department  beginning January 7, 2018

#4. Resumption of internal Civil Service competitive promotions beginning January 7, 2018

#5. Approval of 30 new Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) hires from the 2016/2017 PMF cohorts

#6. Approval of an additional 20 PMF hires from the 2018 cohort

#7. Conversion of 20 pathways interns to full-time Civil Service permanent positions

In related news, on December 12, Tillerson announced several immediate changes attributed to the redesign at the State Department (see Tillerson Announces “Immediate Changes” From Redesign, USAID is Now in the GAL – Yay?).  The number one item on the list of “wins” was the “Expanded Opportunities for Eligible Family Members” and the announcement that the State Department was “lifting the hiring freeze for 2018 EFMs and providing the bureaus with greater placement flexibility.”

We have since learned from two sources that “lifting” the hiring freeze actually means a 50% lift. We understand that Bureaus will be allowed to fill 50% of their EFM jobs, and they will have the authority to make those decisions themselves, instead of those requests going all the way up the godpod.

Also it turns out USAID is also already in the GAL (the last item on Tillerson’s list of immediate changes)? What’s that?  Tillerson’s inner circle celebrating the town hall should not do a happy dance? And no cookies either?

But seriously — what process did the redesign teams go through that resulted in this decision to lift, excuse me, lift the hiring freeze for 50% of 2018 EFMs?

What kind of study are they conducting regarding the rest of the EFM jobs?

What was the decision process for imposing this freeze in the first place, we’d really like to know.

Because unless Tillerson is planning on some post closures, these EFM jobs are needed at our overseas posts whether there’s a redesign or not, whether it’s now or later. The work will still be there: community liaison, mailroom clerk, security escort, security office assistant, general service assistant, etc. Are they going to come back after the “redesign” is completed and say go ahead, you may now hire the other 50% because we’ve figured out posts need them afterall? Or are they going to lift the other 50% the next time Tillerson gets into a dire press patch, and needs another “win”.

So you know, it’s good that 50% of diplomatic spouses waiting for jobs overseas will now be able to fill some jobs but this still doesn’t make sense. To us, this still feels capricious.

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