Snapshot: Foreign Service National (FSN) Emergency Relief Fund

 

The Foreign Service National Emergency Relief Fund was created to respond to crises following natural disasters, civil unrest, and targeted attacks or “in the line of duty” incidents affecting locally employed (LE) staff working for the U.S. Government. It is one of almost 90 Gift Fund programs managed by the Office of Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service (M/EDCS) and is one of the two Gift Fund programs that exist solely to assist employees. Funding for this program is not appropriated and is sustained solely by private contributions. The donations are tax deductible and 100% of all contributions are allocated for disbursement directly to Locally Employed (LE) Staff. Contributions to the Fund can be made by Civil Service, Foreign Service, LE Staff and private sector individuals (via RNET).
Donations can be made via the following:
• Secure on-line electronic donations can be made directly from your bank account or by credit/debit card to http://www.pay.gov.
• Checks may be sent to the Department’s Gift Fund Coordinator’s Office M/EDCS, Rm. 7427-B, 2201 C Street NW, Washington DC 20520. Please make checks payable to the U.S. Department of State, designation for the “FSN Emergency Relief Fund”.
• DOS, LE Staff, and overseas American employees of other federal agencies currently being paid by State can make contributions by payroll deduction. One time or recurring payroll deductions can be made through the Payroll Customer Support Center at PayHelp@state.gov.  LE staff wishing to contribute should contact their management office for currency exchange assistance.  CGFS/EDCS has authorized reverse accommodation exchange for emergency fund contributions.  For additional information, please visit the CGFS/EDCS website.
Read more: 2 FAM 962.14  Gifts to the Foreign Service National Emergency Relief Fund

 

 

Snapshot: PP9645 and PP9983 – Affected Nationalities, Nonimmigrant and Immigrant Visas

 

On January 20, 2021, President Biden signed a Presidential Proclamation (P.P. 10141) titled “Ending Discriminatory Bans on Entry to the United States.”  This proclamation ended the travel restrictions under Presidential Proclamations 9645 and 9983 under Trump and directed the State Department to pursue the processing of visa applications for individuals from affected countries consistent with applicable law and visa processing procedures.  Guidance on State’s implementation of P.P. 10141 can be found here. Pursuant to President Biden’s Proclamation, the visa restrictions under Proclamations 9645 and 9983 are no longer applicable.
Below is a CA report on the affected nationalities for both nonimmigrant and immigrant visas from December 8, 2017 t0 January 20, 2021. The full report is available here.

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Snapshot: Staffing at US Embassy Moscow v. Russian Embassy USA

 

 

Snapshot: Afghanistan Special Immigrant Visas (SIVs) Issued FY2000-FY2020

 

 

Fiscal Year Visa Statistics
Oct 1-Sept 30

SIVs Issued to Afghanistan

Administration

DPB/Operations Allies Refuge

2,000
(Note: No public data on how many of evacuees are SIVs)

Biden

SIVs FY2021

Jan 20/2021-Sept 30/2021
Oct 1/2020-Jan 20/2021

(Note: Total SIVs will not be available until after 9/30/21)

Biden
Trump

SIVs FY2020
Oct 1-Sept 30

7,878

Trump

SIVs FY2019
Oct 1-Sept 30

9,805

Trump

SIVs FY2018
Oct 1-Sept 30

7,431

Trump

SIVs FY2017

Jan 20/2017-Sept 30/2017
Oct 1/2016-Jan 20/2017

16,370

Trump
Obama

SIVs FY2016
Oct 1-Sept 30

12,298

Obama

SIVs FY2015
Oct 1-Sept 30

6,884

Obama

SIVs FY2014
Oct 1-Sept 30

9,283

Obama

SIVs FY2013
Oct 1-Sept 30

1,597

Obama

SIVs FY2012
Oct 1-Sept 30

237

Obama

SIVs FY2011
Oct 1-Sept 30

121

Obama

SIVs FY2010
Oct 1-Sept 30

111

Obama

SIVs FY2009

Jan 20/2009-Sept 30/2009
Oct 1/2008-Jan 20/2009

680

Obama

Bush GW

SIVs FY2008

Oct 1-Sept 30

817

Bush GW

SIVs FY2007

Oct 1-Sept 30

161

Bush GW

SIVs FY2006

Oct 1-Sept 30

1

Bush GW

SIVs FY2005

Oct 1-Sept 30

1

Bush GW

SIVs FY2004

Oct 1-Sept 30

4

Bush GW

SIVs FY2003

Oct 1-Sept 30

2

Bush GW

SIVs FY2002

Oct 1-Sept 30

0

Bush GW

SIVs FY2001

Jan 20/2001-Sept 30/2001
Oct 1/2000-Jan 20/2001

5

Bush GW
Clinton

SIVs FY2000

Oct 1-Sept 30

3

Clinton

TOTAL SIVs ISSUED

73,689

Compiled by @diplopundit

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Snapshot: Number of Afghan SIVs Allocated by Fiscal Year and Authorizing Legislation

 

Related:

 

 

26,500: Total Number of Principal Afghan SIVs For Issuance After 12/19/2014 Per FY2020 NDAA

 

 

The State Department’s Press Briefing of August 16 is all about Afghanistan. Excerpt below on SIVs:

We have spoken to our effort on behalf of SIVs, so-called Special Immigrant Visa applicants. You ask why we didn’t – why we haven’t done more. Let me just offer a bit of context. Through the course of this program, the United States has resettled, brought to their new lives, more than 75,000 Afghans who have in various ways assisted the United States Government over the years. The Special Immigrant Visa program provides – well, as it was initially conceived and legislated by Congress, it provides a visa to the United States. When this administration recognized that the security situation was becoming – was quickly evolving, many weeks ago we launched Operation Allies Refuge. This was something that was never envisioned in any SIV program, including the one we had in Afghanistan or the one we had in Iraq; that is to say, a gargantuan U.S. effort not only to process, adjudicate, and to grant visas to these so-called special immigrants but to actually bring them to the United States with a massive airlift operation.

It’s been through that operation that 2,000 Afghans have been able to reach the United States. Most of those Afghans have now been able to start their new lives through resettlement agencies. Just – it was a month or so ago we recognized that the need could be even greater for Afghans who are vulnerable, who may be at risk. That is precisely why we initiated a so-called Priority 2, P-2 refugee status program that went beyond – beyond the statutory definitions of who could apply for and be eligible for the SIV program, to include those brave Afghans who not only have helped the U.S. Government over the years but have helped the American people.

We know that there are other vulnerable Afghans – some for the work they have done, some for the things they have said, some for nothing more than their gender – and we are also working and planning to bring as many as we can to safety.

Right now, we are, again, in the process of re-establishing control over the airport. The military has been able to surge resources and will surge additional resources to the theater to allow us to bring, on a large scale, a number of these Afghans who will be able to start new lives in the United States or who will be able to reach safety elsewhere in the world. We are committed to that. We have been flexible. We have been ambitious in our effort to do just that.

Note that FY2020 National Defense Authorization Act  (NDAA) amended the SIV program for Afghanistan and put a limit to the total number of principal Afghan applicants who could be granted a special immigrant visas after December 19, 2012 originally at 22,500. The Congressional Research Service indicates that the State Department has taken the position that the total number of SIVs available after December 19, 2014 is actually 26,500. That number matched the data provided by State to State/OIG when it reviewed the Afghan SIV program in 2020.
CRS also says that the FY2021 CAA, enacted on December 27, 2020, “rewrote the existing statutory visa cap language (which provided 22,500 visas) to authorize a new total of 26,500, an increase of 4,000 visas.”
According to the US Embassy Kabul Consular Section cited by State/OIG, it is common for an SIV applicant to have approximately five derivative family members (one spouse and four children) who qualify to receive SIVs.  If State has already issued 75,000 SIVs, approximately 15,000 principal applicants were already issued visas. Which means, there are 11,000 visas for principal applicants still available;  after that, Congress will need to fix the cap if it wants additional visas to be issued.

Sources: State/OIG/Review of the Afghan SIV 2020 and CRS Report June 21, 2021

 

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