Senate Confirmations: Bitter, Kim, Young, Symington, Donovan

Posted: 1:38 am ET

 

The U.S. Senate confirmed the following ambassador nominations on Wednesday, September 28. Five nominations included in SFRC’s business meeting on September 27 did not make it to the full Senate vote (see bottom list).  About 17 other ambassador nominations and FS lists are currently pending in committee and do not have scheduled hearings as of this writing.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Executive Calendar #728
Rena Bitter – to be Ambassador of the United States of America to the Lao People’s Democratic Republic

Executive Calendar #729
Sung Y. Kim – to be Ambassador of the United States of America to the Republic of the Philippines

Executive Calendar #730
Andrew Robert Young – to be Ambassador of the United States of America to Burkina Faso

Executive Calendar #731
W. Stuart Symington – to be Ambassador of the United States of America to the Federal Republic of Nigeria

Executive Calendar #732
Joseph R. Donovan Jr. – to be Ambassador of the United States of America to the Republic of Indonesia

 

UNITED NATIONS

Executive Calendar #733
Christopher Coons – to be Representative of the United States of America to the Seventy-first Session of the General Assembly of the United Nations

Executive Calendar #734
Ronald H. Johnson – to be Representative of the United States of America to the Seventy-first Session of the General Assembly of the United Nations

 

Waiting for full Senate vote:

The following nomination and FS lists were in the agenda of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee but appear not to make it through the full Senate vote. Note that the hyperlinked lists are those posted in the Senate’s Executive Calendar.

Ms. Kamala Shirin Lakhdhir, of Connecticut, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to Malaysia

Jorge A. Abudei, et al., dated September 6, 2016 (PN 1704), as amended — (PN1704-2)

John Robert Adams, et al., dated September 6, 2016 (PN 1705) – (PN1705)

Jennisa Paredes, et al., dated July 13, 2016 (PN 1643), as amended — (PN1643-2)

Diana Isabel Acosta, et al., dated July 13, 2016 (PN 1642), as amended — (PN1642-2)

 

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Senate Confirms Peter M. McKinley to be U.S.Ambassador to Brazil, More Noms Pending in Committee

Posted: 3:31 pm ET

The following are nominations currently waiting for their committee hearings or waiting on the executive calendar for a full Senate vote. As of today, the SFRC does not have nominations scheduled for hearings.

Pending on the Executive Calendar:

DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Amos J. Hochstein, of the District of Columbia, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (Energy Resources), vice John Stern Wolf.

UNITED STATES ADVISORY COMMISSION ON PUBLIC DIPLOMACY

Douglas Barry Wilson, of Delaware, to be a Member of the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy for a term expiring July 1, 2017, vice Elizabeth F. Bagley, term expired.

OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION

Nelson Reyneri, of Washington, to be a Member of the Board of Directors of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation for a term expiring December 17, 2018, vice Matthew Maxwell Taylor Kennedy, term expired.

Roberto R. Herencia, of Illinois, to be a Member of the Board of Directors of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation for a term expiring December 17, 2018. (Reappointment)

EUROPEAN BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT

Catherine Ann Novelli, of Virginia, to be United States Alternate Governor of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vice Robert D. Hormats, resigned.

 

Pending in the Senate Foreign Relations Committee:

Ambassadors and Senior Officials:

2016-07-13 PN1624 Department of State | Joseph R. Donovan Jr., of Virginia, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of Indonesia.

2016-06-29 PN1588 Department of State | W. Stuart Symington, of Missouri, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

2016-06-16 PN1547 Department of State | Andrew Robert Young, of California, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to Burkina Faso.

2016-06-16 PN1546 Department of State | Kamala Shirin Lakhdhir, of Connecticut, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to Malaysia.

2016-05-19 PN1490 Department of State | Sung Y. Kim, of California, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of the Philippines.

2016-05-19 PN1488 Department of State | Rena Bitter, of Texas, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Lao People’s Democratic Republic.

2015-07-08 PN628 Department of State | Mari Carmen Aponte, of the District of Columbia, to be Permanent Representative of the United States of America to the Organization of American States, with the rank of Ambassador.

2015-01-08 PN48 Department of State | Jennifer Ann Haverkamp, of Indiana, to be Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs.

2015-02-26 PN229 African Development Bank | Marcia Denise Occomy, of the District of Columbia, to be United States Director of the African Development Bank for a term of five years.

2015-02-26 PN228 Inter-American Development Bank | Mileydi Guilarte, of the District of Columbia, to be United States Alternate Executive Director of the Inter-American Development Bank.

Foreign Service Nominations

2016-09-06 PN1705 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning John Robert Adams, and ending David M. Zwick, which 161 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on September 6, 2016.

2016-09-06 PN1704 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning Jorge A. Abudei, and ending Deborah Kay Jones, which 100 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on September 6, 2016.

2016-07-13 PN1643 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning Jennisa Paredes, and ending Jamoral Twine, which 5 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on July 13, 2016.

2016-07-13 PN1642 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning Diana Isabel Acosta, and ending Elisa Joelle Zogbi, which 192 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on July 13, 2016.

2015-06-10 PN573-6 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning Jeffries Blunt de Graffenried, Jr., and ending Debbie Patrice Jackson, which 2 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on June 10, 2015.

2015-02-26 PN230-3 Foreign Service | Nomination for David Elliott Horton III, which nomination was received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on February 26, 2015.

2015-01-13 PN72-8 Foreign Service | Nomination for Daniel Menco Hirsch, which nomination was received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on January 13, 2015.

2015-01-13 PN71-2 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning David J. Barth, and ending R. Douglass Arbuckle, which 2 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on January 13, 2015.

 

 

 

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List of Presidential Appointee Positions at @StateDept Requiring Senate Confirmation

Posted: 12:05 am ET

 

Via CRS, August 23, 2016

The following list of State Department positions is extracted from CRS Report RL30959 which indicates that the information provided in the report was compiled from the Senate nominations database of the Legislative Information System which spans the 97th Congress (1981-1982) to the present; data on departmental and agency websites; telephone conversations with agency officials; and the United States Code. Note the two (2)) positions at State and one (1) at USAID that no longer require Senate confirmations due to the Presidential Appointment Efficiency and Streamlining Act of 2011.

Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Full-Time Positions

Department of State 109
Secretary
Deputy Secretary
Deputy Secretary—Management and Resources
Under Secretary—Arms Control and International Security
Under Secretary—Economic, Energy and Agricultural Affairs
Under Secretary—Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights
Under Secretary—Management
Under Secretary—Political Affairs
Under Secretary—Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs
Assistant Secretary—African Affairs 110
Assistant Secretary—Arms Control, Verification and Compliance
Assistant Secretary—Budget and Planning/*Chief Financial Officer 111
Assistant Secretary—Conflict and Stabilization Operations
Assistant Secretary—Consular Affairs
Assistant Secretary—Democracy, Human Rights and Labor
Assistant Secretary—Diplomatic Security/Director—Office of Foreign Missions112
Assistant Secretary—East Asian and Pacific Affairs
Assistant Secretary—Economic, Energy and Business Affairs
Assistant Secretary—Educational and Cultural Affairs
Assistant Secretary—European and Eurasian Affairs
Assistant Secretary—International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
Assistant Secretary—International Organization Affairs
Assistant Secretary—International Security and Nonproliferation
*Assistant Secretary—Legislative Affairs
Assistant Secretary—Near Eastern Affairs
Assistant Secretary—Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific
Affairs Assistant Secretary—Political-Military Affairs
Assistant Secretary—Population, Refugees and Migration
Assistant Secretary—South and Central Asian Affairs
Assistant Secretary—Western Hemisphere Affairs
Ambassador-at-Large—Coordinator—Counterterrorism
Ambassador-at-Large—Global Women’s Issues
Ambassador-at-Large—Director—Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons
Ambassador-at-Large—International Religious Freedom
Ambassador-at-Large—War Crimes Issues
U.S. Permanent Representative to the Organization of American States
U.S. Permanent Representative to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization
Coordinator—Reconstruction and Stabilization
Coordinator—U.S. Global AIDS
Director General—Foreign Service
*Chief Financial Officer113
Inspector General 114
Legal Adviser
Chief of Protocol 115

Ambassadors

Foreign Service Officers (numerous commissions and promotions)

U.S. Mission to the United Nations

U.S. Permanent Representative and Chief of Mission—United Nations
U.S. Deputy Permanent Representative—United Nations
U.S. Representative—United Nations Economic and Social Council
U.S. Alternate Representative—Special Political Affairs in the United Nations
U.S. Representative—United Nations Management and Reform
U.S. Representative—European Office of the United Nations (Geneva)
U.S. Representative—Vienna Office of the United Nations (also serves as a representative to the International Atomic Energy Agency)
U.S. Representative—International Atomic Energy Agency
U.S. Deputy Representative—International Atomic Energy Agency
U.S. Representative and Alternate Representatives to sessions of the General Assembly and other United Nations Bodies—numerous positions (terms of office depends on length of session)

U.S. Agency for International Development 116

Administrator
Deputy Administrator
Assistant Administrator—Sub-Saharan Africa
Assistant Administrator—Asia
Assistant Administrator—Europe and Eurasia
Assistant Administrator—Food Safety Assistant
Administrator—Global Health
Assistant Administrator—Democracy, Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance
Assistant Administrator—Latin America and Caribbean
Assistant Administrator—Middle East
*Assistant Administrator—Legislative and Public Affairs
Assistant Administrator—Policy, Planning and Learning
Assistant Administrator—Economic Growth, Agriculture, and Trade
Inspector General117

European Bank for Reconstruction and Development
U.S. Executive Director

International Broadcasting Bureau, Broadcasting Board of Governors
Director

International Joint Commission, United States and Canada
Commissioner—three positions

International Monetary Fund
U.S. Executive Director (two-year term of office)
U.S. Alternate Executive Director (two-year term of office)

Inter-American Development Bank
U.S. Executive Director (three-year term of office—The incumbent of this position also serves as U.S. Executive Director for the Inter-American Investment Corporation.)

U.S. Alternate Executive Director (three-year term of office—The incumbent of this position also serves as U.S. Alternate Executive Director for the Inter-American Investment Corporation.)

U.S. Trade and Development Agency
Director

Organizations with Full- and Part-Time Positions 118

African Development Bank
U.S. Executive Director (five-year term of office; full-time)
Governor and Alternate Governor (five-year terms of office; part-time)

Asian Development Bank
U.S. Executive Director (full-time)
Governor and Alternate Governor (part-time)

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development
U.S. Executive Director (two-year term of office; full-time—The incumbent also serves as U.S.
Executive Director for the International Finance Corporation and the International Development Association.)

U.S. Alternate Executive Director (two-year term of office; full-time—The incumbent also serves as U.S. Alternate Executive Director for the International Finance Corporation and the International Development Association.)

Governor (same individual as the International Monetary Fund Governor; five-year term of office; part-time—The incumbent also serves as Governor for the International Finance Corporation and the International Development Association.)

Alternate Governor (five-year term of office; part-time—The incumbent also serves as Alternate Governor for the International Finance Corporation and the International Development Association.)

Millennium Challenge Corporation

Chief Executive Officer (full-time)
*Member, Board of Directors—four (of nine total) positions (part-time; three-year terms of office)

Overseas Private Investment Corporation

President/Chief Executive Officer (full-time)
Executive Vice President (full-time)
*Member, Board of Directors—8 (of 15 total) positions (part-time; three-year terms of office)

Peace Corps

Director (full-time)
Deputy Director (full-time)
*Member, National Peace Corps Advisory Council—15 positions (part-time; political balance required; two-year terms of office)

Part-Time Positions

Advisory Board for Cuba Broadcasting (political balance required)119
*Member—eight positions (three-year terms of office)

African Development Foundation, Board of Directors (political balance required)
*Member—seven positions (six-year terms of office)120

African Development Fund
Governor and Alternate Governor

Broadcasting Board of Governors (political balance required)
Member—eight (of nine total) positions (three-year terms of office)

Inter-American Foundation, Board of Directors (political balance required)
*Member—nine positions (six-year terms of office)

U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy (political balance required)
*Commissioner—seven positions (three-year terms of office)

Presidential Appointee Positions That No Longer Required Senate Confirmation Per P.L. 112-166, the Presidential Appointment Efficiency and Streamlining Act of 2011

Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs, Department of State

Assistant Secretary for Administration, Department of State

Assistant Administrator for Management, U.S. Agency for International Development

 

Notes:

109 For other positions within the department, see also Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs (for inspector general position), and Select Committee on Intelligence.

110 Although not guaranteed, most recent Assistant Secretaries—African Affairs also held the advice and consent part- time position as a member of the Board of Directors of the African Development Foundation.

111 The chief financial officer (CFO) may be appointed by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate, or may be designated by the President from among agency officials who have been confirmed by the Senate for other positions (31 U.S.C. §901(a)(1)).

* Nomination covered by S.Res. 116 with privileged status under a standing order of the Senate. See “Standing Order on ‘Privileged’ Nominations” for further explanation.

112 Nomination must be made and confirmed for both positions.

113 This chief financial officer (CFO) is one of the CFO positions covered by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-576), as amended, that may be filled through appointment by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate, or through designation by the President from among agency officials who have been confirmed by the Senate for other positions (31 U.S.C. §901(a)(1)).

114 Pursuant to a UC agreement, most IG nominations are referred sequentially to the committee with predominant jurisdiction over the particular IG’s agency and then the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. For more information, see footnote 6.

115 According to the State Department, “Since 1961, the Chief of Protocol has been commissioned an Ambassador, requiring the President’s nominee to be confirmed by the Senate.” Quote from the State Department website, available at http://www.state.gov/s/cpr/c15634.htm.

* Nomination covered by S.Res. 116 with privileged status under a standing order of the Senate. See “Standing Order on “Privileged” Nominations” for further explanation.

116 See also Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs (for inspector general position).

117 Pursuant to a UC agreement, most IG nominations are referred sequentially to the committee with predominant jurisdiction over the particular IG’s agency and then the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. For more information, see footnote 6.

* Nomination covered by S.Res. 116 with privileged status under a standing order of the Senate. See “Standing Order on “Privileged” Nominations” for further explanation.

118 Because several organizations under this committee have both full- and part-time advice and consent positions, they were listed under this heading for succinctness.

* Nomination covered by S.Res. 116 with privileged status under a standing order of the Senate. See “Standing Order on “Privileged” Nominations” for further explanation.

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Top Diplomats Oppose Lateral Entry Program to the MidLevels in the Foreign Service

Posted: 1:28 am ET

Last month,  the American Academy of Diplomacy (AAD) sent a letter to SFRC Chairman Bob Corker (R-Tenn) to register its strong opposition to the provision in the draft FY 2017 State Department Authorization Bill (Section 207) mandating a program for lateral entry into the Foreign Service at the middle and higher ranks. Below is an excerpt:

— The provision will damage American security interests by undermining the professional nature of the U.S. Foreign Service. Professionalism is as necessary for diplomacy as for the military.

— The provision will subject the Foreign Service to unprecedented politicization to the detriment of our nation’s security.

— At a time when we ask Foreign Services Officers to risk life and limb in assignments from Afghanistan to Africa, the provision would allow entry into the Service at ranks equivalent to Major, Lt. Colonel and Colonel without earning that distinction by actual service and without accumulating the experience to support their status.
[….]
The Academy’s mission is to promote a strong American diplomacy, which today is needed more than ever to support and protect America’s interests. Our most recent report, American Diplomacy at Risk, called for an effective American diplomacy based on a strong State Department founded on strong Foreign and Civil Services. We called for robust funding of diplomacy and we highlighted the need to enhance a professional Foreign Service, not diminish it as this proposed provision will do. The need for a professional Service has been affirmed repeatedly in legislation for nearly 100 years. It will be even more needed in the global world of tomorrow.

The letter signed by AAD Chairman Thomas Pickering, Vice Chairman Marc Grossman, and President Ronald Neumann, was also sent to Senators Cardin and McCain and Representatives Engel and Royce.

The Academy of American Diplomacy founded in 1983 is a non-profit organization whose active membership is limited to men and women who have held positions of high responsibility in crafting and implementing American foreign policy. Last year, it issued the report, American Diplomacy at Risk available to read here (PDF).

Read the letter in full below:

 

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S.1635: Title VI – Management and Accountability (FY2016)

Posted: 5:50 pm PT
Updated: May 3, 10:14 pm PT

S.1635 Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016 passed the Senate by unanimous consent on April 28, 2016. (See Whoa! Senate Passes @StateDept Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, FY2016).  Below is Part 6 of 6 extracted from thomas.gov congress.gov for easier reading (oh, joy, the links timeout!). See below on what’s included but read the bill via congressional record in PDF or as TEXT here as alternative sources.


Sec. 601. Short title.

Sec. 602. Competitive hiring status for former employees of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction.

Sec. 603. Assurance of independence of IT systems.

Sec. 604. Protecting the integrity of internal investigations.

Sec. 605. Report on Inspector General inspection and auditing of Foreign Service posts and bureaus and operating units Department of State.

 

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Related sections:

Part 1: S.1635: Title I – @StateDept Authorities and Activities (FY2016)
Part 2: S.1635: TITLE II–Organization and Personnel of the Department of State (FY2016)
Part 3: S.1635: TITLE III – International Organizations (FY2016)
Part 4: S.1635: Title IV – Consular Authorities (FY2016)
Part 5: S.1635: Title V – Embassy Security (FY2016)

Related posts:

 

S.1635: Title V – Embassy Security (FY2016)

Posted: 5:47 pm PT
Updated: May 3, 10:12 pm PT

S.1635 Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016 passed the Senate by unanimous consent on April 28, 2016. (See Whoa! Senate Passes @StateDept Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, FY2016). Below is Part 5 of 6 extracted from thomas.gov congress.gov for easier reading (oh, joy, the links timeout!). See below on what’s included but read the bill via congressional record in PDF or as TEXT here as alternative sources.


Sec. 501. Worldwide security protection.

Sec. 502. Embassy security, construction and maintenance.


Sec. 511. Local guard contracts abroad under diplomatic security program.

Sec. 512. Disciplinary action resulting from unsatisfactory leadership in relation to a security incident.

Sec. 513. Management and staff accountability.

Sec. 514. Security enhancements for soft targets.


Sec. 521. Additional reports on expansion and enhancement of Marine Corps Security Guard Program.


Sec. 531. Designation and reporting for high threat, high risk posts.

Sec. 532. Designation and reporting for high-risk counterintelligence threat posts.

Sec. 533. Enhanced qualifications for Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for high threat, high risk posts.

Sec. 534. Security environment threat list briefings.

Sec. 535. Comptroller General of the United States report on implementation of Benghazi Accountability Review Board recommendations.

Sec. 536. Foreign Affairs Security Training Center.

Sec. 537. Language training.


Sec. 541. Provision of copies of accountability review board reports to Congress.

Sec. 542. Staffing.

 

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Related sections:

Part 1: S.1635: Title I – @StateDept Authorities and Activities (FY2016)
Part 2: S.1635: TITLE II–Organization and Personnel of the Department of State (FY2016)
Part 3: S.1635: TITLE III – International Organizations (FY2016)
Part IV: S.1635: Title IV – Consular Authorities (FY2016)

Related posts:

S.1635: Title IV – Consular Authorities (FY2016)

Posted: 5:41 pm PT
Updated: May 3, 10:07 pm PT

S.1635 Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016 passed the Senate by unanimous consent on April 28, 2016. (See Whoa! Senate Passes @StateDept Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, FY2016).  Below is Part 4 of 6 extracted from thomas.gov congress.gov for easier reading (oh, joy, the links timeout!). See below on what’s included but read the bill via congressional record in PDF or as TEXT here as alternative sources.


Sec. 401. Visa ineligibility for international child abductors.

Sec. 402. Presumption of immigrant intent for H and L visa classifications.

Sec. 403. Visa information sharing.

 

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Related sections:

Part 1: S.1635: Title I – @StateDept Authorities and Activities (FY2016)
Part 2: S.1635: TITLE II–Organization and Personnel of the Department of State (FY2016)
Part 3: S.1635: TITLE III – International Organizations (FY2016)

Related posts:

S.1635: TITLE III – International Organizations (FY2016)

Posted: 5:37 pm PT
Updated: May 3, 9:57 pm PT

S.1635 Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016 passed the Senate by unanimous consent on April 28, 2016. (See Whoa! Senate Passes @StateDept Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, FY2016).  Below is Part 3 of 6 extracted from thomas.gov for easier reading (oh, joy, the links timeout!). See below on what’s included but read the bill via congressional record in PDF or as TEXT here as alternative sources.


Sec. 301. Reports concerning the United Nations.

Sec. 302. Annual report on financial contributions to international organizations.

Sec. 303. Report on peacekeeping arrears, credits, and contributions.

Sec. 304. Assessment rate transparency.


Sec. 311. Preventing abuse in peacekeeping.

Sec. 312. Inclusion of peacekeeping abuses in country report on human rights practices.

Sec. 313. Evaluation of United Nations peacekeeping missions.


Sec. 321. Encouraging employment of United States citizens at the United Nations.

Sec. 322. Ensuring appropriate United Nations personnel salaries.

 

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Related sections:

Part 1: S.1635: Title I – @StateDept Authorities and Activities (FY2016)
Part 2: S.1635: TITLE II–Organization and Personnel of the Department of State (FY2016)

 

Related posts:

 

 

S.1635: TITLE II–Organization and Personnel of the Department of State (FY2016)

Posted: 5:31 pm PT
Updated: May 3, 9:57 pm PT

S.1635 Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016 passed the Senate by unanimous consent on April 28, 2016. (See Whoa! Senate Passes @StateDept Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, FY2016).  Below is Part 2 of 6 extracted from thomas.gov for easier reading (oh, joy, the links timeout!). See below on what’s included but read the bill via congressional record in PDF or as TEXT here as alternative sources.

 


Sec. 201. Rightsizing accountability.

Sec. 202. Integration of foreign economic policy.

Sec. 203. Review of Bureau of African Affairs and Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs jurisdictions.

Sec. 204. Special envoys, representatives, advisors, and coordinators.

Sec. 205. Conflict prevention, mitigation and resolution, and the inclusion and participation of women.

Sec. 206. Information technology system security.

Sec. 207. Analysis of embassy cost sharing.

Sec. 208. Parent advisory committee to the Interagency Working Group to Prevent International Parental Child Abduction.

Sec. 209. Improving research and evaluation of public diplomacy.

Sec. 210. Enhanced institutional capacity of the Bureau of African Affairs.


Sec. 211. Review of Foreign Service Officer compensation.

Sec. 212. Repeal of recertification requirement for senior Foreign Service.

Sec. 213. Compensatory time off for travel.

Sec. 214. Certificates of demonstrated competence.

Sec. 215. Foreign Service assignment restrictions.

Sec. 216. Security clearance suspensions.

Sec. 217. Economic statecraft education and training.

Sec. 218. Report on diversity recruitment, employment, retention, and promotion.

Sec. 219. Expansion of the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program, the Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program, and the Donald M. Payne International Development Fellowship Program.

Sec. 220. Retention of mid- and senior-level professionals from underrepresented groups.

Sec. 221. Review of jurisdictional responsibilities of the Special Representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan and the Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs.

Sec. 222. Congressional notification of countries compliance with minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking.

Sec. 223. International religious freedom training program.
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Related sections:

Part 1: S.1635: Title I – @StateDept Authorities and Activities (FY2016)

 

Related posts:

 

 

 

S.1635: Title I – @StateDept Authorities and Activities (FY2016)

Posted: 5:27 pm PT
Updated: May 3, 9:57 pm PT

 

S.1635 Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016 passed the Senate by unanimous consent on April 28, 2016. (See Whoa! Senate Passes @StateDept Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, FY2016).  Below is Part 1 of 6 extracted from thomas.gov for easier reading (oh, joy, the links timeout!). See below on what’s included but read the bill via congressional record in PDF or as TEXT here as alternative sources.


Sec. 101. American spaces review.

Sec. 102. Identifying bilateral investment treaty opportunities.

Sec. 103. Reinstatement of Hong Kong report.

Sec. 104. Interagency hostage recovery coordinator.

Sec. 105. United States-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue review.

Sec. 106. Report on human rights violations in Burma.

Sec. 107. Combating anti-semitism.

Sec. 108. Biotechnology grants.

Sec. 109. Definition of “use” in passport and visa offenses.

Sec. 110. Science and technology fellowships.

Sec. 111. Name changes.

Sec. 112. Anti-piracy information sharing.

Sec. 113. Report reform.

Sec. 114. Sense of Congress on the United States alliance with Japan.

Sec. 115. Sense of Congress on the defense relationship between the United States and the Republic of India.

Sec. 116. Sense of Congress on the United States alliance with the Republic of Korea.

Sec. 117. Sense of Congress on the relationship between the United States and Taiwan.

Sec. 118. Report on political freedom in Venezuela.

Sec. 119. Strategy for the Middle East in the event of a comprehensive nuclear agreement with Iran.

Sec. 120. Department of State international cyberspace policy strategy.

Sec. 121. Waiver of fees for renewal of immigrant visa for adopted child in certain situations.

Sec. 122. Sense of Congress on anti-Israel and anti-Semitic incitement within the Palestinian Authority.

Sec. 123. Support for the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity, and inviolability of post-Soviet countries in light of Russian aggression and interference.

Sec. 124. Russian propaganda report.

Sec. 125. Approval of export licences and letters of request to assist the Government of Ukraine.


Sec. 131. Atrocities prevention board.

Sec. 132. United States engagement in the Indo-Pacific.

Sec. 133. Joint action plan to combat prejudice and discrimination and to foster inclusion.

Sec. 134. Report on developing country debt sustainability.

Sec. 135. United States strategy to prevent and respond to gender-based violence globally.

Sec. 136. International corruption and accountability.

Sec. 137. Quadrennial diplomacy and development review.

Sec. 138. Disappeared persons in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador.

Sec. 139. Report on implementation by the Government of Bahrain of recommendations from the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry.

Sec. 140. Report on United States humanitarian assistance to Haiti and whether recent elections in Haiti meet international election standards.

Sec. 141. Sense of Congress with respect to the imposition of additional sanctions against the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

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