U.S. Embassy Libreville Cancels Routine Services For Sept2 Following Gabon Demonstrations

Posted: 3:24 am ET


On September 1, the US Embassy in Gabon released a security message concerning the protests and demonstrations roiling the country. It announced that it will be open for limited operations only on Friday, September 2.

The U.S. Embassy in Libreville informs U.S. citizens that widespread, violent demonstrations, rioting and looting have taken place in Libreville, particularly in the area of Cite de la Democratie-Voie Express-Boulevard Triomphal, and extending through many of the city’s central and southern neighborhoods following the announcement of presidential election results.  Further protests and demonstrations are expected in the coming days.

Security forces have responded to the situation with tear gas and have placed roadblocks at major arterial roads, cutting off transportation across the city. There is also debris and burned cars blocking the roads in some areas.

There are reports of violence in the cities of Oyem, Bitam, Port Gentil and Lambarene.

At this time the airport is open and operational and commercial flights are available.  The Embassy recommends U.S. citizens remain in a safe location and avoid non-essential movement. The Embassy continues to monitor the situation and will update you as appropriate.

Review your personal security plans, remain aware of your surroundings, including local events, and monitor local news stations for updates.  Be vigilant and take appropriate steps to enhance your personal security.

The U.S. Embassy in Libreville will be open with limited operations on Friday, September 2.  Routine consular services have been cancelled, but emergency consular services for U.S. citizens continue to be available.






US Embassy Burma: Amb Marciel Presents Credentials, Monks Protest Use of Word #Rohingya

Posted:1:52 am ET


Meanwhile — local monks protested at the U.S. Embassy in Rangoon for its use of the word “Rohingya” in its statement (PDF) about the events in Rakhine State:

The U.S. Embassy is deeply concerned about recent events in Rakhine State. We were saddened by the news about those who tragically lost their lives after a boat capsized near Thae Chaung in Sittwe Township on April 19 and we extend our condolences to the families of the victims, who local reports state were from the Rohingya community. Restrictions on access to markets, livelihoods, and other basic services in Rakhine State can lead to communities unnecessarily risking their lives in an attempt to improve their quality of life.


Turkish President Erdoğan Visits DC, His Guards Make News, and Oh, the Turkish Army Says No Coup

Posted: 2:48 am ET


Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan is in Washington this week to attend the 2016 Nuclear Security Summit.  He had a meeting with Vice President Biden today, also met briefly with Secretary Kerry and apparently waiting :-) to see President Obama during this visit. Meanwhile, President Erdoğan’s Turkish security detail made news with its demeanor towards protesters and journalists covering the visit.


Previously —

President Erdoğan won’t be back in Turkey until Sunday. Meanwhile, the Turkish Army has already threatened legal action against anyone suggesting the possibility of a military coup.

In related news, that #ErdowieErdowoErdogan video from Germany now has 4 million hits!



US Embassy Thailand: Bangkok Police Launch Inquiry Into Ambassador Davies’ Speech. Huh?

Posted: 3:21 am EDT


On November 28, Ambassador Glyn T. Davies presented his credentials to the Crown Prince on Bangkok.

Previously, Ambassador Davies gave a talk at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Thailand on Nov. 24. A few days later, Ambassador Davies got his first protest in Bangkok (see US Embassy Thailand: Ambassador Glyn Davies’ Talk Sparks Protest in Bangkok).

Apparently the Bangkok police department has now launched an inquiry into “whether a controversial speech by US ambassador Glyn T Davies condemning long prison sentences for lese majeste convictions violated Thailand’s royal defamation.”



In related news, the British Ambassador to Thailand Mark Kent, tweeted this:

According to Bangkok Post, the government has also “slammed the British ambassador’s comments “supporting law-breakers” and is considering whether to summon him for talks.” Tsk! Tsk!



US Embassy Thailand: Ambassador Glyn Davies’ Talk Sparks Protest in Bangkok

Posted: 1:22 am EDT


The US Ambassador to Thailand Glyn T. Davies was nominated by President Obama on April 14, 2015, confirmed by the Senate on August 5, and sworn in on September 14, 2015.  A career member of the Senior Foreign Service, Ambassador Davies also served as the Permanent Representative of the United States to the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Office in Vienna from June 2009 until November 2011.  He previously served as the Special Representative of the U.S. Secretary of State for North Korea Policy from January 2012 to November 2014.  Since his arrival in Thailand in September, he has traveled and acquainted himself with his host country.  Here’s Ambassador Davies during a local celebration:

Screen Shot

On November 23 Ambassador and Mrs. Davies celebrated their first Loy Krathong with Thai and American staff. The festival featured traditional Thai dances, Thai games, krathong making contests, in addition, to Ambassador and Mrs. Davies participating in a “ram wong” with other members of the Embassy community.

On Nov. 24, Ambassador Davies gave a talk at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club ofThailand. As of this writing, we have been unable to locate the transcript of Ambassador Davies’ talk at the FCCT.


Ambassador Davies quickly became a target of a protest for his recent comments on the lese majeste law:

The BBC News explained Thailand’s lese majeste laws here. Al Jazeera notes that since taking power in May 2014, Thailand’s military government has come under scrutiny for their heavy-handed application of a decades-old law written to protect the Thai royal family.

The Asian Observer has posted a lengthy list of the lese majeste charges filed since 2007.  An Asia One report  in late 2014 says that the Thai Police have dealt with more than 10,000 cases of lese majeste in recent years.


US Embassy Burundi: Students Broke Into Embassy Grounds Seeking Refuge (Updated)

Posted: 2:32 am  EDT
Updated: 3:05 PM EDT


Update via US Embassy Bujumbura on the students who entered the embassy compound:

After the Burundian National Police broke down the student camp at the construction site yesterday, the university student who sought refuge at the U.S.Embassy were allowed to stay for the afternoon and provided with water. The students remained in the Embassy parking lot until approximately 7:30 pm when they departed of their own free will after speaking with Ambassador Dawn Liberi. There was no effort to forcibly remove them.

The students relocated to a refuge run by a religious entity. The U.S. Embassy continues to work with the Government of Burundi to fully resolve this issue and has also been in contact with humanitarian organizations on behalf of the students.

Last month, the US Embassy in Bujumbura, Burundi went on ordered departure (see New #Burundi Travel Warning, Non-Emergency US Embassy Staff & Family Members Now on Ordered Departure).

On June 25, this happened:







The US Embassy released the following statement on June 25:

At approximately 1:15 pm Burundian National Police entered a construction site adjacent to the U.S. Embassy where university students set up camp seeking refuge when violence broke out in Bujumbura at the end of April and the national university was closed. The students dispersed from the site in an orderly manner and some entered the Embassy parking lot. Approximately 100 students peacefully remain in the visitor parking lot of the U.S. Embassy.

The police and students had no physical confrontation. The police officers did not resort to violence; no shots were fired and tear gas was not used. Four people suffered minor injuries during the movement. All embassy staff members are safe and accounted for.

The U.S. Embassy has contacted the Government of Burundi and urged them to find a peaceful resolution to the situation.

We understand that the students went into a lot that is outside the real embassy perimeter (as per standard embassy design). We’re also told that the gap below the gate is probably due to ground settling over the years since construction.

We should note that the embassy occupied the new embassy compound in October 2012. According to the OIG report, the embassy occupies a modern compound with an electrical generating capacity equal to that of the entire national grid. The capital cost of the new embassy compound, $137 million, is 25 percent of the national government’s annual budget.


US Embassy #Burundi Announces Evacuation Flights From Bujumbura to Kigali For May 17

Posted: 8:06 pm PDT


The State Department announced today the availability of evacuation flights for U.S. citizens in Burundi departing on Sunday, May 17, from Bujumbura to Kigali, Rwanda. Like all evacuation flights, American citizen passengers are expected to sign a promissory note promising to later reimburse the U.S. government for the cost of the evacuation.

22 U.S.C. 2671(b)(2)(A) provides that “Private United States citizens or third-country nationals, on a reimbursable basis to the maximum extent practicable, with such reimbursements to be credited to the applicable Department of State appropriation and to remain available until expended, except that no reimbursement under this clause shall be paid that is greater than the amount the person evacuated would have been charged for a reasonable commercial air fare immediately prior to the events giving rise to the evacuation.” (via FAM – pdf)

Below is an excerpt from the US Embassy Bujumbura announcement:

The U.S. Department of State wishes to inform U.S. citizens interested in departing Burundi that we are planning charter evacuation flights for Sunday, May 17, from Bujumbura, Burundi, to Kigali, Rwanda. Those wanting to travel should plan to arrive at Bujumbura International Airport no later than 10:00 a.m. Sunday morning. After that time we cannot guarantee you a flight.

The cost will be approximately $620.00 per passenger. Please note that you will be asked to sign a form agreeing to reimburse the U.S. government for your evacuation costs. As indicated in the May 15 Emergency Message, this option is open only to U.S. citizens and their immediate family members. There is a luggage allowance of 20 kilograms per traveler. Pets may be allowed on a case by case basis, provided they have a veterinary certificate, kennel (cage), and will be carried in the cargo hold of the aircraft. The weight of the pet in the kennel will count against the 20 kilograms per traveler. In addition, travelers should be prepared to pay $30 in cash for a Rwandan visa upon arrival in Kigali.

U.S. Embassy Bujumbura requests U.S. citizens who plan to use this option to depart Burundi to contact us at BurundiEmergencyUSC@state.gov to confirm your plans and obtain additional flight information, even if you already contacted us to express your interest.

The Embassy also asks U.S. citizens who are not in possession of a valid U.S. passport and who may need emergency passport services in order to leave the country to please contact the Consular Section at BujumburaC@state.gov or 22-20-7066 or 79-95-1666 with their contact information. Emergency consular services will be available at the Embassy between 7 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.

You can alert us to U.S. citizens affected by the situation in Burundi, including yourself, by visiting https://tfa.state.gov/ccd, selecting “2015 Burundi Unrest” and providing as much information as possible. You can also contact us at 1-888-407-4747 (From the United States and Canada), +1-202-501-4444 (From all other countries), and email BurundiEmergencyUSC@state.gov if you have additional questions or concerns.If you are currently in Burundi and do not have the ability to access the internet or send email,you may contact the Embassy’s consular section at +257-22-20-7000.

Read more here: http://burundi.usembassy.gov/em51615.html


Related items:

New #Burundi Travel Warning, Non-Emergency US Embassy Staff & Family Members Now on Ordered Departure

Posted: 9:46 pm  PDT


We posted this earlier today: US Embassy Burundi: Amidst Coup Attempt, No Movement of Personnel Until Further Notice. Sometime in the last 24 hours, the State Department must have decided to place the US Embassy in Bujumbura on “ordered departure.” A new Travel Warning was released today. Non-emegency personnel and family members are also ordered to depart the country.   Ordered Departure is initiated in extraordinary circumstances when the embassy is no longer confident of the security of its personnel and families. Once the Under Secretary of State for Management (“M”) approves the evacuation status for post—either authorized or ordered—the 180-day clock “begins ticking” (by law, an evacuation cannot last longer than 180 days).

The State Department also recommends that U.S. citizens currently in Burundi depart “as soon as it is feasible to do so.”   Meanwhile, the game of continues, and there are still conflicting reports on social media regarding the operating status of the Bujumbura airport.

by-map bujumbura

Below is an excerpt from the new Travel Warning dated May 14:

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens against all travel to Burundi and recommends that U.S. citizens currently in Burundi depart as soon as it is feasible to do so.  As a result of the deteriorating security situation, the Department of State ordered the departure of dependents of U.S. government personnel and non-emergency U.S. government personnel from Burundi on May 14.  The U.S. Embassy is able to offer only very limited emergency services to U.S. citizens in Burundi.  This Travel Warning supersedes the Travel Warning issued on May 11, 2015.

The security situation remains fluid and volatile because of military and security forces activity in Bujumbura.  There have been increased political tensions and civil disturbances related to these actions.  Airport and land borders are reportedly closed.  U.S. citizens should shelter in place until it is safe to move about, ensure that your travel documents are up-to-date, and confirm that air and land borders are open before attempting to depart the country.

The terrorist organization al-Shabaab, based in Somalia, has threatened to conduct terror attacks in Burundi.  It may also target U.S. interests in Burundi.  Political violence persists throughout Burundi, a carryover of the Burundian civil war. Armed groups operate in Burundi.  Weapons are easy to obtain and some ex-combatants have turned to crime or political violence.  Crime, often committed by groups of armed bandits or street children, poses the highest risk for foreign visitors.  Exchanges of gunfire and grenade attacks have increased but are usually not directed at foreigners.  If you encounter such a situation, stay indoors in a ground floor interior room away from doors and windows.  Common crimes include muggings, burglaries, and robberies.  U.S. government personnel are prohibited from walking on the streets after dark and from using local public transportation at any time.  Local authorities in any part of Burundi are often unable to provide timely assistance during an emergency.

Demonstrations, gatherings, and even sporting events that are intended to be peaceful can turn violent without advance warning.  For this reason, U.S. citizens should routinely monitor local media sources and the Internet for reports of demonstrations and unrest, and avoid political rallies, demonstrations, and crowds of any kind.

Travel outside the capital, Bujumbura, presents significant risks, especially after nightfall.  Note the U.S. embassy limits and monitors the travel of its personnel in Burundi.  All movement by embassy employees outside the city from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. is prohibited.  Likewise, U.S. citizens should not travel on national highways from dusk to dawn.  Armed criminals ambush vehicles, particularly on the roads leading out of Bujumbura.  Keep vehicle doors locked and windows up when stopped in heavy traffic.

Corruption is endemic in Burundi and contributes to an environment where the rule of law is not respected.  Government officials may ask for bribes for providing routine services.  Travelers are frequently stopped, questioned, and asked for bribes by security forces at numerous official and unofficial roadblocks throughout the country.  Likewise, criminals who have paid off local officials may operate with impunity.


US Embassy Burundi: Amidst Coup Attempt, No Movement of Personnel Until Further Notice

Posted: 10:36 am PDT


On May 14, the US Embassy in Burundi released the following Emergency Message to American citizens in the country:

In response to increasing violence in multiple locations across Bujumbura, there will be no movement of Embassy personnel until further notice. The Embassy recommends that all U.S. citizens exercise extreme caution at all times. If you are in a safe location, the Embassy recommends you remain where you are as travel in Bujumbura is not currently safe. The U.S. Embassy has received reports that the airport continues to be closed and land borders may also be closed at this time. The U.S. Embassy will continue to closely monitor the security environment in Burundi and will advise U.S. citizens further if the security situation changes.

The embassy had a town hall meeting on May 11th.  At that time, the embassy brought up the potential for an evacuation and why amcits should consider plans to leave temporarily:

We are not currently sending any of our Embassy staff or family members home. However, it is important for you to make plans and consider your options for departing Burundi if you choose to do so. It is never a wise plan to rely on the U.S. Embassy for evacuation. It is always better to leave a country while you are able to do so safely and easily. If you or your family members do not feel safe, you should consider making plans to leave, at least temporarily. This is always a personal and individual decision for private U.S. citizens. Our consular officer Kate Kigudde will speak more about consular support during a crisis, but it is important to remember that if you stay in country and the U.S. Embassy organizes an evacuation, you will not be able to bring many of your belongings or any of your family pets. We understand that these can be difficult decisions for people and we strive to give you all the information and tools you need to make the right decision for you and your family.

More updates via Twitter:











US Embassy Uruguay: Former Gitmo Detainees Keep Up Protest in Montevideo

Posted: 1:27 am EDT




Here’s a job for the Special Envoy for Closure of the Guantanamo Detention Facility. But Clifford M. Sloan who was appointed Special Envoy in 2013 departed post in December 2014 and it does not look like there is a replacement for him at this time.

And because this is 2015, the former Gitmo detainees  — Ali Shabaan (Syrian), Abdul (Tunisian), Abdul Hadi Faraj (Syrian) and Ahmed (Syrian) — now have a WordPress blog at exguantanamorefugeesinuruguay.wordpress.com, where they explained the reason for their protest:

The reason we decided to protest in front of the US embassy is that we wanted from them and from all the world to hear our voices. It´s something we didn’t want nor called for but unfortunately we were pushed to it. We tried every possible and official way, we talked to many representatives of the government but our conditions didn’t change.

We know that Uruguay is a “small country”, but with ¨big hearts”, we know that it is, as Mr Mujica said “a poor country” and that´s why we are protesting in front of the embassy because the US government detained us wrongfully for 13 years and now they should provide us with the means to live as normal human beings. They can´t just throw the mistakes on others, they should help us with houses and financial support. We are not asking the impossible from them they detained us for 13 years and they should help form some years to come. We think that this is the least they could do or we can ask for.

We also want to clarify to the Uruguayan people that we want to work and live in Uruguay. However it must be understood that this is a process that takes time; for example: our first goal is to learn spanish.

Ambassador  Julissa Reynoso, a non-career appointee left post in December 2014 and has joined Chadbourne & Parke LLP as a partner in the firm’s International Arbitration and Latin America practice groups.  The chargé d’affaires at US Embassy Montevideo is Brad Freden, a career diplomat who served at the U.S. Naval War College prior to his assignment in Uruguay.

If these protesters are waiting to speak with the U.S. ambassador, they’ll have a long wait, as a new nominee has yet to be announced.  At the Daily Press Briefing of April 30, the official spox was asked if the U.S. has any sort of financial obligations to these men, having negotiated this agreement to resettle them into Uruguay. The official response:  “We do not. As a general matter under the law of war, there is no obligation to provide direct compensation to individuals detained under the law of war for their detention.”  A reporter notes that countries do get some kind of help sometimes to resettle these people and asked if that was that part of the deal with Uruguay.  The official spox could only promised to “check in and see what our diplomatic discussions are like with countries who agree to resettle detainees.”