Nominations Caught in Cancún Cruz’s Senate Confirmation Blockage

 

The U.S. Senate is now adjourned until Monday, September 13th. Before the adjournment, it managed to confirm one (1), that’s right, one ambassador’s nomination out of over twenty State Department nominees pending on the Executive Calendar.
Below are the nominees caught in Ted Cruz’s blockage of State Department nominees. Yes, that’s the same a senator who will forever be remembered as one of the twisted tool of the January 6 insurrection. Also as Cancún Cruz, that one who fled to Mexico while his state froze.
It is unfortunate that the nominees are used as pawns when senators do not get their way. This isn’t going to change anytime soon. This has been the way of the Senate for years now. Some suggestions. We should fix the Senate by electing reasonable people who are not multiuseless. Or we should reduced the number of people requiring Senate confirmation to minimized the chaos brought about by the actions of people of multiple uselessness in the “world’s greatest deliberative body”. Oh, let’s throw in term limits, why don’t we?
DEPARTMENT OF STATE -14

Brett M. Holmgren, of Minnesota, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (Intelligence and Research), vice Ellen E. McCarthy.

Michele Jeanne Sison, of Maryland, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Career Ambassador, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (International Organization Affairs), vice Kevin Edward Moley, resigned.

Todd D. Robinson, of New Jersey, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Career Minister, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs), vice Kirsten Dawn Madison

Daniel J. Kritenbrink, of Virginia, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (East Asian and Pacific Affairs), vice David Stilwell.

Christopher P. Lu, of Virginia, to be Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations for U.N. Management and Reform, with the rank of Ambassador.

Christopher P. Lu, of Virginia, to be an Alternate Representative of the United States of America to the Sessions of the General Assembly of the United Nations, during his tenure of service as Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations for U.N. Management and Reform.

Rufus Gifford, of Massachusetts, to be Chief of Protocol, and to have the rank of Ambassador during his tenure of service, vice Sean P. Lawler, resigned.

Brian A. Nichols, of Rhode Island, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Career Minister, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (Western Hemisphere Affairs), vice Kimberly Breier, resigned

Monica P. Medina, of Maryland, to be Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, vice Kerri-Ann Jones, resigned.

Anne A. Witkowsky, of Maryland, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (Conflict and Stabilization Operations), vice Denise Natali.

Anne A. Witkowsky, of Maryland, to be Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization, vice David Malcolm Robinson.

Mary Catherine Phee, of Illinois, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (African Affairs), vice Tibor Peter Nagy, Jr

Lee Satterfield, of South Carolina, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (Educational and Cultural Affairs), vice Marie Royce.

Karen Erika Donfried, of the District of Columbia, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (European Affairs and Eurasian Affairs), vice A. Wess Mitchell, resigned.

Jessica Lewis, of Ohio, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (Political-Military Affairs), vice R. Clarke Cooper.

Donald Lu, of California, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of MinisterCounselor, to be Assistant Secretary of State for South Asian Affairs, vice Nisha Desai Biswal.

AMBASSADORS – 7

Somalia – Larry Edward Andre, Jr., of Texas, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Federal Republic of Somalia

Algeria – Elizabeth Moore Aubin, of Virginia, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria.

Lesotho – Maria E. Brewer, of Virginia, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Kingdom of Lesotho.

Cameroon – Christopher John Lamora, of Rhode Island, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of Cameroon.

Angola/Sao Tome and Principe – Tulinabo S. Mushingi, of Virginia, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of Angola, and to serve concurrently and without additional compensation as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Democratic Republic of Sao Tome and Principe.

Congo – Eugene S. Young, of New York, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of the Congo.

Vietnam- Marc Evans Knapper, of California, a Career Member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Socialist Republic of Vietnam

USAID – 3

Marcela Escobari, of Massachusetts, to be an Assistant Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, vice John Barsa.

Paloma Adams-Allen, of the District of Columbia, to be a Deputy Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, vice Bonnie Glick.

Isobel Coleman, of New York, to be a Deputy Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, vice Jenny A. McGee

 

Click to access xcalv.pdf

 

 

Related posts:

Three Current/Former @StateDept Employees Float to the Top in Crowded Bad News Cycle

/Updated 7:28 pm EST with comment from State Department.

Ugh! Three in less than three weeks!
Three current and former employees of the State Department are currently in the news. One case before the court is a political appointee arrested in connection with the January 6 insurrection.  Apparently, the individual was not happy with the accommodations at the D.C. jail.  After the charges were read, the charged individual reportedly asked the court if he could sleep where there are no cockroaches everywhere. Via WaPo:
“I wonder if there’s a place where I can stay in detention where I don’t have cockroaches crawling over me while I attempt to sleep…I mean, I really haven’t slept all that much, your honor. It would be nice if I could sleep in a place where there were not cockroaches everywhere,” Klein said.
Two other cases involved career employees. We see that there are already calls for an investigation or firing of these employees on social media. Note that unlike political appointees, career employees have certain job protections (political appointees only need a big dog to look after them, see IO).
We’ll have to wait and see what happens with these cases.  The State Department (with few exceptions)  typically will not publicize or even elaborate on personnel actions, but it is likely that any actions possibly resulting from these cases could end up in the Foreign Service Grievance System, as provided by regulations. Cases that make news, even those noted for notoriety often take a while to go through the system. Exceptions are for cases where there is a criminal offense and an individual is charged; there is no grievance case then, only a court case.
Former political appointee Federico Klein was arrested in relation to the January 6 insurrection.
On March 4, a former political appointee at the State Department Federico Klein was arrested in connection with the January 6 insurrection. According to the Statement of Facts by an FBI agent:
Based upon the information provided by Tipster 1 and Witness 1, your affiant determined that KLEIN had been an employee of the United States Department ofState (DOS) on January 6, 2021. KLEIN resigned his position on January 19, 2021. You affiant also learned that, on January 6, 2021, KLEIN possessed a Top Secret security clearance that had been renewed in 2019.
On February 10, 2021, your affiant and a DOS Diplomatic Security Special Agent interviewed an identified individual ( hereinafter“Witness 2 , former colleague of KLEIN’s at DOS. Witness 2 andKLEIN worked together from approximately February 2019 through January 2021. KLEIN was a Schedule- C political appointee who began working at DOS in 2017 in the office of Brazilian and Southern Cone Affairs. Witness 2 worked with KLEIN in-person multiple times per week throughout the time they worked together. Witness 2 reported that they had no animosity towards KLEIN. Witness 2 last saw KLEIN on January 19, 2021; Witness 2 recalled the specific date because it was prior to President Biden’s inauguration and KLEIN’s resignation from DOS. Your affiant showed Witness 2 several still photographs from a video posted on YouTube that depicted some of the events at the United States Capitol onJanuary 6 ,2021. Witness 2 positively identified KLEIN in the photos.
During the March 5 DPB,  State Department spokesperson Ned Price said: 
“… we do not have a specific comment on Mr. Klein. This is a matter that’s being investigated by the FBI, and they are the appropriate agency to answer questions specific to the charges. I believe the Department of Justice will be in a position to provide more details on those charges today.
Generally speaking, Mr. Klein served as a Schedule C presidential employee at the Department of State from 2017 until his resignation in January. He worked as a staff assistant with the transition team and as a special assistant in the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs, but we of course wouldn’t comment on any pending criminal charges.”

Diplomatic Security’s Nick Sabruno made it to CNN, and not/not in a good way:
On March 4, CNN reported that Nick Sabruno, a top State Department diplomatic security official in Afghanistan was removed from his role for declaring the “death of America” and making racist comments about Kamala Harris in a post on his Facebook page when Trump lost the presidential election. In November 2020.  Uh, SDO fella, try not to pat your back too hard, you might break it!
“I think it is completely out of line. And I am damn proud of the steps we took to remove him from post pretty damn quickly,” said a State Department official familiar with the matter.

Foreign Service Officer Fritz Berggren made the news here, there, and in Israel:
On February 26, Politico’s Nahal Toosi reported that FSO  Fritz Berggren for several years has been publicly calling for the establishment of Christian nation-states, warning that white people face “elimination” and railing against Jews as well as Black Lives Matter and other social movements. He has a blog, and is on multiple social media platforms. He is big news in Israel and the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) has called for a full investigation. As of this writing, his blog remains up and appears to have regular updates.


 

 

More Congratulations For @JoeBiden and @KamalaHarris From Around the World #USElection2020

See Part I – World Leaders Send Congratulations to @JoeBiden and @KamalaHarris #USElection2020

PARIS, FRANCE

IRELAND

 

SCOTLAND

MALDIVES

 

GREECE

BELGIUM

LITHUANIA

 

NORWAY

COSTA RICA

SWEDEN

DENMARK

CHILE

INDIA

SOUTH AFRICA

 

SENEGAL

NEW ZEALAND

IRAQ

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

 

AUSTRALIA

JAPAN

ECUADOR

OH! VENEZUELA

SOUTH KOREA

ISRAEL, NOT THE PRIME MINISTER  (HE MISSING?)

INDONESIA

President-Elect Joe Biden and VP-Elect Kamala Harris: A New Beginning #USElection2020

 

Trump’s New E.O. Launches Wrecking Ball at the Civil Service

 

On October 21, Trump issued an Executive Order on Creating Schedule F In The Excepted Service:

“Pursuant to my authority under section 3302(1) of title 5, United States Code, I find that conditions of good administration make necessary an exception to the competitive hiring rules and examinations for career positions in the Federal service of a confidential, policy-determining, policy-making, or policy-advocating character. These conditions include the need to provide agency heads with additional flexibility to assess prospective appointees without the limitations imposed by competitive service selection procedures. Placing these positions in the excepted service will mitigate undue limitations on their selection. This action will also give agencies greater ability and discretion to assess critical qualities in applicants to fill these positions, such as work ethic, judgment, and ability to meet the particular needs of the agency. These are all qualities individuals should have before wielding the authority inherent in their prospective positions, and agencies should be able to assess candidates without proceeding through complicated and elaborate competitive service processes or rating procedures that do not necessarily reflect their particular needs.”
[..]
Schedule F. Positions of a confidential, policy-determining, policy-making, or policy-advocating character not normally subject to change as a result of a Presidential transition shall be listed in Schedule F. In appointing an individual to a position in Schedule F, each agency shall follow the principle of veteran preference as far as administratively feasible.”

FedWeek notes that the “estimates of the potential number of employees affected range from the tens of thousands to 100,000 or more.”
The Partnership for Public Service released a statement that says in part ““Our civil service is the envy of the world and must be strengthened and enhanced. Without strong safeguards, the risk of hiring and firing for political reasons is high. The president’s executive order creating a new Schedule F job classification is deeply troubling and has the potential to impact wide swaths of federal employees over the next few months without engagement from Congress, civil servants and other key stakeholders.”
On October 27, 2020, H.R. 8687: To nullify the Executive Order entitled “Executive Order on Creating Schedule F In The Excepted Service”, and for other purposes was introduced in Congress. Of course, this bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then signed by the President to become law.
The new E.O. which amends the Civil Service rule, requires a preliminary review of positions covered within 90 days of the issuance of the order, that places the due date on January 19, 2020, a day before the presidential inauguration of 2021. A complete review is due within 210 days, which is August 19, 2021. Agency heads will determine which positions should be placed in Schedule F category:

Sec. 5. Agency Actions. (a) Each head of an executive agency (as defined in section 105 of title 5, United States Code, but excluding the Government Accountability Office) shall conduct, within 90 days of the date of this order, a preliminary review of agency positions covered by subchapter II of chapter 75 of title 5, United States Code, and shall conduct a complete review of such positions within 210 days of the date of this order. Thereafter, each agency head shall conduct a review of agency positions covered by subchapter II of chapter 75 of title 5, United States Code, on at least an annual basis. Following such reviews each agency head shall:

(i) for positions not excepted from the competitive service by statute, petition the Director to place in Schedule F any such competitive service, Schedule A, Schedule B, or Schedule D positions within the agency that the agency head determines to be of a confidential, policy-determining, policy-making, or policy-advocating character and that are not normally subject to change as a result of a Presidential transition. Any such petition shall include a written explanation documenting the basis for the agency head’s determination that such position should be placed in Schedule F; and

(ii) for positions excepted from the competitive service by statute, determine which such positions are of a confidential, policy-determining, policy-making, or policy-advocating character and are not normally subject to change as a result of a Presidential transition. The agency head shall publish this determination in the Federal Register. Such positions shall be considered Schedule F positions for the purposes of agency actions under sections 5(d) and 6 of this order.
[…]
(b) The requirements set forth in subsection (a) of this section shall apply to currently existing positions and newly created positions.

(c) When conducting the review required by subsection (a) of this section, each agency head should give particular consideration to the appropriateness of either petitioning the Director to place in Schedule F or including in the determination published in the Federal Register, as applicable, positions whose duties include the following:

(i) substantive participation in the advocacy for or development or formulation of policy, especially:

(A) substantive participation in the development or drafting of regulations and guidance; or

(B) substantive policy-related work in an agency or agency component that primarily focuses on policy;

(ii) the supervision of attorneys;

(iii) substantial discretion to determine the manner in which the agency exercises functions committed to the agency by law;

(iv) viewing, circulating, or otherwise working with proposed regulations, guidance, executive orders, or other non-public policy proposals or deliberations generally covered by deliberative process privilege and either:

(A) directly reporting to or regularly working with an individual appointed by either the President or an agency head who is paid at a rate not less than that earned by employees at Grade 13 of the General Schedule; or

(B) working in the agency or agency component executive secretariat (or equivalent); or

(v) conducting, on the agency’s behalf, collective bargaining negotiations under chapter 71 of title 5, United States Code.

(d) The Director shall promptly determine whether to grant any petition under subsection (a) of this section. Not later than December 31 of each year, the Director shall report to the President, through the Director of the Office of Management and Budget and the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy, concerning the number of petitions granted and denied for that year for each agency.

It looks like they expect that this would be challenged in court:

(d) If any provision of this order, or the application of any provision to any person or circumstances, is held to be invalid, the remainder of this order and the application of any of its other provisions to any other persons or circumstances shall not be affected thereby.

On October 23, 2020, OPM issued a memo with Instructions on Implementing Schedule F.

This Executive Order excepts from the competitive service positions that are of a confidential, policy-determining, policy-making, or policy-advocating character, typically filled by individuals not normally subject to replacement or change as a result of a Presidential transition. As a result of this Executive Order, such positions will be rescheduled into the newly created Schedule F and exempt from both the competitive hiring rules as well as the adverse action procedures set forth in chapter 75 of title 5 of the United States Code.
[..]
The Executive Order directs each agency head to review positions within his or her agency and identify those positions appropriately categorized as confidential, policy-determining, policy-making, or policy-advocating, and then petition OPM to place those positions in Schedule F. Agencies have 90 days to conduct a preliminary review of positions and submit petitions, with an additional 120 days to finalize that review and submit any remaining petitions.

If Biden wins, how quickly do you think this E.O. gets rescinded?
If there is a Trump second term, we expect that the wrecking ball now directed at the Civil Service will soon extend to all parts of the federal service.
Go VOTE!

Amb. P. Michael McKinley on the Politicization of the State Department

Via The Atlantic: The Politicization of the State Department Is Almost Complete by P. Michael McKinley, a former senior adviser to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and a former U.S. Ambassador to Brazil, Afghanistan, Peru, and Colombia.
I worked at the State Department for nearly four decades, in the later years as a four-time ambassador overseas and as a senior adviser to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. I have watched as Pompeo and his predecessor, Rex Tillerson, have weaponized the institution for the Trump administration’s domestic political objectives. On October 9, just weeks away from the presidential election, Pompeo announced that he would authorize, apparently at President Donald Trump’s urging, the release of more of Hillary Clinton’s emails. In doing so, Pompeo will have all but completed the politicization of the State Department, arguably bringing it to its lowest point since the 1950s. The damage may be generational.
[…]
This transformation started with Tillerson, who came in with the goal of “redesigning” the State Department and with what appears to have been a political agenda to weed out anyone who had served in leadership positions during prior presidential administrations.
[…]
As a result, more than 100 out of some 900 senior Foreign Service officers—including the most visible high-ranking Hispanic, African American, South Asian, and female career officers—were fired, pushed out, or chose to leave the State Department during the first year of the Trump administration.
[…]
The track record since my departure shows that suspicious mindset. No career official has been nominated to fill an assistant-secretary position. Political ambassadorial nominations are at an all-time high; more than 40 percent have gone to political appointees, as compared with a historical average of 30 percent. The political attendees at Pompeo’s “Madison Dinners,” and the audiences he meets with in his domestic travel, demonstrate the blurring of professional and political lines. In May, Trump fired Steve Linick, the State Department’s inspector general, who was looking into Pompeo’s activities, underscoring how the legal adviser and IG offices are being drawn into political partisanship.
[…]
The transformation is not irreversible. Career civil servants have raised the alarm about the deep damage that the Trump administration has inflicted on U.S. institutions, including the State Department. The American people will soon make a decision about whether they want to continue down this path. Come Election Day, voters will not be able to say that they did not know.
Read in full here:

Detained Ex-Campaign Staffer and Diplomatic Spouse Vitali Shkliarov Leaves Belarus

 

Office of Special Counsel Investigates Pompeo For Two Potential Hatch Act Violations

 

Pompeo Reportedly Pushing to Declare Top Human Rights Groups “Anti-Semitic”