Confirmations: 64 FS Nominations From Six Foreign Service Lists

 

On July 29, the U.S. Senate confirmed the nominations of 64 officers from six Foreign Service lists pending from April and June of this year. Click on links to see the names:
2021-07-29 PN359 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning Jeanne Frances Bailey, and ending Bruce J. Zanin, which 2 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on April 13, 2021.
2021-07-29 PN477 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning Russell Anthony Duncan, and ending Mark Clayton Prescott, which 2 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on April 27, 2021.
2021-07-29 PN478 Foreign Service | Nomination for Marc Clayton Gilkey, which nomination was received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on April 27, 2021.
2021-07-29 PN479 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning Susannah Holmes, and ending Aaron Rodgers, which 4 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on April 27, 2021.
2021-07-29 PN724 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning Gabriel J. Allison, and ending Amanda M. Zeidan, which 41 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on June 22, 2021.
2021-07-29 PN727 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning Wade C. Martin, and ending Fernando Ospina, which 14 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on June 22, 2021.

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Senate Confirms Bonnie D. Jenkins as Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security (State/T)

 

 

The U.S. Senate finally confirmed the nomination of Bonnie D. Jenkins to be the State Department’s Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security (State/T). Her nomination was received by the Senate on March 15, and she had her confirmation hearing in late April . It took the Senate until July 21st to have a full vote for this nomination. She was confirmed by the Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 52 – 48. Record Vote Number: 275. Senators Collins (R-ME), and Paul (R-KY) joined the Democrats in confirming this nominee.
Ambassador Jenkins succeeds Andrea L. Thompson who was appointed in 2018 and left her position the following year (see Pompeo Announces Departure of Andrea Thompson as Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security).  With the exception of career diplomats Reginald Bartholomew (1989–1992) and Frank G. Wisner II (1992–1993), all other appointees to the “T” bureau were political appointees. Click here for the names of previous appointees.
In May 2020, the Trump WH announced the nomination of Marshall Billingslea to State/T but that nomination was returned to the president in January 2021. (see New Arms Control Special Envoy Marshall Billingslea Now Nominated as Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security (T).

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Senate Confirms Uzra Zeya as Under Secretary of State/J (Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights)

Thank you to over 500 readers and supporters who made our continued operation possible this year. Raising funds for a small outlet that is already open and free for all to read has often been the most challenging part of running  this blog. We are grateful for your continued support and well wishes. Thanks — DS

 

 

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U.S. Senate Confirms 203 Senior Foreign Service Promotions

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On June 24, the U.S. Senate confirmed 203 nominees for Senior Foreign Service promotions:

2021-06-24 PN357-1 Foreign Service | Nominations beginning Deanna Hanek Abdeen, and ending Ellen K. Tannor, which 203 nominations were received by the Senate and appeared in the Congressional Record on April 13, 2021.

Nominees: PN357-1 — 117th Congress (2021-2022)All Information

The following-named Career Members of the Senior Foreign Service of the Department of State for promotion within the Senior Foreign Service of the United States of America, Class of Minister-Counselor:

Nominee

  • Deanna Hanek Abdeen, of VA
  • Begzat Bix Aliu, of VA
  • Jorgan Kendal Andrews, of VA
  • Mary Emma Arnold, of VA
  • Jennifer L. Bachus, of VA
  • Lance M. Bailey, of VA
  • Nicholas R. Berliner, of VA
  • Tobin J. Bradley, of DC
  • Katherine Ann Brucker, of DC
  • Robert G. Burgess, of DC
  • Michelle Ann Burton, of WA
  • Kelly S. Cecil, of FL
  • Ricardo Cifredo Colon, of VA
  • Angela Colyvas-McGinnis, of MD
  • Kathryn Taylor Crockart, of NC
  • Jill E. Darken, of IL
  • James R. Dayringer, of MO
  • Marc Douglas Dillard, of VA
  • James Edward Donegan, of VA
  • Kurt D. Donnelly, of VA
  • Abigail Lee Dressel, of CT
  • Patrick M. Dunn, of VA
  • David S. Elmo, of VA
  • Gabriel Escobar, of TX
  • Yuri P. Fedorenko, of MI
  • Tara Elizabeth Feret, of VA
  • Julie Davis Fisher, of VA
  • Kathleen A. Fitzgibbon, of VA
  • J. Robert Garverick, of VA
  • Jennifer Gavito, of MO
  • Ellen J. Germain, of NY
  • Carolyn B. Glassman, of CA
  • Ryan M. Gliha, of AZ
  • Michael Gonzales, of MD
  • Robert F. Hannan, of VA
  • Keith Lee Heffern, of VA
  • Christina Maria Huth Higgins, of VA
  • Melanie Harris Higgins, of VA
  • Elizabeth K. Horst, of DC
  • Paul R. Houston, of VA
  • Bryan D. Hunt, of VA
  • David R. Johnson, of MN
  • Mark Coolidge Johnson, of VA
  • Karen D. Kelley, of HI
  • Martin T. Kelly, of FL
  • Angela M. Kerwin, of VA
  • Cynthia A. Kierscht, of VA
  • Margaret Kurtz-Randall, of NY
  • Helen Grace LaFave, of NH
  • Daniel J. Lawton, of VA
  • Panfilo Marquez, of CA
  • Paul Overton Mayer, of VA
  • Joshua D. McDavid, of WA
  • John W. McIntyre, of TX
  • Deborah Rutledge Mennuti, of DC
  • Jonathan Robert Mennuti, of DC
  • Mario McGwinn Mesquita, of VA
  • Herro K. Mustafa, of CA
  • George M. Navadel, of TX
  • J. Robert Post, of DC
  • Timothy Meade Richardson, of MD
  • Karen Hideko Sasahara, of VA
  • Jonathan L. Shrier, of NY
  • Michael H. Smith, of ME
  • Willard Tenney Smith, of VA
  • Thomas D. Smitham, of MD
  • Howard T. Solomon, of MI
  • Linda S. Specht, of RI
  • Ellen Barbara Thorburn, of FL
  • Christina Tomlinson, of VA
  • Pamela M. Tremont, of VA
  • Hale Colburn VanKoughnett, of DC
  • Lesslie C. Viguerie, of VA
  • Peter H. Vrooman, of NY
  • JoAnne Wagner, of VA
  • Eva Anne Weigold Schultz, of VA
  • Aleisha Woodward, of VA
  • Marta Costanzo Youth, of MD
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U.S. Senate Confirms Victoria Nuland as Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs (State/P)

Once a year, we ask for your support to keep this blog and your dedicated blogger going. So here we are on Week #7 of our eight-week annual fundraising. Our previous funding ran out in August 2020. We recognize that blogging life has no certainty, and this year is no exception.  If you care what we do here, please see GFM: https://gofund.me/32671a27.  We could use your help. Grazie!  Merci! Gracias!

 

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U.S. Senate Confirms Former @USUN Amb. Samantha Power as 19th @USAID Administrator

Once a year, we ask for your support to keep this blog and your dedicated blogger going. So here we are on Week #7 of our eight-week annual fundraising. Our previous funding ran out in August 2020. We recognize that blogging life has no certainty, and this year is no exception.  If you care what we do here, please see GFM: https://gofund.me/32671a27.  We could use your help. Grazie!  Merci! Gracias!

On April 28, the U.S. Senate confirmed the nomination of former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power as the 19th USAID Administrator. She succeeds Mark Green who served as USAID Administrator under the Trump Administration from August 7, 2017 – April 10, 2020.
Excerpt below from her prepared testimony at her confirmation hearing:

“If confirmed, I will work to strengthen the institution of USAID and invest in the capabilities of the Agency’s dedicated 10,000 foreign service officers, civil servants, locally-employed staff, contractors, and other personnel. This means seeking out and amplifying their insights, learning about specific local needs, and adapting our programs. It means urgently addressing the issues relating to diversity, equity, inclusion, and advancement within USAID’s workforce. And it means emphasizing what President Biden himself has stressed: Development is critical to America’s ability to tackle the toughest problems of our time—economic, humanitarian and geopolitical. 

In consultation with you and others in Congress, I will aim to ensure that USAID enhances its longstanding leadership in food security, education, women’s empowerment, and global health, while also addressing four interconnected and gargantuan challenges confronting the world at this moment:

● The COVID-19 pandemic: With decades of development gains shattered by COVID, imperiling progress on everything from food security to gender equality and access to education, USAID’s support to partners will be vital for recovery, including by building more robust and durable health infrastructure for the future.

● Climate Change: With the surge in droughts, storms, food shortages, and climate-associated humanitarian emergencies, USAID can help countries become more resilient, while supporting their efforts to reduce carbon emissions.

● Conflict and state collapse: With more conflicts occurring today than at any point since the end of the Cold War, USAID assistance will continue to mitigate suffering, while working with US diplomats and our international partners to address the root causes of such crises.

● Democratic backsliding: With freedom declining around the world for the fifteenth year in a row, USAID’s democracy, rights, anti-corruption, and governance programming must nimbly support democratic and civil society actors as they push back against creeping authoritarianism and seek to build lasting democratic institutions.

In tackling these and other challenges, I want to assure the Committee that I will work every day to expand burden-sharing in the international system. At the United Nations, working with my administration colleagues, I was able to help secure major commitments from other countries to care for refugees, respond to the Ebola epidemic, strengthen peacekeeping, and adopt the Sustainable Development Goals. US investments are catalysts that can be used to mobilize governments, international organizations, foundations, and businesses to help countries achieve their own development goals.

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Senate Confirms Wendy Sherman as @StateDept Deputy Secretary

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Confirmations: Bill Burns as CIA Director, Brian McKeon as State D/MR; Cancún Cruz Still a Hold on Sherman

 

On March 18, the U.S. Senate confirmed by voice vote the following nominations:
  • Executive Calendar #28, William Joseph Burns, of Maryland, to be Director of the Central Intelligence Agency
  • Executive Calendar #36, Brian P. McKeon, of the District of Columbia, to be Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources
The nomination of Wendy Sherman to be Deputy Secretary of State remains pending on the Executive Calendar with the reported hold placed on her nomination by  Cancún Cruz, a senator who will forever be remembered as either one of the heroes of the January 6 insurrection or one who fled to Mexico while his state froze.


 

 

SFRC Clears Sherman, McKeon Nominations; Cancún Cruz Announces Hold

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Via senate.gov:

The senator from Texas has previously put a hold on the confirmation of Bill Burns as CIA Director.


 

 

Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield Assumes Charge @USUN

 

On February 23, Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to be the Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations (Record Vote Number: 61- Confirmed by the Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 78 – 20. ) and  to be Representative of the U..S.A. to the Security Council of the United Nations (Record Vote Number: 64 Confirmed by the Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 78 – 21).
The Chief of Mission to USUN has the title of Representative of the U.S.A. to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the U.S.A. in the Security Council of the United Nations. The U.S. Mission to the United Nations was formally established with that title, by E.O. 9844 of April 28, 1947.
According to history.state.gov, the first Representative of the U.S.A. to the United Nations was Edward Reilly Stettinius Jr. who also served as 48th Secretary of State from December 1, 1944, until June 27, 1945, under Presidents Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman. He oversaw the end of the Second World War in Europe and the creation of the United Nations. Previous non-career appointees to this position include Madeleine Korbel Albright (1993–1997) who went on to become the 64th Secretary of State and George Herbert Walker Bush (1971–1973) who became 41st POTUS.
The CRS says that President Eisenhower appears to have been the first President to accord Cabinet rank to his Permanent Representative, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., in 1953. Of the 30 individuals who have served since 1946, approximately two-thirds have been accorded Cabinet rank by Presidents.
Under the Biden Administration, the USUN Ambassador has cabinet-level status giving Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield a seat on the  National Security Council. This was not the case during her most immediate predecessor. President Biden stated  that he will accord Cabinet status to Greenfield “because I want to hear her voice on all the major foreign policy discussions we have.”
The last career diplomat appointed as Chief of Mission to USUN was John Dimitri Negroponte who served from 2001–2004. Other career diplomats appointed to this position include Edward Joseph Perkins (1992–1993), Thomas Reeve Pickering (1989–1992), and Charles Woodruff Yost (1969–1971).
Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield is only the 5th career diplomat to be appointed to this position.  It looks like she is the first female Foreign Service Officer  to hold a cabinet-level position.