James Hogan Case: Wife Gets One Year and A Day Imprisonment Plus $1,000 Fine

This blog has followed the James Hogan Case since September 2009 when the Foreign Service officer was first reported missing in the Netherlands Antilles.  In March 2012, USDOJ announced that James Hogan’s wife, Abby Beard Hogan, 50, pleaded guilty in the Northern District of Florida for her role in the obstruction of a multinational investigation into the disappearance of her husband while stationed at the U.S. Consulate in Curaçao.

We missed the news of the sentencing but on February 15, 2013, USDOJ did announce that Abby Hogan was sentenced to serve one year and one day in prison for her role in “the obstruction of a multinational investigation into the disappearance of her husband.”

In addition, she was sentenced to 2 years supervised release; $1,000 fine; and was required to self-surrender by noon on March 18, 2013. Court records indicate that the fine was paid and entered on record on March 19, 2013.

 

Via USDOJ:

Florida Woman Sentenced to Prison for Obstruction of Justice in Relation to Her Husband’s Disappearance

A Gainesville, Fla., woman was sentenced today to serve one year and one day in prison for her role in the obstruction of a multinational investigation into the disappearance of her husband, then an employee in the U.S. Consulate in Curacao, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Pamela C. Marsh for the Northern District of Florida, Director of the U.S. State Department’s Diplomatic Security Service ( DSS) Gregory B. Starr and Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Miami Field Office Michael B. Steinbach.

Abby Beard Hogan, 50, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge M. Casey Rodgers in the Northern District of Florida.   In addition to her prison term, Hogan was sentenced to two years of supervised release.   On March 29, 2012, Hogan pleaded guilty before U.S. Magistrate Judge Gary R. Jones to one count of obstruction of justice.

According to court documents, on the night of Sept. 24, 2009, Abby Hogan’s husband, James Hogan, an employee at the U.S. Consulate in Curacao, a Caribbean island that was part of the Netherlands Antilles, left his home on foot and subsequently disappeared.   In the early hours of Sept. 25, 2009, James Hogan called his wife and spoke for approximately three minutes.   The next day, when James Hogan failed to report to work, the U.S. government and Dutch and Antillean law enforcement launched an island-wide search and opened an investigation into Hogan’s disappearance.   On Sept. 25, 2009, a diver located James Hogan’s blood-stained clothing on a local beach.

According to evidence submitted in Abby Hogan’s sentencing hearing, she repeatedly provided false information to U.S. law enforcement about the time period before James Hogan’s disappearance and withheld relevant information. Abby Hogan initially told investigators that, before his disappearance, she and her husband had an argument. She subsequently modified that statement and claimed that there had been no argument, just a minor disagreement over her husband’s next assignment for the State Department.  Abby Hogan further told U.S. law enforcement agents that James Hogan had been in a “good mood” prior to leaving for his walk on the evening of his disappearance. She repeatedly denied that there had been any marital problems or that her husband had been upset or depressed in any way.  Abby Hogan further stated that she could not remember the full three-minute conversation before her husband disappeared because she was sound asleep when her husband called. She claimed she fell back asleep after the call, and did not awake until the following morning. In fact, all of these statements were false, as established by the deleted emails and other computer forensic evidence , which was submitted to the court.

According to court documents, after law enforcement interviews, between Sept. 30, 2009, and Jan. 15, 2010, Abby Hogan deleted more than 300 emails from her email account.    These emails contained information that Abby Hogan knew was relevant to specific questions she had been asked by U.S. law enforcement.   The emails also contained information that she had either previously misrepresented or knowingly omitted during her interviews with law enforcement, including that she was engaged in an extramarital affair; the night James Hogan disappeared, the couple had argued, and he left the house angry and upset; and that she did not want law enforcement to know what had happened that evening.

The case was prosecuted by Senior Trial Attorney Teresa Wallbaum of the Criminal Division’s Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section and Assistant U.S. Attorney Frank Williams for the Northern District of Florida.   The Criminal Division’s Office of International Affairs provided assistance.   The case was investigated by DSS and the FBI’s Miami Field Office and Legal Attaché Office in Bridgetown, Barbados.   Assistance was also provided by Curacao law enforcement authorities.

While this concludes this part of an almost four-year saga, we are no closer to understanding what happened to James Hogan that September night in Curaçao.

–DS

 

 

 

 

Related posts:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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James Hogan Case: A Royal Hurricane Shit Storm of Pain for All to Read

This blog has followed the James Hogan case since September 2009 when the Foreign Service officer was first reported missing in the Netherlands Antilles.  In March 2012, USDOJ announced that Abby Beard Hogan, 50, pleaded guilty in the Northern District of Florida for her role in the obstruction of a multinational investigation into the disappearance of her husband in Curacao.

The Scared Monkeys Forum recently posted some of the court documents related to this case, including the Government’s Sentencing Memorandum where it requests that the Court “impose a sentence within the applicable guideline range of 27-33 months.”

The memorandum fills in some of the details that we did not know about this story including how soon and how many agents were deployed in the search for James Hogan following his immediate disappearance and the fact that Mrs.Hogan apparently was the last person he talked to via phone before he disappeared. Excerpt via:

Within 48 hours, the U.S. government began dispatching agents from multiple domestic and foreign locations, eventually mobilizing approximately 25 agents within the first two weeks.  The Dutch and Antillean governments reacted similarly, committing significant resources to find James Hogan in the largest search in the history of the Netherland Antilles.

To this date, the disappearance of James Hogan remains unsolved, and Defendant has failed to reveal the truth of what happened that night, even declining a government request to speak after her guilty plea. Most significantly, Defendant has never told the truth about the last confirmed phone call from James Hogan after he left the house. Defendant’s claim in her March 2010 interview that she could not remember the nearly three-minute conversation because she was “groggy” is undeniably false, as her internet activity proves she was not asleep when her husband called and that she was alert enough to sign into her email account within minutes of concluding that call. This uncertainty and lack of closure has affected her family, including her children, see Email 70, and James Hogan’s mother and siblings.

A more detailed narrative of what happened is below. The full account is available here:

Sometime after 10:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 24, 2009, James Hogan – the Vice Consul at the U.S. Consulate in the Caribbean island of Curacao – left his residence in the capital city of Willemstad. Shortly after midnight on Friday, September 25, James Hogan’s cell phone (located near a tourist resort called “Lion’s Dive”) called Defendant Abby Hogan. That two minute, 58-second phone call is the last confirmed contact with James Hogan. Later that afternoon, a recreational diver discovered a pair of jeans with bloodstains, a pair of socks, and a pair of tennis shoes at a rocky beach area in Curacao known as Blue Rock. Dutch law enforcement also discovered blood on the beach and on rocks near the shore; the blood on the jeans and rocks matched James Hogan’s DNA. Investigators found James Hogan’s cell phone and a knife in the water near the blood-stained rocks. James Hogan’s body has never been found, and he is presumed dead.

American, Dutch, and Antillean officials mobilized immediately in an effort to locate James Hogan or to prevent the disposal of his body. Their primary source of information was Defendant Abby Hogan – James Hogan’s wife – who was the last known person to see or speak to him. In at least five interviews over the course of six months, Defendant told U.S. and Dutch law enforcement essentially the same story: that the evening James disappeared had been normal; that James had been in a good mood, nothing had been bothering him, and there were no marital problems. Defendant claimed that James had taken his normal evening walk and that she had taken a sleeping pill and slept through the evening. She was awakened briefly after midnight by a call from James to her cell phone. She could not remember anything from the nearly three minute conversation except that he was still out walking and she should leave the door unlocked.  She then fell back asleep and did not notice he was missing until the next morning. After her initial statement, Defendant amended her story to add that: (1) James had been worried that a recently-fired Consulate employee with a criminal record might seek revenge; and (2) someone had interrupted James during the midnight phone call.

Subsequent investigation, however, revealed that Defendant’s version of events was completely false. Defendant’s own emails (see Attach. 1) provide a timeline of events leading up to Hogan’s disappearance and disclose a household in turmoil. In March, 2009, Defendant reconnected with her high school boyfriend “Mike” (Attach. 1; Email 1). By early June, Defendant was planning a trip to Gainesville to see him (Email 2: “Do you understand I want to sleep with you?”); on August, 17, 2009, Defendant consummated the affair in Florida (Email 6).  Even before returning to Curacao, Defendant broached the idea of leaving her husband for her lover. See, e.g. Email 7 (8/27/09: “If there’s any way I can do it we are going to be together).  Within days of her return to Curacao, Defendant began exploring her options. See, e.g. Email 11  (9/1/09 email to sister asking about career options in Florida); Email 17 (9/8/09 email to friend “I’m thinking of leaving my 23+ year marriage”). Defendant, however, was concerned that James might “react very strongly” to her leaving (Email 13; Email 19); See also Email 21: (“will Jim let me leave”).

Upon her return, James Hogan became suspicious of his wife’s behavior and began asking questions about her trip. Email 10, 18, 23. Eventually, James caught his wife in a lie about seeing her high school boyfriend (Email 23), and two days before his disappearance, James discussed the lie in an email exchange (Email 25). On the night he disappeared, James Hogan used Defendant’s pink Dell laptop to make a Skype video call to his step-daughter. Afterwards, sometime around 9:00 pm, he saw Defendant’s emails, including her emails to her lover. Email 49. At 9:20 pm, four emails were forwarded from Defendant’s email account to James Hogan’s email account. See Email 33-36. These contained references to the affair. See, e.g. Email 28 & 36 (“it is very difficult for me to pretend to love him [James] when my heart is there with you.  To have sex when I don’t feel the love behind it.”) An argument ensued, which led Defendant to email her lover: “jim knows everything. it’s awful.” Email 37. During the argument, Defendant “refused to call” her lover and break off the relationship, as her husband requested, and as a result she might have “caused something terrible to happen.” Email 36.

Via Scared Monkeys Forum

Via Scared Monkeys Forum

Via Scared Monkeys Forum

More than a couple hundred emails were retrieved.  Some are posted here, a few are quite graphic, and includes some of the email exchange with the “other man” on the weeks following James’ disappearance and while the search was ongoing.

Even the other man’s concern of causing a “royal hurricane shit storm of pain” to others is an understatement.  One man is presumed dead. And life is never the same again for their children. The wife of the missing diplomat in her response to the sentencing memorandum cites the toll of constant relocation on her marriage as giving the wrong perception that the Hogans were “somehow distant or unresponsive.” The court document argues that “The correct perception, which should have been formed by those observing the Hogan family, is that they were intelligent, independent, and very adept at adjusting to difficult circumstances.”

At least one member appears to be extremely adept.  So far we have not been able to find a record of her sentencing. Our previous posts on this sad, tragic and tawdry saga are here.

 

 

 

James Hogan Case: Missing Diplomat’s Wife Pleads Guilty to Obstruction of Justice

Via USDOJ:
Florida Woman Pleads Guilty to Obstruction of Justice in Relation to Her Husband’s Disappearance
Friday, March 30, 2012

Abby Beard Hogan, 50, pleaded guilty yesterday in the Northern District of Florida for her role in the obstruction of a multinational investigation into the disappearance of her husband, James Hogan, then an employee in the U.S. Consulate in Curacao, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Pamela Cothran Marsh for the Northern District of Florida, U.S. Department of State Assistant Secretary for Diplomatic Security Eric J. Boswell and John V. Gillies, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Miami Field Office.

Abby Hogan pleaded guilty before U.S. Magistrate Judge Gary R. Jones to one count of obstruction of

Abby Hogan
(Photo from Aruba Daily)

justice. According to court documents, on the night of Sept. 24, 2009, James Hogan, an employee at the U.S. Consulate in Curacao, a Caribbean island that was part of the Netherlands Antilles, left his home on foot and subsequently disappeared.  In the early hours of Sept. 25, 2009, James Hogan called his wife and spoke for approximately three minutes.   The next day, when James Hogan failed to report to work, the U.S. government and Dutch and Antillean law enforcement launched an island-wide search and opened an investigation into Hogan’s disappearance.   On Sept. 25, 2009, a diver located James Hogan’s blood-stained clothing on a local beach.

Abby Hogan admitted that during the course of the investigation, she repeatedly provided false information to U.S. law enforcement about the time period before James Hogan’s disappearance and withheld relevant information.  Abby Hogan initially told investigators that, before his disappearance, she and her husband had an argument.   She subsequently modified that statement and claimed that there had been no argument, just a minor disagreement over her husband’s next assignment for the State Department.   Abby Hogan further told U.S. law enforcement agents that James Hogan had been in a “good mood” prior to leaving for his walk on the evening of his disappearance.   She repeatedly denied that there had been any marital problems or that her husband had been upset, depressed or suicidal in any way.   Abby Hogan further stated that she could not remember the full three-minute conversation before her husband disappeared because she was sound asleep when her husband called.   She claimed she fell back asleep after the call, and did not awake until the following morning.

According to court documents, after law enforcement interviews, between Sept. 30, 2009, and Jan. 15,

James Hogan
(Photo from ScaredMonkeys)

2010, Abby Hogan deleted more than 300 emails from her Internet email account.   These emails contained information that Abby Hogan knew was relevant to specific questions she had been asked by U.S. law enforcement.   The emails also contained information that she had either previously misrepresented or knowingly omitted during her interviews with law enforcement, including that she was engaged in an extramarital affair; the night James Hogan disappeared, the couple had argued, and he left the house angry and upset; and that she did not want law enforcement to know what had happened that evening.

Abby Hogan faces a maximum of 20 years in prison for obstruction of justice.

We have been following this case since September 2009 when FSO James Hogan was first reported missing in the Netherlands Antilles (see related posts below).  The ScaredMonkeys website has a copy of Ms. Hogan’s indictment here. The James Hogan missing flyer is still up on the US Consulate General Curacao’s website. Despite the obstruction of justice guilty plea here, we are nowhere closer to understanding what happened to Mr. Hogan over there.

Domani Spero

 

 

Related posts: (sorry about that; all links below have now been updated to diplopundit.net)

James Hogan Case: Wife of Missing Diplomat Charged with Witness Tampering, False Statements, and  Obstruction of Justice | August 26, 2011

What happened to American diplomat, James Hogan in Curacao? Dec 27, 2010

Vice Consul James Hogan: Still Missing | Aug 12, 2010

James Hogan: Now a Cold Case?| Dec 24, 2009

Vice Consul James Hogan: 1440 Hours Missing |Nov 23, 2009

James Hogan: Missing Now for 31 Days| Oct 26, 2009

US Diplomat James Hogan: 19 Days Missing| Oct 12, 2009

DNA Match in James Hogan Search |Oct 03, 2009

US Navy Joins Hogan Search in Curacao |Oct 01, 2009

US Diplomat Missing in Curacao | Sept 30, 2009

James Hogan Case: Wife of Missing Diplomat Charged with Witness Tampering, False Statements, and Obstruction of Justice

The spouse of James Hogan, the U.S. diplomat who disappeared in the Netherlands Antilles has been charged by DOJ in a multiple count indictment for her alleged role in the “obstruction of a multi-national investigation into the disappearance of her husband”:

Via DOJ:

Florida Woman Charged with Witness Tampering, False Statements, and Obstruction of Justice in Relation to Her Husband’s Disappearance
U.S. Department of Justice August 24, 2011   

WASHINGTON—A Gainesville, Florida woman was charged in a seven-count indictment filed yesterday in the Northern District of Florida for her alleged role in the obstruction of a multi-national investigation into the disappearance of her husband, James Hogan, then an employee in the U.S. Consulate in Curacao, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Criminal Division; U.S. Attorney Pamela Cothran Marsh for the Northern District of Florida; Ambassador Eric J. Boswell of the Bureau of Diplomatic Security; and John V. Gillies, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Miami Field Office.

Abby Beard Hogan, 50, was charged with two counts of making false statements to federal law enforcement officials, one count of witness tampering, and four counts of obstruction of justice. According to the indictment, on the night of Sept. 24, 2009, James Hogan, an employee at the U.S. Consulate in Curacao, a Caribbean island that was part of the Netherlands Antilles, left his home on foot and subsequently disappeared. The next day, a diver located his blood-stained clothing on a local beach. American officials and the government of Curacao and the Kingdom of the Netherlands opened an investigation into the disappearance of James Hogan.

The indictment alleges that, during the course of the investigation, Abby Hogan repeatedly provided false information to U.S. law enforcement about the time period before James Hogan’s disappearance and withheld relevant information. Abby Hogan allegedly denied, among other things, that she was having an extramarital affair and that she and her husband had argued about the affair on the night of Sept. 24, 2009. Additionally, the indictment alleges that Abby Hogan deleted multiple e-mails discussing the events leading up to and surrounding her husband’s disappearance. The indictment also alleges that Abby Hogan instructed at least one person to conceal information from investigators.

The indictment is merely an allegation, and a defendant is presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

Abby Hogan faces a maximum of five years in prison for each false statement count and 20 years in prison for each count of witness tampering and obstruction of justice.

The case is being prosecuted by Senior Trial Attorney Teresa Wallbaum of the Criminal Division’s Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section and Assistant U.S. Attorney Frank Williams for the Northern District of Florida. The Criminal Division’s Office of International Affairs provided assistance. The case is being investigated by the U.S. Department of State, Diplomatic Security Service and the FBI’s Miami Field Office and Legal Attaché Office in Bridgetown, Barbados. Assistance was also provided by Curacao law enforcement authorities.

The Latin American Herald Tribune in its coverage notes the following additional info:

Abby Beard Cope and her husband met while they were both serving as officers in the Navy in San Diego. He was a 1982 graduate of the US Naval Academy. She served for 11 years as an attorney in the Judge Advocate General legal corps and he served for 22 years as a pilot, before joining the State Department. They served 2 tours in Africa (Cote d’Ivoire and Botswana) before what was supposed to be a two year assignment in Curacao. The Hogans have 5 children.

James Hogan’s body has never been found and his disappearance remains an unsolved mystery.

This is the first indictment in the disappearance case that will mark a two year milestone next month. I’m afraid this case may take a tawdry turn before it is over.



Related posts:

What happened to American diplomat, James Hogan in Curacao?

American diplomat, James E. Hogan was reported missing in Curacao, the Netherlands Antilles on September 25, 2009.  He disappeared 15 months ago and we are no closer to understanding what happened to him. One local newspaper seems to be the only one that still report “updates” on the case this past year.

Curacao – Missing U.S. Vice Consul Hogan Case Still Open  (Extra)

U.S. Vice Consul James Hogan went missing a year-to-date. There is no news to report, but the case is still open according to Public Prosecutor Giselle Veen-Jonkhout.

Curacao – Remembrance Ceremony Vice Consul James Hogan (Extra)

There has been no declaration of death in the U.S. Vice-Consul James Hogan case, despite rumors in the media that he was declared dead, a U.S. Consulate General spokesperson said. Public Prosecutor Giselle Veen-Jonkhout and the U.S. Consulate confirmed and emphasized that the investigation is ongoing.  The U.S. Government made what is called a “finding of death” which is an administrative measure that enables his family to apply for certain benefits in connection with his U.S. Government employment. “A remembrance ceremony was held for members of the U.S. Consulate staff only, no local dignitaries were invited”, the spokesperson said. Mr. Hogan’s family has returned to the U.S.


7 FAM 280 (Presumptive Death)
states that Section 234 of the James W. Nance and Meg Donovan Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2000 and 2001 (Public Law 106-113) (22 U.S.C. 2715b) explicitly authorizes a consular officer to issue a report of death or of presumptive death in the case of a finding of death by the appropriate local authorities.  In addition it explicitly authorizes a consular officer to issue a report of presumptive death in the absence of a finding of death by the appropriate local authorities. This latter provision is intended to allow the consular officer to issue a report of presumptive death in exceptional circumstances where the evidence that the individual has died (e.g., he or she was listed on a passenger manifest on an aircraft that had no survivors) is persuasive, but local authorities have not issued and are not likely to issue a finding of death (because, e.g., issuance of a local death certificate requires forensic evidence that is not available, there is no local authority that clearly has jurisdiction, or by law a death certificate in case of presumed death may not be issued for a lengthy period such as five years).

Below is from FAM 283 when there is NO LOCAL FINDING
(CT:CON-153; 01-11-2007)
a. A United States citizen or non-citizen national may disappear or be missing in circumstances where it appears likely that the individual has died, but there is no local authority able or willing to issue a death certificate, or no judicial finding of death, or no local competent authority willing to make a finding of presumptive death. This situation may include, for example, death in a plane crash where there are no identifiable remains, death in a plane crash beyond the territory of any country, death in an avalanche, disappearance/death at sea, or other sudden disaster where the body is not immediately (or perhaps ever) recoverable.

b. Authorization of issuance. The Department (CA/OCS/ACS), with the concurrence of CA/OCS/PRI (ASKPRI@state.gov) and L/CA, may authorize the issuance of a consular report of presumptive death in such circumstances. A consular report of presumptive death may not be issued without the Department’s authorization, which must be approved by the Managing Director of CA/OCS.

c. Considerations in determining whether the Departments Consular Affairs (CA) office will authorize issuance of a Report of Presumptive Death. The Department’s decision whether to issue a Report of Presumptive Death is discretionary, and will be based on the totality of circumstances in each particular case. Although no one factor is conclusive or determinative, the Department will consider the factors cited below, among other relevant considerations, when deciding whether to authorize issuance in a particular case:

(1) Whether the death is believed to have occurred within a geographic
area where no sovereign government exercises jurisdiction;

(2) Whether the government exercising jurisdiction over the place
where the death is believed to have occurred lacks laws or
procedures for making findings of presumptive death;

(3) Whether the government exercising jurisdiction over the place
where the death is believed to have occurred requires a waiting
period exceeding five years before findings of presumptive death
may be made;

(4) Whether the person who is believed to have died was seen to be in
imminent peril by credible witnesses;

(5) Whether the person who is believed to have died is reliably known
to have been in a place which experienced a natural disaster, or
catastrophic event, that was capable of causing death;

(6) Whether the person believed to have died was listed on the certified
manifest of, and was confirmed to have boarded, an aircraft, or
vessel, which was destroyed and, despite diligent search by
competent authorities, some or all of the remains were not
recovered or could not be identified;

(7) Whether there is evidence of fraud, deception, or malicious intent.

We do not know if a report of presumptive death was officially issued in this case. And this one we still do not understand — how can an American official simply disappears from his host country of assignment and there is barely a ripple in the American press?

Related posts:

Vice Consul James Hogan: Still Missing

In November 2009, I noted that nothing in US Consulate General Curacao’s website indicated that one of its three officers had gone missing or that there was a search going on for FSO, James E. Hogan.  I don’t know how long this has been up but its “Key Consulate Links” now include ”Search for James Hogan” (pdf republished below):

I don’t have any update on this case except that I recently saw an old post by his wife, Abby in the following blog, :

Abby Hogan: 
If anyone has stories about my husband, my love of 24 years, I would love to hear them. This note was not passed along to us. I found this blog by chance. Old pix, stories, anything would be welcome, since I didn’t meet him until he was a LT and I was an ENS at HSL33. Jim is a great man, a devout Catholic, a devoted husband and father. I’ve never known another man like him.

Read more here.

The one year anniversary since he was reported missing is coming up.


Related posts:

James Hogan: Now a Cold Case?

Cold Case FilesImage via Wikipedia

AP reported a few days ago that the police spokesman in Curacao acknowledged that they have no new leads on the disappearance of Vice Consul James Hogan who was reported missing by his wife on September 25 in the Netherlands Antilles. Investigators are reportedly considering all possibilities. The report also states that a State Department spokesman Darby Holladay declined to comment on this matter. The Background Note for the Netherland Antilles even in the redesigned website of State.gov still has James E. Hogan listed as one of the three principal US officials in the country.

I can’t imagine what this must be like for his wife and children, most especially during the holidays. Our thought and prayers for the family. May they find a place inside where there’s joy, and the joy help burn out the pain of his absence.


Vice Consul James Hogan: 1440 Hours Missing | Diplopundit

Nov 24, 2009

James Hogan: Missing Now for 31 Days | Diplopundit
Oct 26, 2009

US Diplomat James Hogan: 19 Days Missing | Diplopundit
Oct 13, 2009

DNA Match in James Hogan Search | Diplopundit
Oct 03, 2009

US Navy Joins Hogan Search in Curacao
Oct 02, 2009

US Diplomat Missing in Curacao | Diplopundit
Sep 30, 2009

Vice Consul James Hogan: 1,440 Hours Missing

Now that's what I call missing.Image by robpatrick via Flickr

US Vice Consul James Edward Hogan disappeared on the night of September 24. He was reported missing by his wife, the following day. As of today, he has been missing for 60 days with no new report on the development of the search in the Netherlands Antilles. He has now been missing for 1,440 hours.

It seems like the only site that still continues to track news of his disappearance is the Scared Monkeys Missing Persons Site.

The State Department addressed the disappearance of Mr. Hogan, from best I could tell, on three occasions during the Daily Press Brief in October.

Daily Press Briefing – October 1

Daily Press Briefing – October 2

Daily Press Briefing – October 5

An email inquiry sent to Timothy J. Dunn, the Chief of Mission/Consul General at the US Consulate General in Curacao has not been returned. Nothing on its website indicates that one of its three officers has gone missing or that there is a search going on.

In contrast, when US Defense Attaché, Thomas Mooney disappeared from the US Embassy in Cyprus on June 28, 2007, the U.S. Embassy there issued a public appeal for information on the whereabouts of Colonel Mooney. The NYT reported that “an announcement posted on the embassy’s Web site urged anyone with information “which might be helpful in locating him” to contact the police.”

And at the sad conclusion of LTC Thomas Mooney’s disappearance, then Ambassador Ronald Schlicher released an official statement also posted on its embassy’s website.

James Hogan: Missing Now for 31 Days

US Vice Consul James Hogan was reported missing by his wife on September 25 in Curacao, the Netherlands Antilles. Today marks a month since he went missing. There seems to be no new developments on the search conducted by local authorities in the islands. I unearthed the video below from YouTube (sorry, no translation available) and another one here, both talking about the search and the police’s effort in soliciting the public’s assistance in their search. It includes snippets of James Hogan on video.

Digger of Life After Jerusalem pointed out recently that James Hogan just made the promotion from FS-04 to FS-03. The promotion list was dated October 9.

An AP report dated Oct 12, 2009 cited James Hogan’s brother, Paul saying that the family would not comment out of concern for the privacy of the diplomat’s wife and his five children.

On October 18, FS blogger, Globetrotter came back from a three-week TDY in Curacao. He understandably does not have a lot to say except that “It has been an interesting experience, but a difficult one under the circumstances. I’m glad for the opportunity to serve and help out at a trying time.”

This is such a gut-wrenching occasion, I can’t even begin to imagine what this must be like to the family and the small community at the US Consulate General in Curacao. What makes me feel really bad is how his disappearance seems to have fallen off the face of the earth just like that … no more news coverage updating us on the search …

Related Posts:

US Diplomat James Hogan: 19 Days Missing

Bild tagen från Seaquarium mot Willemstad på C...Image via Wikipedia

Reported missing since 9/25/2009


Radio Netherlands Worldwide has an update on the search for missing US diplomat James Hogan in Curacao, the Netherlands Antilles:

In a special television broadcast police in the Dutch Antilles island Curacao have appealed for information to help solve the case of the missing US vice consul James Hogan.

It is unclear where the 49-year-old vice consul went after he left his home on foot to go for a walk at about 11 p.m. on Thursday, 24 September. His wife reported him missing the next morning. A passer-by found some of his clothes – a pair of jeans, socks and shoes – neatly folded but covered with blood, on Baya Beach, many kilometres from his home. A large kitchen knife also covered in blood was found nearby. Tests revealed that the blood did in fact belong to Mr Hogan. His mobile telephone was found later in the water.

In the TV broadcast police asked the public for any information about events that night. The police appear to have very few leads at the moment.

The police are especially keen to get in touch with the driver of a white two-door BMW, although no reason was given as to why.

Read the whole thing here.

The disappearance of James Hogan which was never really picked up by the MSM in the US has even less coverage now, 19 days after he was reported missing in Curacao.