Ambassador Mark Green Steps Down as USAID Administrator

On March 16, 2020, USAID Administrator Mark Green announced his plans “to leave USAID and return to the private sector next month.” He served for two and a half years at USAID. He said “With the vision and dedication of the men and women of USAID, the Agency has done unceasing and robust work to change and improve the power of foreign assistance to help our partner nations on their Journeys to Self-Reliance. The purpose of foreign assistance is to end the need for its existence. The work of USAID every day provides a powerful return on investment to the American taxpayers for our national security, our economic growth – this generosity is simply in our DNA as a country.”
Ambassador Green officially ended his tenure on April 10, 2020. Three names have been reported as potential successor:  Jim Richardson (currently State/F)  and Pompeo’s chief of staff when he was at the U.S. House of Representatives; Rep. Ted Yoho, a Republican from Florida; Ed Royce, the former Republican congressman from California and chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee (HFAC).

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Another Dual-Hatter? Marshall Billingslea Joins @StateDept as Special Presidential Envoy for Arms Control

 

Marshall Billingslea was confirmed by the United States Senate to serve as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury in June 2017. As of today, five days after the WH announcement, Mr. Billingslea’s bio is still up at the Department of Treasury website. Making folks wonder if this is another of those dual-hatted appointees, with Mr. Billingslea straddling two positions at State and Treasury.
State Department statement on the appointment of Marshall Billingslea:

President Trump has appointed Marshall Billingslea as Special Presidential Envoy for Arms Control.  In this role, Billingslea will lead arms control negotiations on behalf of the U.S. Government.

Mr. Billingslea most recently has been serving as Assistant Secretary for Terrorist Financing at the U.S. Department of Treasury since June 2017.  In that role, he has built international coalitions and led U.S. efforts to counter illicit financial activities.  In 2018 he was selected unanimously by the 37 member countries of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) — the global anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing body — to serve as its President.  Mr. Billingslea also co-chairs the global Counter-ISIS Finance Group and multiple bilateral negotiating fora with friendly and allied nations.  He has deep expertise in arms control and broad experience in foreign policy and national security, having held senior positions in the private sector, NATO, the Department of Defense and on the staff of the United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.

Billingslea holds a Bachelor of Arts from Dartmouth College and a Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy from Tufts University.

The United States remains committed to effective arms control that advances U.S., allied, and partner security; is verifiable and enforceable; and includes partners that comply responsibly with their obligations.  President Trump has charged this Administration with beginning a new chapter by seeking a new era of arms control that moves beyond the bilateral treaties of the past.  The appointment of Marshall Billingslea reaffirms the commitment to that mission.

 

Snapshot: @StateDept COVID-19 Cases as of April 14, 2020

Note that with the April 10 update, the State Department removed the “pending tests” category, so we no longer have a view on how many pending tests are there at our overseas posts.  DOS also replaced “positive cases” with “current cases.”  According to the State Department, a current case is “a person with a positive COVID-19 test or clinical diagnosis and not confirmed to have recovered.” 
Instead of a “self-isolating” category, State is now calling this category “Remain at home” or individuals  “advised to remain at home because of contact with a known COVID-19 case or or travel to a high-risk area.” 
On the domestic side, “persons remaining at home” are no longer tracked according to State after stay at home orders/telework instructions were broadly issued.

 

Updated: April 14, 2020, 3:00 p.m. EDT

Any diplomatic posts overseas having issues obtaining proper PPE?

 

Via Briefing With Dr. William Walters, Deputy Chief Medical Officer for Operations, and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Ian Brownlee, Bureau of Consular Affairs On COVID-19:  Updates on Health Impact and Assistance for American Citizens Abroad | APRIL 14, 2020

QUESTION:  Hey, thank you.  Have you heard from any of the diplomatic posts overseas that they are having issues obtaining proper PPE given kind of the global shortages, particularly those who are interacting with folks who are being repatriated? 

DR WALTERS:  Yeah, it’s Doc Walters.  So with regard to PPE overseas, our – as part of our ongoing preparedness well in advance of this pandemic, the Bureau of Medical Services has small stockpiles of PPE and other countermeasures at each post.  We have supplemented that, again, well in advance of the crush on the supply chain that’s occurred.  And so our health care providers overseas and our consular officers are provided with PPE appropriate to their interaction, understanding that there are going to be times when you come into unexpected contact with American citizens and no one’s going to stop what they’re doing in helping an American citizen.

But we – as part of the safety net, both there’s the PPE side, but there’s also the small community in each of our posts that is overseen by a medical provider from the bureau, either a direct hire or locally employed, and that – that drives the statistics that I provide at the beginning of each one of these briefs, and what we’re seeing is a fairly flat curve and no ongoing employee-to-employee transmission patterns that we’ve been able to identify.

 

COVID-19 Tracker: State Department and Foreign Service Posts (April 14 Update)

Our COVID-19 tracker has large gaps in it, but we don’t have a better alternative on breakdowns as the State Department is only releasing total numbers, not locations.  We have updated our tracker to include the two confirmed FSN deaths in Jakarta, Indonesia and Kinshasa, DRC, and one confirmed FSN death at an undeclared location. There are currently two domestic deaths, one in NYC, a contractor, and one in Washington, D.C. at an undeclared office location, a Civil Service employee.

DOS Briefing 4/14/20: The State Department continues to strongly enforce and practice the appropriate social distancing and other non-pharmaceutical interventions, and that continues to be reflected in our own disease curves.  Currently there are – we’re tracking 297 overseas cases, including 182 active with 115 recovered, holding at – thankfully holding at three overseas deaths, all within locally employed staff. Domestic cases are 71 current cases, 67 with four recovered.  Important to note that we started to see domestic cases in the second into the third week of March, and so this is the point at which we would expect to see those cases start to recover.  So I would anticipate over the next week, we’ll start to see the recovery cases start to climb. I am saddened to say that we’ve had our first – our second domestic death, our first within the U.S. direct-hire population, a civil servant serving here in Washington, D.C.  And our condolences do go out to the family and to all families that have been impacted by coronavirus.”

DOS Briefing 3/23/20 “I can tell you we’re still at single digits here in the United States with cases – one each, two each, three each in Washington; Houston; Boston; New York; Quantico, Virginia; and Seattle.  So the numbers themselves are – overseas are still double-digit.  We’re looking at less than 30 scattered over 220 posts around the world, and it remains a challenge.” 

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