U.S. Diplomats at Embassy Manila Eat the Most Terrifying Food in the World #fooddiplomacy

 

So cracked.com has a list of the 6 Most Terrifying Food in the World and the U.S. diplomatic mission in the Philippines has a surprise for all of us!

6) Mexico’s Escamoles  – the eggs of the giant black Liometopum ant, which makes its home in the root systems of maguey and agave plants

5) Italy’s Cazu Marzu — this is a sheep’ milk cheese that has been deliberately infested by a Piophila casei, the “cheese fly” which results in “a maggot-ridden, weeping stink bomb in an advanced state of decomposition”

4) Norway’s Lutefisk – this is “a traditional Norwegian dish featuring cod that has been steeped for many days in a solution of lye, until its flesh is caustic enough to dissolve silver cutlery”

3) Korea’s Baby Mice Wine “a traditional Chinese and Korean “health tonic,” which apparently tastes like raw gasoline”

2) Iraq’s Pacha or to put it simply, boiled sheep’ head, and as the cracked writers put it, “Burp while ye may,” the sockets say, “for the same fate will happen to you–and all too soon.”

1) Philippines’ Balut – “duck eggs that have been incubated until the fetus is all feathery and beaky, and then boiled alive. The bones give the eggs a uniquely crunchy texture.”

Below is a video clip of our diplomats in the Philippines eating not #6 or #2; they had to show us how to eat #1, those “crunchy” baby duck eggs!!!

NOTE: We have no/no plans of trying any of them anytime soon, thank you very much but let us know if your post has a video to share.

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@StateDept’s Aviation Program Down to Just 206 Aircraft, Also Spends $72M on Unnecessary Services

Per 2 FAM 800: INL/A serves as the Departments aviation service provider (with the exception of aircraft charters managed by A/LM/OPS for logistics support of nonrecurring and unpredictable requirements like oddly-sized shipments, evacuations and other emergency assistance to Posts) and is coordinator of all aviation related to AGB [Aviation Governing Board] approved acquisitions.  INL/A is responsible for complying with the provisions of this chapter as well as OMB Circulars A-126, A-76, A-11, and A-94 and Federal Management Regulation 10233. Additionally, as part of the Departments Management Control Plan (see 2 FAM 020), INL/A must establish cost-effective management control systems to ensure that aviation programs are managed effectively, efficiently, economically, and with integrity.

Excerpt below via State/OIG:  Audit of the Department of State’s Administration of its Aviation Program (Sept 2018).

The Department is not consistently administering its aviation program in accordance with Federal requirements or Department guidelines. Specifically, OIG found instances in which significant aviation operations were undertaken without the knowledge or approval of the AGB, which is required by Department policy. In addition, the AGB is not fulfilling its responsibilities to evaluate the usage and cost effectiveness of aircraft services, as required by Office of Management and Budget Circulars and Department guidance. Furthermore, INL administer ed country-specific aviation programs differently depending on whether a post used the worldwide aviation support services contract. As a result of limited AGB oversight and the absence of evaluations to determine the appropriate usage and cost effectiveness of the Department’s aircraft operations worldwide, the Department is not optimally managing aviation resources and spent $72 million on unnecessary services from September 2013 to August 2017.

Snapshot: The Department’s aviation program was created in 1976 to support narcotics interdiction and drug crop eradication programs. The aviation program has since grown to a fleet of 206 aircraft and aviation operations that extend from South America to Asia and include transportation services for chief of mission personnel. In 2016, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) reported that the Department owned more aircraft than any other non-military agency and was one of three agencies with the most “non-operational” aircraft. At the time of GAO’s analysis, the Department had 248 aircraft; the Department has since decreased that number to 206. As shown in Figure 1, as of January 2018, the aircraft inventory included airplanes (fixed-wing), helicopters (rotary-wing), and unmanned aircraft.

As of January 2018, the Department had aviation operating bases overseas in five countries —Colombia, Peru, Panama, Afghanistan, and Iraq —and a support base at Patrick Air Force Base located in Melbourne, FL. The Department closed aviation programs in Cyprus and Pakistan during 2017. The Department plans to re-open an operating base in Guatemala. In addition, the Department has two dedicated chartered aircraft located in Cartersville,GA, and Nairobi, Kenya.

The Department’s Aviation Governing Board (AGB) is responsible for providing oversight of aviation activities, including approving policies, budgets, and strategic plans. The AGB was established in 2011. It is chaired by the Assistant Secretary of the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) and has three other voting members—the Assistant Secretaries (or designees) from the Bureaus of Diplomatic Security, South and Central Asian Affairs, and Near Eastern Affairs.

INL/A consists of approximately 60 Civil Service personnel and 13 personal services contractors. To carry out the Department’s aircraft operations, maintenance, and logistics for the country-specific aviation programs, INL/A administers and oversees a worldwide aviation support services contract that provides a contract workforce of more than 1,500 personnel. According to an INL/A official, starting November 1, 2017, DynCorp International began its fifth extension of a $4.9 billion worldwide aviation services contract.

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Wendy Sherman: Not for the Faint of Heart (Book Preview)

Via Amazon

Wendy Sherman has become best known as the United States’ lead negotiator on the multilateral Iran Nuclear Deal from 2015, but has had a long and distinguished career as a diplomat since she joined the State Department in 1993. By the end of the Clinton administration, she was a key aide to secretary of state Madeleine Albright. She was named special advisor to President Clinton and policy coordinator on North Korea, managing, among other special assignments, negotiations with Pyongyang on nuclear nonproliferation.

With Albright, Sherman cofounded the advisory firm Albright Stonebridge Group in Washington before returning to the State Department as undersecretary for political affairs in 2011. She spent the following four years pursuing the nuclear agreement with Iran while overseeing the bureaus for Africa, East Asia and the Pacific, Europe and Eurasia, the Near East, South and Central Asia, the Western Hemisphere, and International Organizations.

“A powerful, deeply personal, and absorbing book written by one of America’s smartest and most dedicated diplomats. This tale of courage and persistence will inspire readers of all backgrounds, while giving them unparalleled insights into some of the most critical issues of our time.”―Madeleine K. Albright, 64th U.S. Secretary of State

“Wendy doesn’t just write about the value of courage, power, and persistence, she lives it. She’s an example that a strong negotiator can also be a humane mentor. Her work helped prevent a war and a stop a nuclear arms race. As someone who has been privileged to be Wendy’s teammate and even more grateful to remain her friend, I know every reader will learn much from her story but even more from her example.”―John Kerry, 68th U.S. Secretary of State and author of Every Day Is Extra

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