Amb Nikki Haley’s Manhattan Curtains Make a News Splash But Wait …

 

So Nikki Haley’s New York curtains made the news.  According to the NYT, the State Department spent $52,701 for curtains in UN Ambassador Nikki Haley’s Manhattan apartment.

According to the report, the USG leased the property located at Norman Foster’s 50 UN Plaza Penthouse after the State Department ditched the Waldorf Astoria as the USUN ambassador’s residence in 2016. This happened following the purchased of the Waldorf hotel by a Chinese insurance company with a murky ownership structure.There is reportedly an option to buy this property.  Ambassador Haley is the first ambassador to live in it.

Given the news about various questionable and outrageous expenses across agencies in D.C., and particularly with the funding issues with the State Department when the curtain purchase was expended in 2017, we could be tempted to lump this together with all the swampy behavior in the news.  To be sure, these curtains cost almost as much as the median household income in 2017, and the curtains don’t have to do anything but look clean and nice, and keep prying eyes away. However, we should note that the previous USUN ambassador’s residence at the Waldorf had been previously occupied by other ambassadors and would have been already furnished. This was not a case of she did not like the curtains, and asked that they be replaced. This chief of mission residence (CMR) is a new 5,893 ft² rental, and unless rented furnished, probably required new furnishing, and, of course, new curtains … in a city where the cost of living is 138.6% above U.S. average.

One source familiar with State Department real estate told us that this would be considered part of the “make ready” improvements when the Department takes possession of a property. In some places overseas, it could include not just curtains but also American size washers/dryers. In Africa, it could include generators. We’ve heard of a $40K drapes at some unidentified post. Can you imagine what it would cost to replace the drapes at the U.S. Ambassador’s residence in London or Paris?  Of course, non-career folks always have the option to spend their own money whether on CMR curtains or in 4th of July parties but that’s another story.

One former fed told us that given the hiring freeze and the drastic cuts in State funding, that this shouldn’t have gone through. We understand that perspective but remember that Foggy Bottom was Crazytown Also in 2017 with almost all bureaus vacant at the top.  Which acting official should have cancelled this purchase, only to rewrite the purchase order for the necessary expense months later? The NYT report cites Patrick Kennedy, the former Under Secretary for Management at State who defended the purpose of this purchase for entertainment and security. Would Diplomatic Security have allowed occupancy without curtains? Which country or countries might have potential spies/prying eyes directed at this 40th floor penthouse?

Perhaps, it should also be noted that an ambassador’s residence is used not just as living quarters for the chief of mission and his/her family, it is also used as a venue for diplomatic representations, receptions and events.  In many ways, the official chief of mission residences are similar to US embassies abroad; they are representations of the United States. We’d suggest that this expenditure would have been made even if the appointee were a career diplomat.

But there’s some good news! These curtains will likely stay there throughout Haley’s tenure and the next ambassador’s tenure. Unless Scott Pruitt gets appointed to USUN, in which case, we should probably prepare ourselves for mechanized bulletproof curtains in the first 100 days!

Below is the  description of the property via Street Easy (see link for photos).

A rare opportunity is available to rent this full floor condominium on the 40th floor facing all four directions.If you are looking for the best, this is the highest and largest penthouse available for rent in this unique midtown United Nations location. A tad shy of 6,000 sq feet! With views of the Empire State Building and Chrysler Building, this coveted condominium across the street from the UN has floor to ceiling glass walls with bay windows throughout and a living/dining room overlooking the beautiful East River. Enjoy the boats and yachts passing by going downtown as well as magnificent skyline views at night. Conveniently located all on one level, this home features corner living and dining rooms as well and two corner master bedrooms. The 11’3″ ceiling height allows for beautiful sunsets and sunrises every day. There are five bedrooms, all with en suite baths with high quality natural stones, some with windows and separate showers stalls and bidets. The interior finishes throughout include custom hardware, and solid white oak floors. The large eat-in-kitchen is outfitted with Varenna white lacquer cabinetry and high end appliances. There are two maids bedrooms in addition and 6.5 baths in total. This masterpiece is designed by the world renowned Architect, Sr. Norman Foster. Cleverly combining Glass with steel to allow natural light into every home, this building boasts elegance from the motor-court lobby with 16′ soaring ceilings and water fall and fireplace, to the wellness center with a 75 foot swimming pool and state-of-the-art fitness facility. A beautiful building that has it all! In addition, this full service property with resident manager, concierge, and valet service also has a conference room, steam, sauna, treatment room, play room, cold storage and bike storage. This penthouse includes valet parking at no additional cost!

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Career Diplomat Lucia Piazza Talks About Surviving an Embassy Attack

Six years ago today, protesters attacked the US Embassy Tunis compound in Tunisia and torched the vehicles in the diplomatic compound (see US Embassy Tunisia: Protesters breach and set compound on fire (video); Embassy now on Ordered Departure).  Below is a TEDxFoggyBottom talk from June by a career diplomat who was there during that 2012 attack on Embassy Tunis. 

This is something to watch, especially for folks who do not quite understand the Foreign Service, or appreciate how career FS people many, many times had to tell their loved ones goodbye, send them off to safety without knowing if they will see them again, while they stay to do the jobs they are tasked to do in foreign countries that are often hostile and dangerous. 

Via YouTube/TEDx Talks

What does it take to survive a deadly attack on an embassy? For career Foreign Service Officer Lucia Piazza, strong leadership before a crisis is key to saving lives under pressure. Lucia Piazza is the Director of Crisis Management and Strategy in the Office of the Secretary of State. A career Foreign Service Officer, since joining the State Department in 2001 Lucia has represented the US government as a diplomat in countries throughout Africa and the Middle East. Lucia received a Master of Science degree in National Security Strategy from the National War College, National Defense University and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of New Hampshire. She is the recipient of multiple awards including two Superior Honor Awards for her leadership during the 2012 attack on Embassy Tunis and a Superior Honor Award in 2017 for her leadership of the State Department’s response to Hurricanes Irma, Jose, and Maria when she and her team oversaw the evacuation and repatriation of over 3000 U.S. citizens. Lucia speaks Arabic, French, Italian, and Spanish. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

 

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Michael McFaul: From Cold War to Hot Peace (Book Excerpt)

Via Amazon:

MICHAEL McFAUL is professor of political science, director and senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. He served for five years in the Obama administration, first at the White House as special assistant to the president and senior director for Russian and Eurasian affairs at the National Security Council, then as U.S. ambassador to the Russian Federation. Dr. McFaul is also an analyst for NBC News and a contributing columnist to the Washington Post. He has authored or coauthored several books, including Russia’s Unfinished Revolution: Political Change from Gorbachev to Putin. Dr. McFaul was born and raised in Montana. He received his B.A. in international relations and Slavic languages and his M.A. in Soviet and East European studies from Stanford University, then completed his D. Phil. in international relations at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar.

“Mike McFaul has lived history. In this terrific book, he recounts a pivotal time in U.S.-Russian relations, bringing the perspective of a central participant and one of America’s finest scholars of Russian politics. This book will be valued by students, experts, historians and diplomats for years to come. It is a good read and an invaluable contribution at a crucial time.” —Condoleezza Rice, former Secretary of State under George W. Bush (2005-2009)

“As both a first-hand observer and a key participant in many of the recent events that have shaped US-Russia relations, Ambassador McFaul has an important story to tell. From Cold War to Hot Peace is a gripping and intensely personal account of one of the most complex and consequential geopolitical developments of our time.” —Madeleine Albright, former Secretary of State under Bill Clinton (1997-2001)

“This is an indispensable book for understanding the threat our country faces from Vladimir Putin’s Russia. McFaul is a candid and insightful guide to the history, personalities, and politics that continue to shape one of America’s most consequential relationships.” —Hillary Rodham Clinton, former Secretary of State under Barack Obama (2009-2013)

“Mike McFaul gives us a broad, thoughtful analysis of a critical shift in world affairs. Read From Cold War to Hot Peace for timely, informative, and intriguing insights on changing US-Russia relations.” —George P. Shultz, former Secretary of State under Ronald Reagan (1982-1989)

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