Americans Held Hostage at US Embassy Tehran For 444 Days Win Compensation After 36 Years. Finally!

Posted: 4:47  pm EDT
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Very happy to see that this finally happened after so long a wait!

Via NYT:

After spending 444 days in captivity, and more than 30 years seeking restitution, the Americans taken hostage at the United States Embassy in Tehran in 1979 have finally won compensation.

Buried in the huge spending bill signed into law last Friday are provisions that would give each of the 53 hostages or their estates up to $4.4 million. Victims of other state-sponsored terrorist attacks such as the 1998 American Embassy bombings in East Africa would also be eligible for benefits under the law.
[…]
The law authorizes payments of up to $10,000 per day of captivity for each of the 53 hostages, 37 of whom are still alive. Fifty-two hostages were released on Jan. 20, 1981; a 53rd hostage had been released earlier because of illness. Spouses and children are authorized to receive a lump payment of as much as $600,000.
[….]
Some former hostages and their family members had expressed frustration at the Justice and State Departments for blocking efforts over the years to get compensation. In a sense, the spending bill represents Congress’s taking control of the BNP Paribas money back from the Justice Department.  Some hostages did not want to discuss the legislation. “It’s enough,” said Barry Rosen, who was a press attaché at the embassy. “We’ve gone through enough.”

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Related posts:

The Iran Hostages: Long History of Efforts to Obtain Compensation (August 2015)

State Dept Updates 3 FAM 4140 Guidelines For USG Personnel Taken Hostage (September 2015)

Former Iran Hostage John Limbert on Bibi’s Bizarre Piece of Diplomacy (March 2015)

November 4, 1979: Iranian Mob Attacks US Embassy Tehran; Hostages Compensated $50/Day (November 2013)

Supremes Say No to Appeal from US Embassy Iran Hostages (May 2012)

Iranian Mob Attacks British Embassy in Tehran — It’s Dejavu All Over Again! (November 2011)

January 20, 1981: The Iran Hostages – 30 Years Later  (January 2011)

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Happy Holidays — go wild with these photos for your desktop!

Posted: 3:43 am EDT
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Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to everyone who celebrates the season! Sending warm thoughts and good wishes to our readers, blog friends, and Foreign Service personnel and their families serving here and around the world.  May your holidays be quiet and peaceful; and may the universe keep you safe wherever you are!

To those who wrote to check on us, thank you for your thoughts. The blog is good for a couple more months. We’ll save the update after the holidays.

The photos below are desktop wallpapers.  The whale photos are from the US Embassy in New Zealand. They are of humpback whales taken just offshore from Rarotonga. If you want to check out the rest, click here. There are also selected photos below from US Embassy Nepal, US Embassy Chile, and photos from Alaska and Arizona via the IIP Photo Archive. To download the photos as wallpaper for your computer, right click on the photo, then “save image as”…. on your computer.

Wishing you all the gifts of the season — Peace, Joy, Hope!

♥️ D

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Humpback whale just offshore from Rarotonga. Photo from US Embassy New Zealand/Flickr

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Humpback whale just offshore from Rarotonga.  Photo from US Embassy New Zealand/Flickr

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Upper Mustang formerly Kingdom of Lo, a remote and isolated region of the Nepalese Himalayas. Via US Embassy Nepal/Flickr

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Lovejoy Comet over Andacollo, captured by the Las Campanas Observatory. Via US Embassy Chile/Flickr

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Alaska autumn Sunrise at Pilgrim Hot Springs outside of Nome, Alaska. Photo by U.S. Department of Energy / CPike, Alaska Center for Energy and Power (ACEP). Via IIP Photo Archive

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Dark Sky Park at night | The Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument in Arizona is a vast remote landscape where the only nighttime light comes from the stars. Photo by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Managment (BLM). Via IIP Photo Archive

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