U.S. Embassy Djibouti to Close to the Public on Thursday, March 19 for Security Posture Review

Posted: 5:38 pm PDT
[twitter-follow screen_name=’Diplopundit’ ]

 

On March 18, the U.S. Embassy in Djibouti sent out a security message informing Americans residing in the country that it will be closed to the public on Thursday, March 19, to review its security posture.  The statement says that the Embassy will reopen for regular business on Sunday, March 22.  Emergency consular services for U.S. citizens will be available.

All U.S. citizens are encouraged to maintain a high level of vigilance and take appropriate steps to enhance your personal security, follow instructions of local authorities, and read the most current Travel Warnings and Country Specific Information for Djibouti.
[…]
The U.S. Embassy in Djibouti is located at Lotissement Haramous Lot # 350B. You can contact the Consular Section of the Embassy via email at ConsularDjibouti@State.gov or by phone at, tel.  +(253) 21-45-30-00.   For after-hours emergencies, please call +(253) 77-87-72-29.

Map of Djibouti

Map from CIA World Factbook

The State Department had previously released a Travel Warning for Djibouti in November 2014 warning U.S. citizens of the risks of traveling to Djibouti. It also urged U.S. citizens in Djibouti to evaluate their personal security situation in light of specific threats from terrorism.

The U.S. government continues to receive information about potential terrorist threats aimed at Western (including U.S.) and Djiboutian interests in Djibouti.  Terrorist acts can include suicide operations, bombings (to include car bombings), kidnappings, attacks on civil aviation, and attacks on maritime vessels in or near Djiboutian ports.  Attacks may target official government facilities, including Embassies and military installations, as well as soft targets such as restaurants, clubs, hotels, and other commercial entities.  While Djiboutian officials continue the pursuit of those responsible for previous terrorist attacks, many of those involved remain at large and still operate in the region.  Travelers should also consult the Worldwide Cautionfor further information and details.

On May 24, 2014, two suicide bombers attacked a restaurant popular with Westerners in Djibouti’s city center.  One person was killed and others were severely injured.  Al Shabaab claimed responsibility for this attack, and renewed its previously stated intent to conduct similar attacks in Djibouti against both Djiboutian and Western targets.  These threats have been regularly repeated since 2011, following Djibouti’s commitment to contribute forces to the African Union Mission in Somali (AMISOM).

#

 

Advertisements