What’s Next for Diplopundit? Need to be a Tree Some Place…

I started blogging on March 11, 2008 about a health care proposal that would have extended health coverage for the children of federal employees. That seems so long ago.

Back then Diplopundit had very few followers and about a dozen readers. We ended 2008 with some 8,000 visitors and 12,000 page views.
In September 2009, this blog hit its first 100,000 page views. Shortly after that I wrote my 1,000th blog post. We now have several more followers and many more readers. We ended 2009 with over 110,000 visitors which tallied at 13 times the number of our visitors in the previous year. Our page views increased 1,225 percent. Our subscribers went from something like eleven to over 300. These metrics are reassuring but they don’t tell the whole story. I appreciated every note, every question and every learning opportunity you sent my way.
Blogging at Diplopundit has been one of the best experiences in the world — not only because I enjoy doing it but also because it keeps my synaptic connections green. For a while I was hoping this blog could morph into an aggregator and provide a home for “endangered” bloggers. I just haven’t figured out how to make that happen yet.
As we head further into 2010, I am forced to turn my attention to the future of this blog. In a short time we’ll go home. That decision has been in the works for some time. We have concluded that the time has come to exchange our long itinerant tour of the globe for a place of permanence that we can call our own. I need to be a tree and grow some roots some place. Soon we will pack out one last time, move to our new home, unpack, and get to know the neighbors. And, we’ll get acquainted with a city that we have visited many times before but never really lived in. The future will hold some challenges but hopefully, also a few more adventures.
In any case, as George Thorogood sings it — I need to “get a haircut and get a real job.” That nine to five scene most certainly will include a dress code (oh darn!), but will also pay the bills.

Still, in a world where the average life span of a blog is six months, I’d like to think that we are living our fourth life. I do not want Diplopundit to go dark, putuscinte but I may not have a lot of options unless I win the lottery, or find a sugar blog daddy. Teh-heh! Neither is in great danger of happening, of course.

If you can think of a possible lifeline for this blog, I’d love to hear your thoughts. All comments and suggestions are welcomed. Private correspondence may be sent here or here. In the meantime, I’ll continue blogging until logistics or reality hit the fan. Grazie! Gracias por todo!
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Da Devil Doesn’t Like to Look Bad, Pat

Satan, from Gustave Doré's illustrations for P...

NDS asked “is commentary even necessary?” He was, of course, referring to the Pat, and the Rush shows. You know … Pat’s thing about that deal with the devil ….see the twin videos here.

Now – what do you know? It turns out da Devil does not like to look bad; and writes a letter to a paper in Minneapolis:
Dear Pat Robertson,
I know that you know that all press is good press, so I appreciate the shout-out. And you make God look like a big mean bully who kicks people when they are down, so I’m all over that action.
But when you say that Haiti has made a pact with me, it is totally humiliating. I may be evil incarnate, but I’m no welcher. The way you put it, making a deal with me leaves folks desperate and impoverished.
Sure, in the afterlife, but when I strike bargains with people, they first get something here on earth — glamour, beauty, talent, wealth, fame, glory, a golden fiddle. Those Haitians have nothing, and I mean nothing. And that was before the earthquake. Haven’t you seen “Crossroads”? Or “Damn Yankees”?
If I had a thing going with Haiti, there’d be lots of banks, skyscrapers, SUVs, exclusive night clubs, Botox — that kind of thing. An 80 percent poverty rate is so not my style. Nothing against it — I’m just saying: Not how I roll.
You’re doing great work, Pat, and I don’t want to clip your wings — just, come on, you’re making me look bad. And not the good kind of bad. Keep blaming God. That’s working. But leave me out of it, please. Or we may need to renegotiate your own contract.
Best,
Satan setan
(LILY COYLE, MINNEAPOLIS| Star Tribune)

DHS Announces Humanitarian Parole for Orphaned Children from Haiti

On January 18, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Janet Napolitano, in coordination with the U.S. Department of State, announced a humanitarian parole policy allowing orphaned children from Haiti to enter the United States temporarily on an individual basis to ensure that they receive the care they need—as part of the U.S. government’s ongoing support of international recovery efforts after last week’s earthquake.  Excerpt: 

Humanitarian parole into the United States may be granted by the Secretary of Homeland Security to bring otherwise inadmissible individuals into the country on account of urgent humanitarian reasons or other emergencies. The humanitarian parole policy announced by Secretary Napolitano today will be applied on a case-by-case basis to the following children:
  • Children who have been legally confirmed as orphans eligible for intercountry adoption by the Government of Haiti and are being adopted by U.S. citizens. 
  • Children who have been previously identified by an adoption service provider or facilitator as eligible for intercountry adoption and have been matched to U.S. citizen prospective adoptive parents.
Under applicable laws, unaccompanied minors entering the country without a parent or legal guardian are subject to special procedures regarding their custody and care. DHS coordinates with the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Refugee Resettlement on the cases of these unaccompanied minors.
More information about humanitarian parole and TPS is available at http://www.uscis.gov/ or by calling USCIS toll-free at (800) 375-5283. DHS encourages U.S. citizens with pending adoption cases in Haiti to send us detailed information about their cases to HaitianAdoptions@dhs.gov.
Read the whole thing here.

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