Quickie: A Note on Blogging

Knowledge, mural by Robert Lewis Reid
from wikimedia commons

TH of The Hegemonist faces some tough decisions on blogging and Digger over at Life After Jerusalem has some related thoughts.

Here is something from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) that might be useful reading at the moment:

Blogs are like personal telephone calls crossed with newspapers. They’re the perfect tool for sharing your favorite chocolate mousse recipe with friends–or for upholding the basic tenets of democracy by letting the public know that a corrupt government official has been paying off your boss.

If you blog, there are no guarantees you’ll attract a readership of thousands. But at least a few readers will find your blog, and they may be the people you’d least want or expect. These include potential or current employers, coworkers, and professional colleagues; your neighbors; your spouse or partner; your family; and anyone else curious enough to type your name, email address or screen name into Google or Feedster and click a few links.

Continue reading How to Blog Safely (About Work or Anything Else). More on blogging along this line later.

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Quickie: A Note on Blogging

Knowledge, mural by Robert Lewis Reid
from wikimedia commons

TH of The Hegemonist faces some tough decisions on blogging and Digger over at Life After Jerusalem has some related thoughts.

Here is something from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) that might be useful reading at the moment:

Blogs are like personal telephone calls crossed with newspapers. They’re the perfect tool for sharing your favorite chocolate mousse recipe with friends–or for upholding the basic tenets of democracy by letting the public know that a corrupt government official has been paying off your boss.

If you blog, there are no guarantees you’ll attract a readership of thousands. But at least a few readers will find your blog, and they may be the people you’d least want or expect. These include potential or current employers, coworkers, and professional colleagues; your neighbors; your spouse or partner; your family; and anyone else curious enough to type your name, email address or screen name into Google or Feedster and click a few links.

Continue reading How to Blog Safely (About Work or Anything Else). More on blogging along this line later.

USAID Local Employees Arrested in Zimbabwe

Air Force Commander Air Marshal Perence Shiri (middle)
Photo from newzimbabwe.com

As best as I could trace this ridiculous story, it started in mid December when newzimbabwe.com reported that Zimbabwe’s Air Force Commander Air Marshal Perence Shiri survived an attempt on his life. This is the same Perence Shiri who according to reports was the commander of the North Koeran-trained 5 Brigade army unit which was deployed in the Matabeleland and Midlands regions in 1982 to hunt down alleged dissidents. At the end of its activities, in 1986, human rights groups say 20 000 civilians were dead, thousands more missing and others displaced.

Shiri was reportedly hospitalised after suffering a gunshot wound to his arm, a senior official from Zimbabwe’s ruling Zanu PF party told the website. Shiri, driving alone in his official car, is said to have been leaving his farm in Mashonaland West Province on Saturday night when he was ambushed. “He came under fire from a sizeable number of professional hitmen. He survived the attack, although he was shot on the arm,” the official said, speaking on condition he is not named.

Zimbabwe’s Home Affairs Minister Kembo Mohadi said the attack on Shiri, who was alone at the time, appeared to be “a build-up of terror attacks targeting high-profile persons, government officials, government establishments and public transport systems”. Mohadi also said the attack on Shiri, 53, “showed the assailants were well trained and there was a clear attempt to destabilise the country through acts of terrorism”.

Mohaid’s pronouncements is kind of like the equivalent of the red/severe level in DHS’s homeland security threat advisory, only more cranky. One for the Huh? News, you think?

Let’s see — a top military official was driving alone (It’s Africa people, what happened to military escorts and aides?), he came under attack by “professional hitmen,” (I wonder if they’re the Fargo kind) and he was hit on the arm (or the palm of his hand in some other reports; apparently they’re “well trained”).

Borat could do a better job with this material if only Zim has not gone bat crazy.

On January 22, Frank Muchirahondo, a driver for USAID was arrested accused of shooting Air Force Commander Perence Shiri; Muchirahondo is facing attempted murder charges. Another USAID employee Daniel Mlenga, has apparently also been arrested.

Muchirahondo’s lawyer Chris Mhike of Atherstone and Cook said bail was denied and his client’s application could not be heard and that the matter was postponed until February 24.

The US embassy has reportedly issued a statement condemning Muchirahondo’s arrest and dismissing all allegations against the employee saying he was among other employees doing humanitarian work for the organisation at the time of the shooting. I could not locate any statement in state.gov or Embassy Harare’s website. If you have a link to the official statement, please let me know.

In the meantime, the Zimbabwe Human Rights NGO Forum (the Forum) has released a statement: The Zimbabwe Human Rights NGO is deeply concerned and condemns the failure by the political parties to ensure the release of Jestina Mukoko, the Director of the Zimbabwe Peace Project, Frank Muchirahondo and Daniel Mlenga, both USAID employees, and many other prisoners of conscience from Chikurubi Prison and other places of detention. We strongly believe that they are being held on frivolous, trumped-up political charges, which have no substance at law. Further, it is becoming increasingly evident that political prisoners were used as mere pawns by the political protagonists for political leverage.

Robert “Zimbabwe is mine” Mugabe must be getting his state of play from the Marcos playbook. When Ferdinand Marcos was in power, General Fabian Ver, his cousin, was the Philippines AFP Chief of Staff and his most trusted general (later implicated in the assassination of Benigno Aquino). Gen. Perence Shiri is as well, a cousin of Robert Mugabe and has been named the prime mover over the military’s ugly fight over the diamond fields in eastern Zimbabwe.

Power, money and perpetual rule – they can eat raw at a man’s soul and before long, nothing exist but an abject cast of a man lost for all eternity.

Lost, er unless, they put you in a refrigerated crypt like this one, or in trading cards like this one.


USAID Local Employees Arrested in Zimbabwe

Air Force Commander Air Marshal Perence Shiri (middle)
Photo from newzimbabwe.com

As best as I could trace this ridiculous story, it started in mid December when newzimbabwe.com reported that Zimbabwe’s Air Force Commander Air Marshal Perence Shiri survived an attempt on his life. This is the same Perence Shiri who according to reports was the commander of the North Koeran-trained 5 Brigade army unit which was deployed in the Matabeleland and Midlands regions in 1982 to hunt down alleged dissidents. At the end of its activities, in 1986, human rights groups say 20 000 civilians were dead, thousands more missing and others displaced.

Shiri was reportedly hospitalised after suffering a gunshot wound to his arm, a senior official from Zimbabwe’s ruling Zanu PF party told the website. Shiri, driving alone in his official car, is said to have been leaving his farm in Mashonaland West Province on Saturday night when he was ambushed. “He came under fire from a sizeable number of professional hitmen. He survived the attack, although he was shot on the arm,” the official said, speaking on condition he is not named.

Zimbabwe’s Home Affairs Minister Kembo Mohadi said the attack on Shiri, who was alone at the time, appeared to be “a build-up of terror attacks targeting high-profile persons, government officials, government establishments and public transport systems”. Mohadi also said the attack on Shiri, 53, “showed the assailants were well trained and there was a clear attempt to destabilise the country through acts of terrorism”.

Mohaid’s pronouncements is kind of like the equivalent of the red/severe level in DHS’s homeland security threat advisory, only more cranky. One for the Huh? News, you think?

Let’s see — a top military official was driving alone (It’s Africa people, what happened to military escorts and aides?), he came under attack by “professional hitmen,” (I wonder if they’re the Fargo kind) and he was hit on the arm (or the palm of his hand in some other reports; apparently they’re “well trained”).

Borat could do a better job with this material if only Zim has not gone bat crazy.

On January 22, Frank Muchirahondo, a driver for USAID was arrested accused of shooting Air Force Commander Perence Shiri; Muchirahondo is facing attempted murder charges. Another USAID employee Daniel Mlenga, has apparently also been arrested.

Muchirahondo’s lawyer Chris Mhike of Atherstone and Cook said bail was denied and his client’s application could not be heard and that the matter was postponed until February 24.

The US embassy has reportedly issued a statement condemning Muchirahondo’s arrest and dismissing all allegations against the employee saying he was among other employees doing humanitarian work for the organisation at the time of the shooting. I could not locate any statement in state.gov or Embassy Harare’s website. If you have a link to the official statement, please let me know.

In the meantime, the Zimbabwe Human Rights NGO Forum (the Forum) has released a statement: The Zimbabwe Human Rights NGO is deeply concerned and condemns the failure by the political parties to ensure the release of Jestina Mukoko, the Director of the Zimbabwe Peace Project, Frank Muchirahondo and Daniel Mlenga, both USAID employees, and many other prisoners of conscience from Chikurubi Prison and other places of detention. We strongly believe that they are being held on frivolous, trumped-up political charges, which have no substance at law. Further, it is becoming increasingly evident that political prisoners were used as mere pawns by the political protagonists for political leverage.

Robert “Zimbabwe is mine” Mugabe must be getting his state of play from the Marcos playbook. When Ferdinand Marcos was in power, General Fabian Ver, his cousin, was the Philippines AFP Chief of Staff and his most trusted general (later implicated in the assassination of Benigno Aquino). Gen. Perence Shiri is as well, a cousin of Robert Mugabe and has been named the prime mover over the military’s ugly fight over the diamond fields in eastern Zimbabwe.

Power, money and perpetual rule – they can eat raw at a man’s soul and before long, nothing exist but an abject cast of a man lost for all eternity.

Lost, er unless, they put you in a refrigerated crypt like this one, or in trading cards like this one.


Officially In: Bosworth and Ross

After a few weeks of rumors, Ambassador Stephen Bosworth is officially the State Department’s Special Representative for North Korea Policy. The announcement below is dated February 20:

I have appointed Ambassador Stephen W. Bosworth as Special Representative for North Korea Policy. Ambassador Bosworth will be our senior official handling North Korea issues, reporting to the Secretary of State, as well as to the President.

I have asked Ambassador Bosworth to oversee U.S. efforts in the Six-Party Talks to achieve the verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in a peaceful manner. He will serve as our senior emissary for U.S. engagement with North Korea, in close consultation with our allies and partners.

Ambassador Bosworth’s experience both in government and in the private sector makes him an ideal candidate for this task. He served as United States Ambassador to the Republic of Korea from 1997 to 2000. He was Executive Director of the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization from 1995 to 1997 and previously served as Ambassador to Tunisia and the Philippines. He has visited North Korea several times and currently serves as Dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

Obviously, this was a tad confusing to some in the press. When queried about the difference between the Special Representative and career diplomat, Ambassador Sung Kim’s position as U.S. Special Envoy to the Six-Party Talks, the Acting Deputy Spokesman had this to say:

A special envoy, in diplomatic parlance, has the authority to negotiate. A special representative, in this particular case, as well as in Ambassador Holbrooke’s case, is an authority who coordinates across the board for the United States. So Sung Kim will remain our Special Envoy and he will handle the day-to-day contact and discussions with our Six-Party colleagues. And Ambassador Bosworth will be the special representative coordinating the overall U.S. Government effort.

~ ~ ~

Okay, after the longest rumor-run, finally ta-da – the Acting Department Spokesman announced yesterday the appointment of Dennis Ross as Special Advisor for The Gulf and Southwest Asia. The announcement dated February 23 is below:

The Secretary is pleased to announce the appointment of Dennis B. Ross to the position of Special Advisor to the Secretary of State for The Gulf and Southwest Asia. This is a region in which America is fighting two wars and facing challenges of ongoing conflict, terror, proliferation, access to energy, economic development and strengthening democracy and the rule of law. In this area, we must strive to build support for U.S. goals and policies. To be successful, we will need to be able to integrate our policy development and implementation across a broad range of offices and senior officials in the State Department, and, in his role as Special Advisor to the Secretary, Ambassador Ross will be asked to play that role.

Specifically, as Special Advisor, he will provide to the Secretary and senior State Department officials strategic advice and perspective on the region; offer assessments and also act to ensure effective policy integration throughout the region; coordinate with senior officials in the development and formulation of new policy approaches; and participate, at the request of the Secretary, in inter-agency activities related to the region.

Ambassador Ross brings a wealth of experience not just to issues within the region but also to larger political-military challenges that flow from the area and have an impact outside of the Gulf and Southwest Asia, and the Secretary looks forward to drawing on that experience and diplomatic perspective.

Speculations about Ambassador Ross’ new title is ripe and kicking around the blogosphere already. Check out this one and this one.


Update: 2:00 pm

More than a few commentators have pointed out the glaring absence of the mention of Iran as part of this portfolio. But given Ambassador’s perspective about engagement with Iran, you and I probably won’t really hear anything about it until they’re good and ready (if it is part of this portfolio, that is). In 2008 during his official testimony at the Senate, Ambassador Ross recommended a direct, secret back channel to set up engagement with the Iranians, but cautioned that any such channel should engage Ali Khamenei, the Supreme Leader.

Intractable problems these are, for both Ambassadors Bosworth and Ross. Fingers crossed for when diplomacy works, and good wishes.


Related Items:

Officially In: Bosworth and Ross

After a few weeks of rumors, Ambassador Stephen Bosworth is officially the State Department’s Special Representative for North Korea Policy. The announcement below is dated February 20:

I have appointed Ambassador Stephen W. Bosworth as Special Representative for North Korea Policy. Ambassador Bosworth will be our senior official handling North Korea issues, reporting to the Secretary of State, as well as to the President.

I have asked Ambassador Bosworth to oversee U.S. efforts in the Six-Party Talks to achieve the verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in a peaceful manner. He will serve as our senior emissary for U.S. engagement with North Korea, in close consultation with our allies and partners.

Ambassador Bosworth’s experience both in government and in the private sector makes him an ideal candidate for this task. He served as United States Ambassador to the Republic of Korea from 1997 to 2000. He was Executive Director of the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization from 1995 to 1997 and previously served as Ambassador to Tunisia and the Philippines. He has visited North Korea several times and currently serves as Dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

Obviously, this was a tad confusing to some in the press. When queried about the difference between the Special Representative and career diplomat, Ambassador Sung Kim’s position as U.S. Special Envoy to the Six-Party Talks, the Acting Deputy Spokesman had this to say:

A special envoy, in diplomatic parlance, has the authority to negotiate. A special representative, in this particular case, as well as in Ambassador Holbrooke’s case, is an authority who coordinates across the board for the United States. So Sung Kim will remain our Special Envoy and he will handle the day-to-day contact and discussions with our Six-Party colleagues. And Ambassador Bosworth will be the special representative coordinating the overall U.S. Government effort.

~ ~ ~

Okay, after the longest rumor-run, finally ta-da – the Acting Department Spokesman announced yesterday the appointment of Dennis Ross as Special Advisor for The Gulf and Southwest Asia. The announcement dated February 23 is below:

The Secretary is pleased to announce the appointment of Dennis B. Ross to the position of Special Advisor to the Secretary of State for The Gulf and Southwest Asia. This is a region in which America is fighting two wars and facing challenges of ongoing conflict, terror, proliferation, access to energy, economic development and strengthening democracy and the rule of law. In this area, we must strive to build support for U.S. goals and policies. To be successful, we will need to be able to integrate our policy development and implementation across a broad range of offices and senior officials in the State Department, and, in his role as Special Advisor to the Secretary, Ambassador Ross will be asked to play that role.

Specifically, as Special Advisor, he will provide to the Secretary and senior State Department officials strategic advice and perspective on the region; offer assessments and also act to ensure effective policy integration throughout the region; coordinate with senior officials in the development and formulation of new policy approaches; and participate, at the request of the Secretary, in inter-agency activities related to the region.

Ambassador Ross brings a wealth of experience not just to issues within the region but also to larger political-military challenges that flow from the area and have an impact outside of the Gulf and Southwest Asia, and the Secretary looks forward to drawing on that experience and diplomatic perspective.

Speculations about Ambassador Ross’ new title is ripe and kicking around the blogosphere already. Check out this one and this one.


Update: 2:00 pm

More than a few commentators have pointed out the glaring absence of the mention of Iran as part of this portfolio. But given Ambassador’s perspective about engagement with Iran, you and I probably won’t really hear anything about it until they’re good and ready (if it is part of this portfolio, that is). In 2008 during his official testimony at the Senate, Ambassador Ross recommended a direct, secret back channel to set up engagement with the Iranians, but cautioned that any such channel should engage Ali Khamenei, the Supreme Leader.

Intractable problems these are, for both Ambassadors Bosworth and Ross. Fingers crossed for when diplomacy works, and good wishes.


Related Items:

2008 Foreign Service Nationals of the Year

U.S. diplomatic missions overseas often hire local employees (called FSNs for Foreign Service Nationals, or LES for Locally Employed Staff) to perform non-sensitive administrative functions. Their jobs can range from low-level menial positions, such as switchboard operators, drivers, electricians and clerks to jobs with more substantial responsibilities like political assistants, economic specialists, trade assistants, visa supervisors and others. Smaller U.S. missions may be supported by half a dozen FSNs while large embassies can employ hundreds of them.

LE Staff constitute the largest category of Department of State employees. There are approximately 38,000 LE staff worldwide, plus thousands more LE staff for other federal agencies like USDA, DHS, DOJ, DOC and others. They are sometimes referred to as the backbone of the Foreign Service, as they keep U.S. missions around the world running smoothly, despite the regular turnover of American officers and specialists.

Every year around November, the State Department honors FSNs from the six regional bureaus, and selects an FSN of the year. The 2008 winners were selected from among 80 nominees by a panel of bureau directors but publication of winners is often delayed by a couple of months. You can read more about the top awardees in the February issue of the State magazine (pp20-23). Below are the FSNs honored.


Europe (EUR) and FSN of the Year-
Inesa Nicolaescu

Inesa Nicolaescu, the trafficking-in-persons program manager at the U.S. Embassy in Chiçin˘au, Moldova, is the 2008 Foreign Service National of the Year. Nominated by the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, she was cited for “extraordinary accomplishments toward international anti-human-trafficking law enforcement and child sexual exploitation prosecutions.”


East Asia Pacific (EAP )-
Voltaire T. Gomez

Voltaire T. Gomez, an investigator in the regional security office of the U.S. Embassy in Manila, is the FSN of the Year for the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs. He was cited for helping the embassy defeat terrorism and foster peace by “providing a secure platform to operate in some of the most precarious regions of the Philippines.”


Africa (AF)-
Fiona Frances Hamid

Fiona Frances Hamid, a registered nurse at the U.S. Embassy in Khartoum, Sudan, is the FSN of the Year for the Bureau of African Affairs. She was cited for “serving dual roles as the embassy nurse and community liaison officer, and single-handedly providing community health services ranging from screening reimbursable medicines to aiding mission victims of a terrorist attack.” She responded to a fatal terrorist attack on two embassy employees on New Year’s Day 2008, giving her own blood and assisting the hospital’s trauma team. She knew the victims well, she said, since they were part of the “small, close family” that is the embassy.


Near East Asia (NEA)-
Abderrahman Moussaid

Abderrahman Moussaid, senior FSN supervisor and investigator at the U.S. Consulate General in Casablanca, Morocco, is the FSN of the Year for the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs. He was cited for “on-the-spot assistance while under great personal risk to ensure the mission’s safety and security during a suicide bombing attack.”


Western Hemisphere (WHA)-
Jean Hans LaForet

Jean Hans LaForet, warehouse and property supervisor at the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, is the FSN of the Year for the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs. He was cited for directing the move to the post’s new embassy compound “in an environment marked by the country’s worse civil unrest in four years.”


South Central Asia (SCA) –
Rubayat Rahman

Rubayat Rahman, an FSN investigator at the U.S. Embassy in Dhaka, is the FSN of the Year for the Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs. He was cited for his “commitment to promote security and deny terrorism in Mission Bangladesh, as well as heroism in the face of tremendous personal risk.” In July 2007, Rubayat was in a residence with an American embassy employee who lit a cigarette, leading to a gas explosion and fire. “I fell on the ground,” he said. “I heard her screaming and saw her hair and clothes were on fire.” He smothered the flames with his hands, used his cell phone to report the fire and then carried her out of the building. He reentered the apartment, located a fire extinguisher and attempted to put out the fire. Burned over 22 percent of his body, he was hospitalized for three months. He is still undergoing skin grafts, physical therapy and surgeries. He wears long gloves that cover his hands and arms and “probably will wear them the rest of my life,” he said. He said he doesn’t think he’ll ever be physically 100 percent, but “my heart is still 100 percent.”

Congratulations!

2008 Foreign Service Nationals of the Year

U.S. diplomatic missions overseas often hire local employees (called FSNs for Foreign Service Nationals, or LES for Locally Employed Staff) to perform non-sensitive administrative functions. Their jobs can range from low-level menial positions, such as switchboard operators, drivers, electricians and clerks to jobs with more substantial responsibilities like political assistants, economic specialists, trade assistants, visa supervisors and others. Smaller U.S. missions may be supported by half a dozen FSNs while large embassies can employ hundreds of them.

LE Staff constitute the largest category of Department of State employees. There are approximately 38,000 LE staff worldwide, plus thousands more LE staff for other federal agencies like USDA, DHS, DOJ, DOC and others. They are sometimes referred to as the backbone of the Foreign Service, as they keep U.S. missions around the world running smoothly, despite the regular turnover of American officers and specialists.

Every year around November, the State Department honors FSNs from the six regional bureaus, and selects an FSN of the year. The 2008 winners were selected from among 80 nominees by a panel of bureau directors but publication of winners is often delayed by a couple of months. You can read more about the top awardees in the February issue of the State magazine (pp20-23). Below are the FSNs honored.


Europe (EUR) and FSN of the Year-
Inesa Nicolaescu

Inesa Nicolaescu, the trafficking-in-persons program manager at the U.S. Embassy in Chiçin˘au, Moldova, is the 2008 Foreign Service National of the Year. Nominated by the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, she was cited for “extraordinary accomplishments toward international anti-human-trafficking law enforcement and child sexual exploitation prosecutions.”


East Asia Pacific (EAP )-
Voltaire T. Gomez

Voltaire T. Gomez, an investigator in the regional security office of the U.S. Embassy in Manila, is the FSN of the Year for the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs. He was cited for helping the embassy defeat terrorism and foster peace by “providing a secure platform to operate in some of the most precarious regions of the Philippines.”


Africa (AF)-
Fiona Frances Hamid

Fiona Frances Hamid, a registered nurse at the U.S. Embassy in Khartoum, Sudan, is the FSN of the Year for the Bureau of African Affairs. She was cited for “serving dual roles as the embassy nurse and community liaison officer, and single-handedly providing community health services ranging from screening reimbursable medicines to aiding mission victims of a terrorist attack.” She responded to a fatal terrorist attack on two embassy employees on New Year’s Day 2008, giving her own blood and assisting the hospital’s trauma team. She knew the victims well, she said, since they were part of the “small, close family” that is the embassy.


Near East Asia (NEA)-
Abderrahman Moussaid

Abderrahman Moussaid, senior FSN supervisor and investigator at the U.S. Consulate General in Casablanca, Morocco, is the FSN of the Year for the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs. He was cited for “on-the-spot assistance while under great personal risk to ensure the mission’s safety and security during a suicide bombing attack.”


Western Hemisphere (WHA)-
Jean Hans LaForet

Jean Hans LaForet, warehouse and property supervisor at the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, is the FSN of the Year for the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs. He was cited for directing the move to the post’s new embassy compound “in an environment marked by the country’s worse civil unrest in four years.”


South Central Asia (SCA) –
Rubayat Rahman

Rubayat Rahman, an FSN investigator at the U.S. Embassy in Dhaka, is the FSN of the Year for the Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs. He was cited for his “commitment to promote security and deny terrorism in Mission Bangladesh, as well as heroism in the face of tremendous personal risk.” In July 2007, Rubayat was in a residence with an American embassy employee who lit a cigarette, leading to a gas explosion and fire. “I fell on the ground,” he said. “I heard her screaming and saw her hair and clothes were on fire.” He smothered the flames with his hands, used his cell phone to report the fire and then carried her out of the building. He reentered the apartment, located a fire extinguisher and attempted to put out the fire. Burned over 22 percent of his body, he was hospitalized for three months. He is still undergoing skin grafts, physical therapy and surgeries. He wears long gloves that cover his hands and arms and “probably will wear them the rest of my life,” he said. He said he doesn’t think he’ll ever be physically 100 percent, but “my heart is still 100 percent.”

Congratulations!