Diplopundit’s Blog Index for February 2009

It is not always easy to hunt down older posts in Blogger. So I am starting a monthly index of blog posts. If you can’t find the materials in the “tag cloud” in the right-most column here, you can always scroll through the monthly index of postings. I hope this is helpful.

Officially In: Chris Hill to Baghdad

Video of the Week: Special Victims (of Exclusion) Unit

Former Spokesman McCormack Moves On, To Boeing

BlogNotes: Moving to Google Feedburner

Diplomatic Bloggers: Official Blogs, Art Thou Here to Stay

Hall of Shame: Song for the Traveling Bribery Men

Insider Quote: The Leadership Gap Where?

Diplomatic Bloggers: Web 2.0 Door Opens

Insider Quote: Our old friend Negotiation

Foreign Service Overseas Pay Equity Act of 2009

Quickie: A Note on Blogging

USAID Local Employees Arrested in Zimbabwe

Officially In: Bosworth and Ross

2008 Foreign Service Nationals of the Year

Travels with Hillary

February 27: AFSA Dissent Awards Deadline

Video of the Week: What Leads to Success

What’s Going to Happen to USAID? Jack Lew?

Wanted: Patron Saint for Dissenting Diplomats

Hillary on Holbrooke’s Role in AfPak

Hillary is blogging …

Insider Quote: The Great Board Mystery Game

Weapons Accountability in Afghanistan

Military Robots: Life Imitating Sci-Fi

A Diplomatic Surge? What’s the Campaign Plan?

US Embassy Baghdad: Super Embassaurus

Video of the Week: Papergirl’s Love Poem

Hillary at the Asia Society: We Are Ready to Liste…

Remembering Our Man in Afghanistan, 1979

The FRUS Fracas, End Game is Near?

Bosworth – The New Six-Party Talks Guy?

Happy Darwin Day!

CRS Reports on WikiLeaks Now

Shock and Awe: The Zimbabwe Edition

Insider Quote: What Diplomacy Is All About

Our Inheritance: Bush’s True Legacy

“Pieces of Equipment” Out of Iraq

Richard Holbrooke: Our AfPak Man and Diplomatic H-…

Quickie: Secret Trip, No Twits Allowed

Video of the Week: Kiteflyer’s Hill

The Embassy Hired Him When He Was 12?

27,000 for PR – Who’s Driving This Thing?

One of Ours is Dead in Addis Ababa

“King of Kings” Threw a Tantrum

In Zimbabwe, Darkly

HRC’s Swearing-in Ceremony at Foggy Bottom

Hard Lessons: USAID, Pushed to the Limit

Quickie: AFSA Opinion Poll Results

That “Reply-To-All” Crisis: Could Have Been Worse

Commission on Wartime Contracting Holds First Hear…

Dragging Foggy Bottom to Court

Insider Quote: Fixated on Iraq

Quickie: A New Ambassador to Kabul?

Video of the Week: Jamais Cascio on Building a Bet…


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Diplopundit’s Blog Index for February 2009

It is not always easy to hunt down older posts in Blogger. So I am starting a monthly index of blog posts. If you can’t find the materials in the “tag cloud” in the right-most column here, you can always scroll through the monthly index of postings. I hope this is helpful.

Officially In: Chris Hill to Baghdad

Video of the Week: Special Victims (of Exclusion) Unit

Former Spokesman McCormack Moves On, To Boeing

BlogNotes: Moving to Google Feedburner

Diplomatic Bloggers: Official Blogs, Art Thou Here to Stay

Hall of Shame: Song for the Traveling Bribery Men

Insider Quote: The Leadership Gap Where?

Diplomatic Bloggers: Web 2.0 Door Opens

Insider Quote: Our old friend Negotiation

Foreign Service Overseas Pay Equity Act of 2009

Quickie: A Note on Blogging

USAID Local Employees Arrested in Zimbabwe

Officially In: Bosworth and Ross

2008 Foreign Service Nationals of the Year

Travels with Hillary

February 27: AFSA Dissent Awards Deadline

Video of the Week: What Leads to Success

What’s Going to Happen to USAID? Jack Lew?

Wanted: Patron Saint for Dissenting Diplomats

Hillary on Holbrooke’s Role in AfPak

Hillary is blogging …

Insider Quote: The Great Board Mystery Game

Weapons Accountability in Afghanistan

Military Robots: Life Imitating Sci-Fi

A Diplomatic Surge? What’s the Campaign Plan?

US Embassy Baghdad: Super Embassaurus

Video of the Week: Papergirl’s Love Poem

Hillary at the Asia Society: We Are Ready to Liste…

Remembering Our Man in Afghanistan, 1979

The FRUS Fracas, End Game is Near?

Bosworth – The New Six-Party Talks Guy?

Happy Darwin Day!

CRS Reports on WikiLeaks Now

Shock and Awe: The Zimbabwe Edition

Insider Quote: What Diplomacy Is All About

Our Inheritance: Bush’s True Legacy

“Pieces of Equipment” Out of Iraq

Richard Holbrooke: Our AfPak Man and Diplomatic H-…

Quickie: Secret Trip, No Twits Allowed

Video of the Week: Kiteflyer’s Hill

The Embassy Hired Him When He Was 12?

27,000 for PR – Who’s Driving This Thing?

One of Ours is Dead in Addis Ababa

“King of Kings” Threw a Tantrum

In Zimbabwe, Darkly

HRC’s Swearing-in Ceremony at Foggy Bottom

Hard Lessons: USAID, Pushed to the Limit

Quickie: AFSA Opinion Poll Results

That “Reply-To-All” Crisis: Could Have Been Worse

Commission on Wartime Contracting Holds First Hear…

Dragging Foggy Bottom to Court

Insider Quote: Fixated on Iraq

Quickie: A New Ambassador to Kabul?

Video of the Week: Jamais Cascio on Building a Bet…


Officially In: Chris Hill to Baghdad

I have not seen an official announcement at State but it can’t get more official than this. President Obama was at Camp Leujune yesterday and gave a speech on responsibly ending the war in Iraq. Towards the second half of his speech when he talked about how the drawdown of our military should send a clear signal that Iraq’s future is now its own responsibility, he also said this:

“This effort will be led by our new Ambassador to Iraq – Chris Hill. From his time in the Peace Corps, to his work in Kosovo and Korea, Ambassador Hill has been tested, and he has shown the pragmatism and skill that we need right now. He will be supported by the courageous and capable work of so many American diplomats and aid workers who are serving in Iraq.”

A few more excerpts below. Read the full text of the speech as prepared for delivery here.

[…]

I also want to take this opportunity to acknowledge Ryan Crocker, who recently completed his service as our Ambassador to Iraq. Throughout his career, Ryan always took on the toughest assignments. He is an example of the very best that this nation has to offer, and we owe him a great debt of gratitude. He carried on his work with an extraordinary degree of cooperation with two of our finest Generals – General David Petraeus, and General Ray Odierno – who will be critical in carrying forward the strategy that I will outline today.

[…]

What we will not do is let the pursuit of the perfect stand in the way of achievable goals. We cannot rid Iraq of all who oppose America or sympathize with our adversaries. We cannot police Iraq’s streets until they are completely safe, nor stay until Iraq’s union is perfected. We cannot sustain indefinitely a commitment that has put a strain on our military, and will cost the American people nearly a trillion dollars. America’s men and women in uniform have fought block by block, province by province, year after year, to give the Iraqis this chance to choose a better future. Now, we must ask the Iraqi people to seize it.

[…]

Let me say this as plainly as I can: by August 31, 2010, our combat mission in Iraq will end.

[…]

The drawdown of our military should send a clear signal that Iraq’s future is now its own responsibility. The long-term success of the Iraqi nation will depend upon decisions made by Iraq’s leaders and the fortitude of the Iraqi people. Iraq is a sovereign country with legitimate institutions; America cannot – and should not – take their place. However, a strong political, diplomatic, and civilian effort on our part can advance progress and help lay a foundation for lasting peace and security.

[…]

So to the Iraqi people, let me be clear about America’s intentions. The United States pursues no claim on your territory or your resources. We respect your sovereignty and the tremendous sacrifices you have made for your country. We seek a full transition to Iraqi responsibility for the security of your country. And going forward, we can build a lasting relationship founded upon mutual interests and mutual respect as Iraq takes its rightful place in the community of nations.

The President has always been an effective public speaker, but here he has demonstrated his gift in Aristotelian oratory with a strong emphasis on message content and an appeal to common sense.

If you have ambitions of becoming an ambassador, best study this and all the rest. For as Torquato Tasso says in 1582, “No one can be a perfect ambassador who is not at the same time a good orator.”

Officially In: Chris Hill to Baghdad

I have not seen an official announcement at State but it can’t get more official than this. President Obama was at Camp Leujune yesterday and gave a speech on responsibly ending the war in Iraq. Towards the second half of his speech when he talked about how the drawdown of our military should send a clear signal that Iraq’s future is now its own responsibility, he also said this:

“This effort will be led by our new Ambassador to Iraq – Chris Hill. From his time in the Peace Corps, to his work in Kosovo and Korea, Ambassador Hill has been tested, and he has shown the pragmatism and skill that we need right now. He will be supported by the courageous and capable work of so many American diplomats and aid workers who are serving in Iraq.”

A few more excerpts below. Read the full text of the speech as prepared for delivery here.

[…]

I also want to take this opportunity to acknowledge Ryan Crocker, who recently completed his service as our Ambassador to Iraq. Throughout his career, Ryan always took on the toughest assignments. He is an example of the very best that this nation has to offer, and we owe him a great debt of gratitude. He carried on his work with an extraordinary degree of cooperation with two of our finest Generals – General David Petraeus, and General Ray Odierno – who will be critical in carrying forward the strategy that I will outline today.

[…]

What we will not do is let the pursuit of the perfect stand in the way of achievable goals. We cannot rid Iraq of all who oppose America or sympathize with our adversaries. We cannot police Iraq’s streets until they are completely safe, nor stay until Iraq’s union is perfected. We cannot sustain indefinitely a commitment that has put a strain on our military, and will cost the American people nearly a trillion dollars. America’s men and women in uniform have fought block by block, province by province, year after year, to give the Iraqis this chance to choose a better future. Now, we must ask the Iraqi people to seize it.

[…]

Let me say this as plainly as I can: by August 31, 2010, our combat mission in Iraq will end.

[…]

The drawdown of our military should send a clear signal that Iraq’s future is now its own responsibility. The long-term success of the Iraqi nation will depend upon decisions made by Iraq’s leaders and the fortitude of the Iraqi people. Iraq is a sovereign country with legitimate institutions; America cannot – and should not – take their place. However, a strong political, diplomatic, and civilian effort on our part can advance progress and help lay a foundation for lasting peace and security.

[…]

So to the Iraqi people, let me be clear about America’s intentions. The United States pursues no claim on your territory or your resources. We respect your sovereignty and the tremendous sacrifices you have made for your country. We seek a full transition to Iraqi responsibility for the security of your country. And going forward, we can build a lasting relationship founded upon mutual interests and mutual respect as Iraq takes its rightful place in the community of nations.

The President has always been an effective public speaker, but here he has demonstrated his gift in Aristotelian oratory with a strong emphasis on message content and an appeal to common sense.

If you have ambitions of becoming an ambassador, best study this and all the rest. For as Torquato Tasso says in 1582, “No one can be a perfect ambassador who is not at the same time a good orator.”

Video of the Week: Special Victims (of Exclusion) Unit

The producers of this video note at the end that the actors’ scripts are based on real events:

“This is not meant to suggest that this kind of culture exists everywhere,” the producers state at the end. “But elements of this culture exist in many areas and are huge Barriers to Innovation and Inclusion.”

Video of the Week: Special Victims (of Exclusion) Unit

The producers of this video note at the end that the actors’ scripts are based on real events:

“This is not meant to suggest that this kind of culture exists everywhere,” the producers state at the end. “But elements of this culture exist in many areas and are huge Barriers to Innovation and Inclusion.”

Former Spokesman McCormack Moves On, To Boeing

Photo added on 2/28 – from DipNote

Sean McCormack, the former State Department Spokesman signed off yesterday with one last post in DipNote.

“Today will be my last day at State after nearly fourteen years in the Foreign Service, and what I am most proud of in that time is what we accomplished in this space beyond the bricks and mortar of Foggy Bottom. Now I’ll transition from helping guide DipNote and our other digital media efforts (as well as on occasion providing content) to being a reader, user, and commenter.”

Today, Friday, he showed up at his new gig as VP for communications in Boeing’s Washington office. If you were following his tweets, you would have seen the following updates:

 

  • Start Friday new job with Boeing as VP for communications in Washington office. Tomorrow is last day at State.
    10:01 AM Feb 25th from Tweetie
  • Good to see Secretary Clinton picking up on what we started in digital media at the State Department http://tinyurl.com/ahkxyc11:33 AM Feb 22nd from web
  • In final weeks at State. Still work digital media. Welcome your ideas how to improve and employ new apps/tech. Will on pass to my successor
    7:56 PM Feb 4th
    from Tweetie
  • Starting post-spokesman recovery. First step/remove toiletries from travel case. Must believe no longer on semi- permanent road trip.
    7:46 PM Feb 3rd
    from Tweetie

 

I don’t know what other gig he could have gotten in the career ladder if he stayed. Sean McCormack began his career in the Foreign Service in 1995 and initially served at the U.S. embassy in Ankara from 1996-1998. He went on detail assignment at the NSC and the WH. A mid-level officer when he was appointed as Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs in 2005, he was last promoted in 2007 to the rank of FS-01. Now he’s off to a new adventure.

Former Spokesman McCormack Moves On, To Boeing

Photo added on 2/28 – from DipNote

Sean McCormack, the former State Department Spokesman signed off yesterday with one last post in DipNote.

“Today will be my last day at State after nearly fourteen years in the Foreign Service, and what I am most proud of in that time is what we accomplished in this space beyond the bricks and mortar of Foggy Bottom. Now I’ll transition from helping guide DipNote and our other digital media efforts (as well as on occasion providing content) to being a reader, user, and commenter.”

Today, Friday, he showed up at his new gig as VP for communications in Boeing’s Washington office. If you were following his tweets, you would have seen the following updates:

 

  • Start Friday new job with Boeing as VP for communications in Washington office. Tomorrow is last day at State.
    10:01 AM Feb 25th from Tweetie
  • Good to see Secretary Clinton picking up on what we started in digital media at the State Department http://tinyurl.com/ahkxyc11:33 AM Feb 22nd from web
  • In final weeks at State. Still work digital media. Welcome your ideas how to improve and employ new apps/tech. Will on pass to my successor
    7:56 PM Feb 4th
    from Tweetie
  • Starting post-spokesman recovery. First step/remove toiletries from travel case. Must believe no longer on semi- permanent road trip.
    7:46 PM Feb 3rd
    from Tweetie

 

I don’t know what other gig he could have gotten in the career ladder if he stayed. Sean McCormack began his career in the Foreign Service in 1995 and initially served at the U.S. embassy in Ankara from 1996-1998. He went on detail assignment at the NSC and the WH. A mid-level officer when he was appointed as Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs in 2005, he was last promoted in 2007 to the rank of FS-01. Now he’s off to a new adventure.

 

BlogNotes: Moving to Google Feedburner

Just a quick note — apparently since Google’s acquisition of FeedBurner on June 1, 2007, they have been moving the FeedBurner application to Google hardware, software, and data centers. Feedburner publishers including Diplopundit have recently been asked to move their feeds from Feedburner to Google Feedburner.

There should not be a loss of service with the feeds during this transition process. All feeds.feedburner.com URLs will redirect readers to feeds hosted by Google. Readers will continue to receive Diplopundit feeds.

But if you do encounter troubles with receiving my feeds, please be patient. According to Google FeedBurger, everything should return to normal within 72 hours of the move.

BlogNotes: Moving to Google Feedburner

Just a quick note — apparently since Google’s acquisition of FeedBurner on June 1, 2007, they have been moving the FeedBurner application to Google hardware, software, and data centers. Feedburner publishers including Diplopundit have recently been asked to move their feeds from Feedburner to Google Feedburner.

There should not be a loss of service with the feeds during this transition process. All feeds.feedburner.com URLs will redirect readers to feeds hosted by Google. Readers will continue to receive Diplopundit feeds.

But if you do encounter troubles with receiving my feeds, please be patient. According to Google FeedBurger, everything should return to normal within 72 hours of the move.