Snapshot: Foreign Service Family Member Employment by Bureau and Geographic Distribution

Posted: 1:32 am EDT

 

Via state.gov/flo (updated as of November 2015)

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Snapshot: Number of “T” Visa Applications, FY2005-2014

Posted: 12:24 am EDT

 

Via DHS/OIG:

Congress passed the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act (VTVPA) of 2000 (Pub. L. 106-386). Among other provisions, the Act created the T nonimmigrant status (T visa) to provide temporary immigration benefits to foreign nationals and aliens who are victims of severe forms of trafficking in persons.  To be eligible for a T visa, victims must (a) be in the United States on account of trafficking; (b) face extreme hardship involving unusual and severe harm if removed; and (c) with two exceptions, comply with reasonable requests for assistance from law enforcement in the investigation or prosecution of the acts of trafficking.

USCIS data on trafficking victims were limited to foreign national victims who had applied for T or U nonimmigrant status. This included individuals who had entered the United States legally as visitors, temporary workers, or others without lawful status.8 According to USCIS data, fewer than 1,000 foreign national victims applied for T visas each year from 2005 to 2014. Figure 3 shows a steady increase in T visa applications for this timeframe. However, this number remains small in comparison with the estimated hundreds of thousands of human trafficking victims in the United States, and is far below the 5,000 T visas that Congress sets aside for human trafficking victims every year.

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As depicted in table 1, our analysis of USCIS data from October 1, 2005, through September 2, 2014, showed that 3 percent of T visa applicants were minors while 61 percent were between 30 and 49 years old. T visa applicants were evenly divided by marital status and almost equally divided in terms of gender. Further, 41 percent of T visa applicants were from three Asian countries. The Philippines had the highest number of applicants (20 percent), followed by Mexico with 16 percent. Most T visa applicants did not report the method by which they entered the United States, although 10 percent self- reported they had no lawful status at the time of application. While the information pertains only to those victims who applied for T visa status, it does shed some light on the characteristics of foreign national victims and their origins, and could be useful in identifying human trafficking activity.

 

Snapshot: @StateDept Processing Time for FOIA Requests From Albright to Kerry

Posted: 12:48 am EDT

 

Via State/OIG:

The Department has been particularly late in meeting FOIA’s timelines for requests involving the Office of the Secretary. Table 1, which is based on IPS data provided to OIG, shows the processing time for FOIA requests that were tasked to S/ES and involved the current and past four Secretaries of State. Only 14 of the 417 FOIA requests were completed within the statutory timeframe. Fifty-five of the requests took more than 500 days to process. The majority of the requests, 243 of 417, are still pending; several of these pending requests were received years ago. For example, 10 of the 23 pending requests relating to former Secretary of State Colin Powell are at least 5 years old.

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Snapshot: Classes of Nonimmigrants Issued Visas, FY2010-2014

Posted: 1:53 am EDT

 

via travel.state.gov

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Nonimmigrant visa application processing fees are tiered based on the visa category and are non-refundable whether the application is approved or refused. Note that the fee is for a “processing fee” and not an issuance fee (subject to reciprocity). Nonimmigrant visa applicants from certain countries/areas of authority may be required to pay a visa issuance fee after their application is approved. These fees are based on the principle of  reciprocity:  when a foreign government imposes fees on U.S. citizens for certain types of visas, the United States will impose a reciprocal fee on citizens of that country/area of authority for similar types of visas.

The visa processing fees range from “No Fee” for applicants for A, G, C-2, C-3, NATO, and diplomatic visas, to non-petition-based nonimmigrant visa (except E) at $160.00 and petition based visa categories at $190.00.

E  visas or Treaty Trader/Investor, Australian Professional Specialty category visa is currently $205.00

K visas for Fiancé(e) or Spouse of U.S. citizen category visa is $265.00

It looks like the most expensive is the L visa fraud prevention and detection fee – for visa applicant included in L blanket petition   where the principal applicant is charged $500.00.

In any case, if we just calculate the consular revenue from 6,276,997 visitor visa applicants in FY2014 at $160 per applicant, that’s $1,004,319,520 or real serious money.

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Snapshot: Top Fiancé(e) Visa Issuance Posts (By Country) — FY2014

Posted: 2:01 am EDT

 

We put together a list of top K visa issuance posts by country, and region extracted from the travel.state.gov data page.  Applicants in Asia includes visa applicants from Oceania and what would typically be Near East Asia, East Asia Pacific and South Central Asia.  Applicants that we would typically put under WHA are broken down into North and South America. It would be an improvement to Consular Affair’s annual statistics if they can break down issuances/refusals based on the State Department’s geographic bureaus. Right now, the visa numbers are broken down by region that do not remotely correspond to any of the department’s geographic division.

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Notes:  K-1, K-2: Immigration laws passed by Congress allow an alien fiance(e) of a U.S. citizen and his/her minor child under 21 years old (and unmarried) to be admitted to the United States for 90 days so that a marriage ceremony can take place in the United States. More here.

K-3, K-4: Immigration laws passed by Congress allow the alien spouse of a U.S. citizen and his or her minor children to be admitted to the United States as nonimmigrants while they are awaiting the adjudication of a Form I-130 Petition for Alien Relative. More here.

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Snapshot: State/OIG Reports Summarized in the Classified Annex to the Semiannual Report to the Congress, 4/1/2015–9/30/2015

Posted: 12:25 am EDT

 

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  • AUD-IT-15-42 |  Audit of the Information Security Program for Sensitive Compartmented Information Systems at the Department of State (9/2015) (PDF – 1 page)
  • AUD-SI-15-37 | Audit of the Department of State Implementation of the Vital Presence Validation Process (8/2015) (PDF– 1 page)
  • MA-15-02 | Management Alert: Evacuation of Embassy Tripoli (7/2015) (PDF – 1 page unclassified summary)
  • AUD-CGI-15-38 | Management Assistance Report: Residential Security Concerns at U.S. Embassy Ankara, Turkey  (7/2015) (PDF– 1 page)
  • AUD-CGI-15-31 | Audit of the Construction Contract Award and Security Evaluation of the New Embassy Compound London (7/2015) (PDF – 49 pages)
  • AUD-CGI-15-29 | Management Assistance Report: Residential Security Concerns at U.S. Embassy Manila, Philippines (5/2015) (PDF-1 page)
  • AUD-IT-15-27 | Management Assistance Report: Department of State Security Program for Wireless Networks (5/2015) (PDF-1 page)

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