LGBT Ambassadors: We’ve Come This Far But … Still Pale and Male

Posted: 2:04 am EDT

 

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The following is an excerpt from Life After Jerusalem, a blog by  a lesbian American Indian Foreign Service officer:

None of the stories I have seen on the event (such as this one in the Washington Post and this one in the Washington Blade), which I am the first to admit is a wonderful thing and evidence of how far we have come, mentioned this absence. Which I take as evidence of how far we have to go.
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When the Department recently appointed an LGBT envoy, which to its credit is a career FSO (as is only one of the out gay Ambassadors), it appointed another white man. I was told at the time that there just aren’t any lesbians or people of color who rank highly enough to be considered. And that seems to be true. I can find no lesbian or out person of color who has made it to the ranks of Senior Foreign Service.

Of course, rank didn’t stop the Department during Secretary Rice’s tenure from appointing several men to the position of Deputy Assistant Secretary (DAS) who were only FS 02s in rank (for reference, FS 02 is the Foreign Service equivalent of a Lt. Colonel. Senior Foreign Service is the equivalent of a general. The highest ranking out lesbians that I know of in the Department are FS 01s, or Colonels, higher ranking than those men who were made DASes). And those men did not return to their mid-level positions afterward. In fact, two became Ambassadors, another an Assistant Secretary.

So really, the Department could appoint a career lesbian or out person of color if it really wanted to.

Read in full at Life After Jerusalem.

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U.S. Ambassador to Libya Deborah Jones (@SafiraDeborah) Exits Twitter, Leaves Behind 49.8K Followers

Posted: 12:01 pm PDT
Updated: 5:24 pm PDT

 

Screen Shot 2015-03-23Our ambassador to Libya Deborah Jones who is currently based in Malta tweeted about eight civilians who were killed in an air strike near Tripoli.

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Apparently, that tweet caused a firestorm in Libya as those killed were reportedly not killed in an air strike but attacked in their homes.

 

 

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Sometime later, Ambassador Jones tweeted this:

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Screen Capture, @SafiraDeborah's tweets

Screen Capture, @SafiraDeborah’s tweets click image for larger view

 

Then this happened:

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And that’s that.

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A chilly year up north? How Canada left U.S. Ambassador Bruce Heyman out in the cold

Posted: 12:57  am EDT

 

On March 16, the United States and Canada signed  a new agreement reaffirming the United States and Canada’s commitment to enhancing security while facilitating lawful travel and trade, and supersedes the existing U.S.-Canada Air Preclearance agreement signed in 2001.  The new preclearance agreement – allowing for the immigration, customs and agriculture inspections required for entry into either country to occur on foreign soil – will reportedly reduce congestion and delays at the border and increase efficiency and predictability in cross-border travel, tourism and transportation.

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All smiles there, and why not?

Then yesterday, the Globe and Mail’s Campbell Clark has a long piece on what is reportedly Bruce Heyman’s “rough year” as America’s ambassador to Ottawa.

For Mr. Heyman, it’s telling that since the day he presented his credentials nearly a year ago, when he and his wife Vicki had a 15-minute meet-and-greet with Mr. Harper and his wife Laureen, the U.S. ambassador has never had a one-on-one with the PM.
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“There was no edict,” one senior Canadian government figure insisted. But several sources said there was at least a common narrative, from the Prime Minister’s Office to ministers, that Mr. Heyman wasn’t welcome.

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Today, there’s also this Vanderbilt Mag piece noting that “Our northern neighbor is the United States’ largest goods trading partner, with $632 billion in total goods trade in 2013.”

“Bruce and I are really tackling this job as a team,” says Vicki. “We’ve been traveling the country like road warriors. Top to bottom, right to left.”

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A related note — right there is an example of unpaid labor by a chief of mission spouse, a tradition deeply valued by the State Department until 1972 when the directive on diplomatic wives was issued and thereby ruined the much-beloved twofer system. That’s when participation by a Foreign Service wife in the work of a post was deemed “a voluntary act of a private person” and when the diplomatic spouse’s performance memorandum stopped being placed in the FSO’s performance dossier. We presumed, by the language of the directive, that up to 1972 there were no accompanying male diplomatic spouses in the service.

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US Embassy Seoul: Ambassador Mark Lippert Returns to Work

Posted: 1:13  pm EDT

 

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US Embassy Tokyo: Consular Section Contributes to Flowers Will Bloom Project

Posted: 12:19 am  EDT

 

Via US Embassy Tokyo

“The American Embassy offers its continued sympathy and support for the victims of the 3.11 Triple Disaster, and is pleased and proud to contribute to the Flowers Will Bloom project. Here, staff from our consular section offer their version of the Flowers Will Bloom, highlighted by photos of Ambassador Kennedy’s visits to Tohoku in 2013 and 2014.”

The triple disaster of the earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear plant breakdown struck Japan on March 11, 2011.

 

 

Embassy Tokyo and USCG Okinawa are currently in the front pages due to media reports that both Ambassador Kennedy and Consul General Alfred Magleb had been the objects of death threats in telephone calls last month. We don’t know why the news are just showing up now.

The Consular Section in Naha serves a large number of American military personnel and their families stationed on Okinawa. According to the Consulate General, its staff includes a 10-person consular team looking after Americans in need of passports (over 5,000 per year), reports of birth abroad (well above 1,000 annually), and other U.S. citizen services.

According to a 2014 CRS report, the Japanese archipelago serves as the most significant forward-operating platform for the U.S. military in the region; approximately 53,000 military personnel (39,000 onshore and 14,000 afloat in nearby waters), 43,000 dependents, and 5,000 Department of Defense civilian employees live in Japan.  It also notes that about 25% of all facilities used by U.S. Forces Japan and about half of the U.S. military personnel are located in Okinawa, which comprises less than 1% of Japan’s total land area.

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U.S. Embassy Fiji: Goodbye Ambassador Reed, Hello Ambassador Cefkin

Posted: 00:2020 am EDT

 

Via U.S. Embassy Fiji, January 2015:

Ambassador A. Frankie Reed had her farewell ceremony at the Embassy. From everyone here at the Embassy we wish her all the best and a "Va nuinui vinaka e na nomu lesu tale i America" (photo from US Embassy Fiji/FB)

Ambassador A. Frankie Reed had her farewell ceremony at the Embassy. From everyone here at the Embassy we wish her all the best and a “Va nuinui vinaka e na nomu lesu tale i America” (photo from US Embassy Suva/FB) January 2015

Ambassador Cefkin posses with warriors — at US Embassy Suva. (Photo by US Embassy Suva/FB)

Ambassador Cefkin posses with warriors at the welcome ceremony — at US Embassy Suva. (Photo by US Embassy Suva/FB) February 2015

The American ambassador to Fiji is also accredited to Kiribati, Nauru, Tonga, and Tuvalu.  The Embassy’s Consular Section offers a full range of American citizen and visa services for Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Tonga, Tuvalu, and the French territories in the South Pacific: French Polynesia, New Caledonia, and Wallis and Futuna.

The embassy  says it is  reaching out to the Governments of Kiribati and Tuvalu to better understand the countries’ emergency needs in the aftermath of Tropical Cyclone Pam. It issued a  disaster declaration for Tuvalu and is reportedly working with relief agencies to address the immediate needs of those affected by the storm.

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Nomination: Ian C. Kelly — From Diplomat in Residence UIC to US Embassy Georgia

Posted: 00:12 am EDT

 

On March 12, President Obama announced his intent to nominate Ambassador Ian C. Kelly as the next ambassador to Georgia. The Wh released the following brief bio:

Ian C. Kelly, a career member of the Foreign Service, class of Minister-Counselor, currently serves as the Department of State’s Diplomat in Residence at the University of Illinois at Chicago, a position he has held since 2013.  Prior to that, Mr. Kelly served as U.S. Representative, with the rank of Ambassador, to the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe in Vienna, Austria from 2010 to 2013.  Mr. Kelly was Spokesperson in the State Department’s Bureau of Public Affairs from 2009 to 2010, Director of the Office of Russian Affairs in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs from 2007 to 2009, and Public Affairs Officer at the U.S. Mission to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization from 2004 to 2007.  He was an Information Officer at the U.S. Embassy in Rome, Italy from 2000 to 2004, an Information Officer at the U.S. Embassy in Ankara, Turkey from 1997 to 2000, and a Program Officer in the Office of the Coordinator of Newly Independent States Assistance from 1994 to 1996.  Prior to that, Mr. Kelly held positions at U.S. Missions in Austria, Serbia, the former USSR, and Italy.  Before joining the Foreign Service in 1985, he taught Russian language in the former USSR and at Barnard and Columbia Colleges in New York City.

Mr. Kelly received a B.A. from Saint Olaf College, an M.A. from Northwestern University, and a Ph.D. from Columbia University.

U.S. Ambassador to the OSCE Ian Kelly speaks at the Open Skies Treaty Review Conference.

U.S. Ambassador to the OSCE Ian Kelly speaks at the Open Skies Treaty Review Conference. (photo by state.gov)

The current Ambassador to Georgia, Richard Norland who was appointed by President Obama as chief of mission to the U.S. Embassy in Tbilisi in 2012 released the following statement:

I am pleased that the White House has nominated such an experienced and well-respected colleague to succeed me later this year here in Georgia.  His candidacy will next be considered by the U.S. Senate, and subject to Senate confirmation we would expect him to arrive in Tbilisi sometime after my anticipated departure upon completion of my 3-year tour later this summer.  One of the most difficult parts of being a professional diplomat is to contemplate leaving a place one has come to know and love, but that is in the nature of this profession.  In the months until my departure, it will continue to be my honor to do my best to advance U.S.-Georgia relations and promote democracy, security and prosperity in this remarkable, historic land.

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Old Diplomats’ Almanac Question of the Day: So you want to be an American Ambassador?

Posted: 00:07  PDT

 

VIDEO: U.S. Ambassador to Seoul Mark Lippert: ‘I feel incredibly lucky’

Posted: 5:37 pm PST

 

Mark Lippert, the U.S. ambassador to South Korea, joins TODAY to talk about the terrifying moment he was attacked by a man wielding a knife. He’s out of the hospital and recovering, and says he feels safe in South Korea.

 

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